Feb 28, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • CHEM 110 - (E) Introductory Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (CHEM 110 is a prerequisite for CHEM 111 )

    A study of the fundamental concepts of general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry.

  
  • CHEM 110-111 - (E) Introductory Chemistry

    6 cr.


    (CHEM 110 is a prerequisite for CHEM 111)

    A study of the fundamental concepts of general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 110L-111L - Introductory Chemistry Laboratory

    2 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 110L is prerequisite for CHEM 111L)

    Experiments dealing with principles of general, organic and biological chemistry are performed. Two hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 111 - (E) Introductory Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (CHEM 110  is a prerequisite for CHEM 111)

    A study of the fundamental concepts of general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry.

  
  • CHEM 112 - (E) General and Analytical Chemistry

    3 cr.
    A study of the laws, theories and principles of general chemistry together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each semester.
  
  • CHEM 112-113 - (E) General and Analytical Chemistry

    6 cr.


    (CHEM 112 is a prerequisite for CHEM 113) 

    A study of the laws, theories and principles of general chemistry together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 112L-113L - General and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 112L is prerequisite for CHEM 113L) 

    Experiments involve semi-micro techniques for qualitative and quantitative analysis (gravimetric and volumetric analysis). Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 113 - (E) General and Analytical Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (CHEM 112  is a prerequisite for CHEM 113)

    A study of the laws, theories and principles of general chemistry together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 114L - General Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    2 cr.


    A special laboratory course for those students who are advanced in chemistry. Semi-micro techniques of gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis. Admission will be on the basis of a placement exam and the professor’s permission. 

    Note: For students with majors in the Chemistry and Biology departments, this course will satisfy the requirements for the CHEM 112L-113L  laboratory courses.

  
  • CHEM 202 - (E) Global Change

    3 cr.
    Earth system sciences and global environmental change, examining the records of past changes in climate, land-mass distribution, and atmospheric and oceanic composition, evaluating fossils, tree ring data, and geological indicators.
  
  • CHEM 232 - (E) Organic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 112-113 ; CHEM 232 is a prerequisite for CHEM 233 )

    An introduction to the chemistry of the principal aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their derivatives. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 232L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 113L or CHEM 114L  is a prerequisite for CHEM 232L; CHEM 232L is prerequisite for CHEM 233L )

    Investigation of the chemical preparations and syntheses of major organic functional groups. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 233 - (E) Organic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 112-113 ; CHEM 232  is a prerequisite for CHEM 233)

    An introduction to the chemistry of the principal aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their derivatives. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 233L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 232L  is prerequisite for CHEM 233L)

    Investigation of the chemical preparations and syntheses of major organic functional groups. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 240 - Inorganic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 113 )

    Descriptive chemistry of main group and selected transition elements and their compounds correlated with the periodic table, physical properties, atomic and molecular structure.

  
  • CHEM 320 - Industrial Chemistry

    3 cr.
    A review of chemical operations and unit or batch processes common to industry. Econometric analysis involving supply-demand, productivity, commodity prices and costing is an important area covered, as are measures of productivity and patent activity. Three hours lecture.
  
  • CHEM 330 - Organic Chemistry III

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232 - CHEM 233 )

    A continuation of Chemistry 232-233, emphasizing the study of the major types of organic mechanisms. Two hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 330L - Organic Chemistry III

    1.5-3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 233L  is a prerequisite)

    Experiments involve advanced techniques in synthesis and characterization of organic compounds. Six hours laboratory for Chemistry majors and three hours laboratory for Biochemistry majors.

  
  • CHEM 340 - Environmental Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232 - CHEM 233 )

    A study of chemicals in the environment including their origin, transport, reactions, and toxicity in soil, water, air and living systems.

  
  • CHEM 342 - Environmental Toxicology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232 -CHEM 233 , BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 )

    This course will encompass several realms of environmental toxicology, including general toxicological theory, effects of contaminants on various biological systems, and discussion of environmental toxicological issues (i.e., specific case studies as well as the types of analyses used in these types of studies).

  
  • CHEM 344 - Environmental Geochemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232 -CHEM 233 

    Consideration of natural cycles (carbon, sulfur, oxygen, water, etc.) that govern the chemistry of our planet. The origins of the elements, paleohistory, and composition of the planet. Effects of man’s activities with attention to their effects on the state of the oceans and the atmosphere.

  
  • CHEM 350 - General Biochemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 233 )

    An introduction to the study of biochemistry. A study of the chemical nature of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes, including relationships among vitamins, hormones, and inorganic compounds.  Three hours lecture. Successful completion of CHEM 350 precludes credit for CHEM 450 .

  
  • CHEM 351 - General Biochemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 350 )

    An introduction to the study of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and proteins, including energy transformations and the role of enzyme systems in the above processes.

    Successful completion of CHEM 351 precludes credit for CHEM 451 . Three hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 360 - Biophysical Chemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232 -CHEM 233  and CHEM 232L -CHEM 233L )

    An introduction to the application of physical-chemical principles to biological problems. This involves aqueous solutions, colloidal chemistry, thermodynamics, electro-chemistry, chemical kinetics and nuclear chemistry. Three hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 360L - Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co requisite; CHEM 360L is prerequisite for CHEM 361L )

    Experiments involve applications of physical-chemical techniques to biological problems. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 361 - Biophysical Chemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite CHEM 360 )

    A continuation of Biophysical Chemistry I involving a study of atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, photo-chemistry, and surface chemistry with applications to biological and biochemical phenomena. Three hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 361L - Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co requisite; CHEM 360L  is prerequisite for CHEM 361L)

    Experiments involve applications of physical-chemical techniques to biological problems. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 362 - Physical Chemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 113 , MATH 222 )

    A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter and the dynamics of chemical reactions. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 362L - (W) Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    Lecture is pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 362L is prerequisite for CHEM 363L )

    Experiments demonstrate physical-chemical properties of matter and reactions. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 363 - Physical Chemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 113 , MATH 222 )

    A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter and the dynamics of chemical reactions. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  • CHEM 363L - (W) Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 362L  is prerequisite for CHEM 363L)

    Experiments demonstrate physical-chemical properties of matter and reactions. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  • CHEM 370 - Instrumental Analysis

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 360  or CHEM 362 )

    Instrumental methods of analysis consisting of theory and application of such instrumental techniques as spectroscopy, polarography, and instrumental titrimetry. Two hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 370L - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite)

    Experiments involve application of modern chemical instrumentation and techniques to quantitative analysis. Six hours laboratory.

  
  • CHEM 384 - Special Topics in Chemistry

    2-4 cr.
    Study of selected topics in chemistry and biochemistry, depending on student and faculty interest and the current state of the science.  It may include topics from inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, polymer chemistry and interdisciplinary topics.
  
  • CHEM 390 - Chemical Literature and Writing

    1 cr.
    A study of the published source material of chemical science and industry.  The course includes practical instruction in library technique and in the written reporting of results. One hour lecture.
  
  • CHEM 391 - Seminar

    1 cr.
    Current topics in chemistry, biochemistry, and industrial chemistry are prepared and presented by the students.
  
  • CHEM 440 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 362 -CHEM 363  or CHEM 360 -CHEM 361 )

    Theoretical concepts and their application to the reactions and structure of inorganic compounds.  Coordination chemistry and related topics, physical methods and reaction mechanisms. Three hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 440L - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) 

    Laboratory methods involving synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds are developed. Three hours laboratory.

  
  • CHEM 450 - Biochemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 233 )

    Structure-function relationships with emphasis on the organic and biophysical characteristics of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates are described.  Enzyme mechanisms and kinetics and the thermodynamic basis of intermediary metabolism are major themes.  Three hours lecture. CHEM 450L  is required of Biochemistry majors.  Successful completion of CHEM 450 precludes credit for CHEM 350 .

  
  • CHEM 450L - (W) Biochemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.
    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite)

    Experiments involve techniques used in characterization of biopolymers and study of enzyme kinetics.
  
  • CHEM 451 - Biochemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 450 )

    The discussion of intermediary metabolism is continued from CHEM 450 with emphasis on lipid protein and nucleic acid metabolism.  Chemical aspects of molecular biology, including DNA replication, gene regulation and protein biosynthesis are included.  Three hours lecture.  Successful completion of CHEM 451 precludes credit for CHEM 351 .

  
  • CHEM 452 - Enzymology

    3 cr.
    A course in the chemical nature of enzymes with relation to mechanism of enzyme action and kinetics, purification and identification of enzymes and isoenzymes, biochemical and physiological aspects of enzymes in living systems. Three hours lecture.
  
  • CHEM 455 - Chemical Toxicology

    3 cr.


    (Formerly CHEM 352)  (Prerequisite: CHEM 350  or CHEM 450  for the first semester and CHEM 351  or CHEM 451  as prerequisite or co-requisite for the second semester)

    The nature, mode of action and methods of counteracting substances which have an adverse effect on biological systems, especially human. Medical, industrial and environmental forensic aspects will be discussed. Three hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 460 - Physical Chemistry III

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 363 )

    Quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including classical problems, perturbational theory, variational theory and specific applications of molecular orbital theory to organic molecules and spectroscopic applications.

  
  • CHEM 464 - Polymer Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Co-requisites: CHEM 330 , CHEM 361  or CHEM 363 )

    Survey of preparative methods for polymers; characterization of polymers using physico-chemical methods, spectroscopy, and thermal analysis; structure-property relationships; and applications of polymers. Three hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 464L - Polymer Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 330 , CHEM 464 )

    Laboratory experiments investigate synthesis and characterization methods for polymers, structure- property effects, and thermal analysis of polymers. Three hours laboratory.

  
  • CHEM 470 - Forensic Chemistry

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 360  or CHEM 362 )

    Acquisition of forensic evidence through use of analytical techniques.  Statistical and multivariate analysis of data, and presentation of forensic evidence in a legal environment. Two hours lecture.

  
  • CHEM 470L - Forensic Chemistry Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 360L  or CHEM 362L , CHEM 370 , CHEM 370L ; co-requisite: CHEM 470 )

    Acquisition of forensic evidence through use of analytical techniques.  Statistical and multivariate analysis of data, and presentation of forensic evidence in a legal environment. Four hours laboratory.

  
  • CHEM 490 - Advanced Topics in Biochemistry Capstone

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 450 -CHEM 451  or permission of the instructor)

    The capstone course for students majoring in Biochemistry-Preprofessional Track.  Fundamentals of biochemistry are used to explore various themes in applied biochemistry.  Students are responsible for researching advanced topics and presenting lecture/discussions or case studies to the class.

  
  • CHEM 493 - (W) Undergraduate Research

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 233 , CHEM 360  or CHEM 362 , CHEM 390 )

    Individual study and research in connection with a specific chemistry or biochemistry problem.  Results must be written as a thesis and defended before the department. 1.5 credits each semester.

  
  • CHEM 494 - (W) Undergraduate Research

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 233 , CHEM 360  or CHEM 362 , CHEM 390 )

    Individual study and research in connection with a specific chemistry or biochemistry problem.  Results must be written as a thesis and defended before the department. 1.5 credits each semester.

  
  • CHS 111 - (S) Introduction to Human Adjustment

    3 cr.
    Introduction to human adjustment throughout the lifespan.  Focuses on discrimination of normal and abnormal behavioral and emotional responses to developmental life stages and to common developmental concerns.
  
  • CHS 112 - Human Services Systems

    3 cr.
    Examines the human-services systems and institutions which have evolved as a response to human need.  Explores both the effect of social problems on individuals and families and the service systems designed to alleviate such problems.  Includes service learning component.
  
  • CHS 241 - (D) Case Management and Interviewing

    3 cr.
    The role of the human-services professional as a case manager or coordinator of services is examined. Initial interviewing skills and techniques are discussed with an emphasis on case conceptualization, problem identification, goal selection, evaluation, and follow-up. Includes service-learning component.
  
  • CHS 242 - Counseling Theories

    3 cr.
    The role of the human-services professional as an individual counselor or caseworker is examined. Theories and techniques as well as problems in individual counseling are explored.
  
  • CHS 284 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Courses developed to provide in-depth coverage of specific topics in human services.  Course title will be provided in advance of registration.  May be used only twice to satisfy major or minor elective requirement.
  
  • CHS 293 - (W) Research Methods in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    An introduction to research methodology as applied to problems in human-services agencies and settings.  Specific topics include descriptive, experimental, and quasi-experimental research methods.  Emphasis is placed on development of the student’s ability to be a critical consumer of research in human services.
  
  • CHS 322 - Cognitive Disabilities

    3 cr.
    Etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cognitive disabilities are presented.  This course examines both student and societal beliefs concerning persons with cognitive disabilities.  The implications of living with cognitive disabilities will be explored and the impact of disability culture as a means to facilitate the empowerment of children and adults with cognitive disabilities will be presented.
  
  • CHS 323 - Psychiatric Rehabilitation

    3 cr.
    Examination of the problems associated with mental and emotional disturbances are presented.  Emphasis is placed on contemporary modalities of rehabilitation as they relate to community mental-health programs, and innovative non-medical treatment approaches.  Critical issues in mental health will be discussed.
  
  • CHS 325 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disordered Eating

    3 cr.
    Designed to introduce students to the clinical descriptions of disordered eating and eating disorders along with knowledge of their complex nature.  This course will explore: biopsychosocial factors, medical and psychosocial consequences, and possible treatment modalities including prevention.
  
  • CHS 330 - Introduction to Art Therapy

    3 cr.
    Provides a broad overview of the field of art therapy.  The work of art therapists will be discussed along with the history, theory, practice, populations and applications of the field.  The course will be presented through lectures, readings and hand-on experiential work.
  
  • CHS 331 - Health and Behavior

    3 cr.
    Focuses on stress which affects thoughts, emotions, and the body.  Stress diseases of adaption include cancer, Type A Behavior, GI tract disorders along with stress-related thought disorders and emotional disturbances.  Students learn to apply relaxation, cognitive restructuring and record-keeping in the treatment of their own as well as others’ health.
  
  • CHS 333 - (D) Multiculturalism in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    Focuses on current social and cultural issues in human services and related fields.  Human development in a multicultural and diverse society will be examined and the basic objectives and dimensions of multicultural intervention will be defined.  Student self-awareness of values, attitudes, and beliefs will be emphasized. Includes service-learning component.
  
  • CHS 334 - Marital and Family Counseling

    3 cr.
    Theories of family counseling will be presented with specific attention to the structural and strategic approaches.  A variety of family counseling techniques and stages will be learned through the use of role play and videotaping. The utilization of family counseling will be discussed.  
  
  • CHS 335 - Administration in Human Services

    3 cr.
    Focuses on the development of skills and knowledge related to program and organizational development, and community-wide planning in human services.  Topics include organizational theory applied to human-services settings, consultation, supervision, planning, funding and training.
  
  • CHS 337 - (W, D) Counseling Girls and Women

    3 cr.
    This course is designed to explore the topic of counseling girls and women in a sociocultural, historical, and multicultural context.  Through the examination of the history of women (e.g., social construction of gender, identity) from a self-in-relation foundation, and feminist counseling and its role in de-pathologizing the importance of relationships to girls and women will be explored.
  
  • CHS 338 - Poverty, Homelessness and Social Justice

    3 cr.
    Focuses on developing and understanding of the social, historical and political dimensions of poverty and homelessness in the U.S. and explores the implications for distributive justice.   Students assess the effectiveness of the social policies and programs created to combat poverty and homelessness, and participate in course-required service learning and social action projects.
  
  • CHS 339 - Counseling Boys and Men

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHS 111 , CHS 241 )

    Focuses on the development of boys and men and the social construction of masculinity within social and historical perspectives.  The impact of culture on development and the needs of boys and men that result receive special attention.  The role of the counselor in working with boys and men will be explored.

  
  • CHS 340 - Career Seminar

    1 cr.


    (Majors only; Prerequisite for CHS 380 )

    Designed to introduce the student in the Counseling and Human Services curriculum to counseling, human development and human-services occupations.  Short- and long-term goals are examined in preparation for internship, employment or further study.

  
  • CHS 341 - Group Dynamics

    3 cr.
    A basic understanding of group dynamics and individual behavior in groups is presented. Methods of developing and organizing group programs are stressed.  Students participate in a group experience. Includes service-learning component.
  
  • CHS 342 - Foundations of Rehabilitation

    3 cr.
    Students will develop sensitivity, appreciation and understanding of what it means to have a disability.  Topics covered will include federal, state and community mandates, independent-living concepts, and the basic principles of rehabilitation.   A comprehensive review of the variety of rehabilitation programs is provided.   Ethical decision-making will be integrated into the course and students will learn to practice with cultural sensitivity.   Site visits to rehabilitation agencies and applied experiences will be conducted.
  
  • CHS 343 - Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities

    3 cr.
    Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of the medical, functional and psychosocial aspects of a wide array of disabilities.  The emphasis will be holistic and person- centered.   Curriculum components include learning medical terminology, the use of medical information and discussion of psychosocial aspects of disability.   Students will have the opportunity to interact with persons with disabilities.
  
  • CHS 344 - Vocational Evaluation

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on the theme of assessment and employment of individuals with disabilities.  Students will discover the impact of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 and the Americans with Disabilities Act on employment concerns of persons with disabilities.  Students will compile and utilize assessment information such as prior records, test results, work samples and situational assessment.
  
  • CHS 360 - Individual Assessment

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: a statistics course e.g. PSYC 210  is required)

    Introduces principles of test construction, administration, and interpretation.  Promotes understanding of assessment in counseling/human services and human resources.  Emphasis is placed on competency development in evaluation and interpretation of ability, interest, personality, and performance assessments with experiential components.  Ethical and legal issues, historical considerations, and assessment for diverse populations are reviewed.

  
  • CHS 375 - (W) Counseling Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Persons

    3 cr.


    (Pre-requisite: Junior Standing)

    Examines development of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) persons and culture.  Intersections of sexual orientation and gender identity with variables including race spirituality/religion, and disability are emphasized.  Myths, stereotypes, and implications of managing marginalized identities are reviewed along with strategies to provide affirmative services to GLBT persons.

  
  • CHS 380 - Internship in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHS 340 )

    The internship is a significant clinical and educational experience. It provides both a supervised practical experience in the student’s field and an opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills.  Students will spend a minimum of 150 hours in the field placement. (Prerequisite for CHS 481 )

  
  • CHS 421 - Addictions

    3 cr.
    An integrated biophysical model of addition and recovery is described.  Approaches to assessment, treatment and relapse prevention are covered.
  
  • CHS 422 - Substance-Abuse Education

    3 cr.
    Design, implementation, and evaluation of substance-abuse education and prevention programs.
  
  • CHS 423 - Issues in Substance Abuse

    3 cr.
    Legal and health consequences of substance abuse are examined.  Special attention is given to the role of family dynamics, recovery process, dual disorders and ethics in the counseling process.
  
  • CHS 439 - Spirituality in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    This course will assist students in understanding various models of spirituality and their potential integration into the counseling process.  Critical reflection on a variety of diverse spiritual perspectives and their implications for human services practice is encouraged.  Current research in the area of spirituality and counseling is examined.
  
  • CHS 440 - Job Development

    3 cr.
    An awareness of the changing world of work will be the backdrop for job analysis, labor-market surveys, vocational adjustment, job development and job placement.  Students will be exposed to both traditional and current models of employment for individuals with disabilities.  Coordination of services with collaborating agencies (e.g., social, financial and vocational) will be included.  Rehabilitation technology and adapted computer applications will be emphasized.
  
  • CHS 441 - (W) Crisis Intervention

    3 cr.
    Theory and practice of crisis intervention as applied to common crisis situations such as suicide, battering, violent behavior, post- traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, sexual assault, and personal loss. Includes service-learning component.
  
  • CHS 459 - Spirituality in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    This course assists students in understanding various models of spirituality and their potential integration into the counseling process.  Critical reflection on a variety of diverse spiritual perspectives for human services practice is encouraged.  Current research is examined.  (Course is offered only in the Summers.)
  
  • CHS 480 - Internship in Rehabilitation Services

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHS 380 )

    The internship is specifically designed for students in the Rehabilitation Services concentration.  Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours in their field placement.  The internship provides a practical experience in the rehabilitation field and an opportunity to integrate course knowledge.

  
  • CHS 481 - Advanced Internship in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHS 380 )

    This advanced internship in Counseling and Human Services involves 200 hours in a community agency or organization.  This course is required.

  
  • CJ 110 - (S) Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 cr.
    A foundation course examining problems in the study of crime and criminal justice, basic elements of criminal law and constitutional rights, and the functions of, as well as the relationship between, major components of the criminal justice system; agencies and role of law enforcement; prosecution; the judicial process; and corrections.
  
  • CJ 230 - Crime Prevention

    3 cr.
    This course analyzes the basic theories of community policing, problem-solving policing and crime prevention.  The emphasis is on primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques.  Emphasis will be given to the various analytical approaches to the study of criminal profiling, terrorism and methods of planning.
  
  • CJ 237 - The Investigative Process

    3 cr.
    This course considers appropriate investigative procedures concerning major criminal investigations.  An analysis of specific investigative theories and courtroom applications will be conducted through learning simulation.  The homicide court problem will focus on the preservation and admission of evidence.
  
  • CJ 239 - Introductory Criminal Analysis

    3 cr.
    Focuses on the application of analytical techniques that support crime intervention and prevention strategies. Subspecialties include, but are not limited to: (1) criminal investigative analysis, (2) intelligence analysis and (3) intelligence analysis.  The analytical process incorporates innovative strategic and crime mapping tactical applications.
  
  • CJ 310 - Criminal Justice Process

    3 cr.
    A study of the law of criminal procedure, treating investigation and police practices, preliminary proceedings, and trial, as they relate to the development and structure of the American criminal justice system and as they affect offenders.
  
  • CJ 312 - Criminal Law

    3 cr.
    A study of substantive criminal law in view of its historical foundations, purpose, functions and limits; of crime and defenses generally; and of the elements which constitute certain specific crimes under state and federal statutes.
  
  • CJ 338 - Police Criminalistics

    3 cr.
    A course in crime scene reconstruction. Emphasis is on police criminalistics and the coordination of physical evidence with scientific laboratories.
  
  • CJ 382 - 383 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and instructor) 

    Directed projects and surveys in criminal justice, law enforcement, and corrections designed to give the student academic flexibility.

  
  • CJ 383 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and instructor) 

    Directed projects and surveys in criminal justice, law enforcement, and corrections designed to give the student academic flexibility.

  
  • CJ 480 - 481 - Internship Experience

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) 

    Supervised experiential learning in an approved criminal justice setting, taken preferably in junior and senior year.

  
  • CJ 481 - Internship Experience

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) 

    Supervised experiential learning in an approved criminal justice setting, taken preferably in junior and senior year.

  
  • CMPS 101 - (Q) Computational Thinking

    3 cr.
    This course introduces students to the concepts, methods, and principles employed by Computer Scientists in problem solving and solution development.  This body of knowledge has been successfully adopted by a wide variety of disciplines enabling significant advances in those disciplines.  Students will be introduced to this body of knowledge through the analysis of relevant problems and also learn to apply it through the development of computer programs.
  
  • CMPS 112 - (FYDT, FYOC) Introduction to Computing and Information Technology

    3 cr.
    This course presents foundational concepts and surveys the past, present and future of computing and information technology with an emphasis on the seminal ideas, concepts, inventions and innovations that fuel the Digital Revolution.  The sub-disciplines of computing are identified and discussed relative to each other.  This course is designed to foster knowledge and abilities needed for gathering, evaluating and disseminating information with an emphasis on digital technology and oral communication. (Credits may not be earned for both CMPS 112 and IT 112 .)
  
  • CMPS 134 - Computer Science I

    3 cr.
    An introduction to programming concepts and methodology using an object-oriented programming language (currently Java).  Topics include problem analysis, abstraction, modularization, the development and use of algorithms, reuse, and the use of programming constructs including data types, classes, control structures, and methods.
  
  • CMPS 136 - Computer Programming II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 134 )

    For non-computing majors who want more object-oriented programming experience. Includes data structures, file processing, graphical user interfaces and event-driven programming. May not be used to satisfy the requirements of CMPS or CIS.  May not be taken by a student who has credit for CMPS 144 .

 

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