Feb 28, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • MUS 220 - (CA,W) Music in the Renaissance

    3 cr.
    A study of the style characteristics of Renaissance music, and of musicians of Western Europe. Emphasis is given to how Renaissance ideals are reflected in the musical works, and the place of music and musicians in Renaissance society.
  
  • MUS 222 - Bach

    3 cr.


    (Formerly MUS 323) 

    The music of Johann Sebastian Bach in the context of the musical forms, styles, and genres current in the first half of the 18th century.  A survey of Bach’s life and works is followed by detailed study of selected vocal and instrumental compositions.

  
  • MUS 223 - Mozart

    3 cr.


    (Formerly MUS 324) 

    An examination of Mozart’s major works in the genres of symphony, concerto, chamber music, church music, and opera, together with a brief biographical survey.  The influence of late 18th-century culture and musical conventions on Mozart’s work is considered.

  
  • MUS 225 - Beethoven

    3 cr.


    (Formerly MUS 325) 

    Study of a composer whose fiery personality drove him to express through music universal concepts in an age of revolution, e.g., freedom and the dignity of the person.  Course traces the evolution of Beethoven’s major works – sonatas and concertos, symphonies and string quartets, as well as Fidelio and the Missa Solemnis – and the effect of his deafness on his view of life and on his later works.

  
  • MUS 226 - Romantic Music of the Nineteenth Century

    3 cr.
    A study of the major musical developments in the 19th century, the Romantic Period: the rise of piano literature, the art song, chamber and program music, and opera. Attention to nationalism.
  
  • MUS 228 - Music of the Twentieth Century

    3 cr.


    (MUS 112  recommended as prerequisite)

    A study of the history and literature of Western classical music in the 20th century.  The various “isms” of the period, including impressionism, expressionism, neo-classicism, serialism, and minimalism, will be examined.

  
  • MUS 233 - Music in America

    3 cr.
    An overview of music in the United States from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the 20th century. Classical, popular, and traditional musical styles are considered, including the symphony, the opera, the Broadway show, jazz, rock, hymnody and folk music.
  
  • MUS 235 - Music Theory I

    3 cr.
    The fundamental materials of tonal music: notes and rests, rhythm and meter, scales and modes, intervals, triads and seventh chords, melodic and harmonic organization, and an introduction to voice leading and part writing. Some knowledge of music notation helpful.
  
  • MUS 236 - Music Theory II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: MUS 235 )

    Extension of the tonal vocabulary to include chromatic harmony, modulatory techniques, and the use of extended chords, as well as an overview of selected post-tonal procedures.

  
  • MUS 280 - Liturgical Music

    3 cr.
    The role of music in the Roman Catholic Church.  Emphasis on the practical rather than the historical.  Recommended for any lay person or member of the clergy involved in developing church liturgy. No musical background required.
  
  • MUS 284 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Selected topics in music history will vary from year to year in accord with student/faculty interest.
  
  • MUS 335 - Introduction to Composition

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: MUS 235 , MUS 236 )

    Guided individual projects in original composition, together with the analysis of selected works from the classical repertory.

  
  • NEUR 110 - Neuroscience Lab Rotations

    0.5 cr.
    Through directed readings and laboratory visits, this course will expose students to neuroscience-related research currently under way at The University of Scranton. Various faculty members will demonstrate research activities in their labs while assigning readings and discussing current/future research plans. Graded pass/fail.
  
  • NEUR 111 - Neuroscience Research Literature

    1 cr.
    Guided by program faculty, students will read and discuss current ground-breaking research in the field. Graded pass/fail.
  
  • NEUR 231 - (E) Behavioral Neuroscience

    3-4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 110  or BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 )

    Introduction to the field of neuroscience, examining the cellular bases of behavior, effects of drugs and behavior, brain/body correlates of motivation and emotion, and neural changes accompanying pathology.  Three hours lecture and optional 1.5-credit laboratory. Lab fee; Lab offered fall only. (Credit cannot be earned for PSYC 231  and NEUR 231.)

  
  • NEUR 330 - (W) Neuroscience Research Methods

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 141  and BIOL 142 , PSYC 210  or equivalent, PSYC 231 )

    Hands on experience using techniques specific to neuroscience to understand neurobiological problems.  Integrated lecture and laboratory class outlining the theories and application of neuroscience.  Topics vary but may include neuropharmacology, immunohistochemistry, neurostatisitics, neurophysiology and computer-aided neuroreconstructions.

  
  • NEUR 339 - Psychopharmacology

    3 cr.


    (Formerly PSYC 384)  (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; grade of C or higher in NEUR 231 /PSYC 231 )

    This course surveys the field of psychopharmacology with particular attention being paid to functional neuoranatomy, the important role of behavioral science, and the neuropharmacology of normal/abnormal behaviors.  Numerous research strategies are examined, including dose response functions, therapeutic indices, routes of administration, and pharmacological/behavioral models of clinical conditions.  (Credits cannot be earned for PSYC 339  and NEUR 339.)

  
  • NEUR 348 - Functional Neuroanatomy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 245 , or, for Neuroscience majors, NEUR 231 /PSYC 231 )

    Study of the organization and function of the neuron, neural circuits, and the major sensory and motor components of the central nervous system; bioelectric phenomena, synaptic transmission; the neural basis for higher functions such as cognition, memory, and learning.  Three hours lecture.  (Credit cannot be earned for BIOL 348  and NEUR 348.)

  
  • NEUR 350 - Cognitive Neuroscience

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 210 ; PSYC 231/NEUR 231 , or PSYC 234 )

    This course explores the neural underpinnings of human cognition by introducing research on the relationship between mind and brain.  The course introduces and expands on neuroanatomy, research methods used to make inferences about brain bases of cognition (e.g., imaging, electronencephalography, lesion studies), and computational approaches to cognitive neuroscience.  Discussions and activities focus on the brain bases of cognitive operations in perception, attention, memory, language, executive control, social cognition, reasoning, and decision making.

    (Credits cannot be earned for NEUR 350 and PSYC 350 .)

  
  • NEUR 357 - Developmental Neuroscience

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: One of the following: NEUR 330 , BIOL 241L , BIOL 245L , BIOL 350L , BIOL 351L , BIOL 361L )

    Study of the embryonic and regenerative development of the nervous system in metazoans. Topics include brain development, neuron growth and regeneration, nervous system repair, and emergence of behavior.  Integrated laboratory exercises focus on embryonic nervous systems, nerve cell growth in vitro, and independently designed experiments.

    Course offered alternate years.  Credits cannot be earned for BIOL 357  and NEURO 357.

  
  • NEUR 358 - Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 )

    Introduces Biology and Neuroscience majors to the cellular and molecular biology of the vertebrate nervous system. Includes ion channel structure and function, synthesis, packaging and release of neurotransmitters, receptor and transduction mechanisms, intracellular signaling, cell-to-cell communication, glial cell function, and neural growth and development.  Three hours lecture.  (Credit cannot be earned for NEUR 358 and BIOL 358 .)

  
  • NEUR 368 - Neuroethology

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisite: 200-level or higher Biology course)

    Study of the neuronal mechanisms of behavior in an organism’s natural environment.  Topics include evolution of neuronal control, neuronal processing of sensory information, sensorimotor integrations, spatial-orientations, neuromodulations, neuronal underpinnings of bird songs, neuroethology of navigation and learning and memory.  (Credits for both NEUR 368 and BIOL 368  may not be earned.)

  
  • NEUR 384 - Special Topics in Neuroscience

    3-6 cr.


    (Formerly NEUR 170)  (Prerequisites: BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 , NEUR 231 /PSYC 231 )

    Course topics are developed by individual faculty to provide in depth coverage of specific areas in neuroscience.  Some courses have required or elective laboratory components.  Course titles and descriptions will be provided in advance of registration.

     

  
  • NEUR 444 - Sensory Biology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 245  and completion of or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 121/PHYS 121L /PHYS 141/PHYS 141L )

    The course applies multidisciplinary approaches to the study of senses: physics of stimuli, anatomy of receptor organs, neurophysiology of receptor cells, anatomy and central processing, animal behavior and artificial sensor design.  The course focuses on terrestrial vertebrates with occasional discussions on aquatic sensory systems. Three hours lecture.  (Credit cannot be earned for NEUR 444 and BIOL 444 .)

     

  
  • NEUR 493 - Undergraduate Research in Neuroscience

    1.5-3 cr.


    (Formerly NEUR 160-161)   (Prerequisites: BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 , NEUR 231 , NEUR 330 , minimum of one semester of successful completion of Faculty Student Research Program with the research instructor, and permission of instructor)

    Individual study and research on a specific topic relevant to neuroscience under the supervision of a faculty member. It is strongly recommended that this research be initiated during the junior year, and it is expected that the research will extend over a two-semester period.  (Offered in the Fall Semester)

  
  • NEUR 494 - Undergraduate Research in Neuroscience

    1.5-3 cr.


    (Formerly NEUR 160-161) (Prerequisites: BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 , NEUR 231 , NEUR 330 , minimum of one semester of successful completion of Faculty Student Research Program with the research instructor, and permission of Instructor.)

    Individual study and research on a specific topic relevant to neuroscience under the supervision of a faculty member. It is strongly recommended that this research be initiated during the junior year, and it is expected that the research will extend over a two-semester period.  (Offered in Spring Semester)

  
  • NSCI 102 - Science and Society

    3 cr.
    This course attempts to show how the sciences, particularly the behavioral sciences, impact both positively and negatively on society. Issues dealt with include the nature of science, similarities and differences between the scientific disciplines, the impact of science on the concept of free will, and the philosophical and moral implications of psychological testing, socio-biology, and Skinnerian radical behaviorism.
  
  • NSCI 103 - (E,W) The Ascent of Man

    3 cr.
    Science and technology from the ancient Greeks to the present will be discussed from the personal viewpoint of the scientists and inventors. Lectures will be supplemented by films, demonstrations, and field trips. Three hours lecture.
  
  • NSCI 105 - (E,W) Science in the Cinema

    3 cr.
    Many modern movies use science and technology as a backdrop. Consider Back to the Future, Star Wars, Jurassic Park, Outbreak, The Core, The Day After Tomorrow and Flubber. The media often forms the popular understanding of science and technology. Tools to differentiate between science fact and science fiction are provided.
     
  
  • NSCI 108 - (E) Science in Our Time

    3 cr.
    This course presents the latest developments in science and technology and explores the ideas and techniques underlying these developments. It investigates both the implication these developments have on society and public policy as well as the effect politics, social institutions and mores have on scientific and technological advancement.
  
  • NSCI 201 - (E) Science and the Human Environment

    3 cr.
    A brief study of the effects of technological, scientific and industrial progress on the air, land, and water resources of the human environment. Problems in each of the resource areas will be discussed in detail.
  
  • NSCI 208H - (E,W) Science of the Day

    3 cr.
    An in-depth review and analysis of current developments in science and technology. Topics will be selected from various current periodical and media sources. The scientific, social and political context of each will be discussed.
  
  • NURS 100 - Family Health

    3 cr.


    (For non-Nursing majors; not a Natural Science course) 

    Concepts and principles related to the promotion and maintenance of optimal family health.  Considers factors pertinent to health needs and health practices throughout the life cycle.

  
  • NURS 111 - (D) Women’s Health

    3 cr.


    (Open to all students; not a Natural Science course) 

    Course focuses on historic, physiological, social, cultural, emotional and economic issues affecting women’s health.  The course explores strategies to empower women’s use of health-care services.  Class members will be expected to participate actively in all discussions.

  
  • NURS 140 - (W, FYOC, FYDT) Introduction to Nursing Concepts

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Nursing majors only)

    An exploration of the core concepts of the client, health, nursing and health patterns.  Historical, philosophical, and social development of nursing and the role of the professional nurse are presented.  Understanding of health and health continuum in the broader perspective of the human person.  Service learning: 20 hours. Three hours lecture.

  
  • NURS 213 - (W) Child and Adolescent Health Promotion

    3 cr.


    (Recommended Prerequisite: PSYC 221 , but open to all students)

    Focus on the professional’s role as advocate, care-giver and/or teacher in the promotion of health for children and adolescents, directly through health maintenance and prevention and indirectly through health care policy.

  
  • NURS 241 - (W, FYDT, FYOC) Perspectives in Professional Nursing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: WRTG 107 ; sophomore standing in Nursing, licensed nurses only; co-requisite: C/IL 104 )

    Perspectives in professional nursing explores concepts incorporated in the philosophy, organizing framework and curriculum structures of the Nursing program.  Integration of the health patterns and nursing process in the delivery of professional nursing care is introduced.  Pertinent issues impacting on the nursing profession are addressed.

  
  • NURS 242 - Health, Illness and Assessment

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: sophomore standing, licensed nurses only; pre- or co-requisite: NURS 241 )

    Focus on the professional nurse’s role as caregiver in assessing, diagnosing and planning interventions of adaptive health patterns in individuals.  Application of the nursing process to well persons and to individuals and families with alterations in health patterns.  Exploration of concepts for planning holistic health care. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  
  • NURS 250 - Physical Assessment Related to Health Patterns

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 110 -111 , sophomore standing in Nursing)

    Development of beginning skill in the basic physical-assessment techniques necessary for the promotion of optimal health as a care-giver.  Focus on the professional nurse’s role in assessing the physiological dimension of adaptive health patterns in individuals with a stable health status.  Service learning: 10 hours. Two hours lecture and three hours campus laboratory.

  
  • NURS 251 - Fundamentals of Nursing

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 140 , NURS 250 ; co-requisite: NURS 262 )

    Focus on the professional nurse’s role in promoting the individual’s health status, utilizing the developmental, physiological, psychological and sociocultural dimensions of functional health patterns.  Development of beginning skills in therapeutic nursing interventions.  Service learning: 10 hours. Two hours lecture, six hours campus/clinical laboratory.

  
  • NURS 262 - Pharmacology I

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 110 , BIOL 110 -111 , BIOL 210 )

    Principles of pharmacology and specific drug groups.  Emphasis is placed on drug actions, side effects, dosages and nursing responsibilities. (1.5 hr. lecture)

  
  • NURS 310 - (D) Understanding Transcultural Health Care

    3 cr.
    This course will focus on exploring values, beliefs and lifestyles of diverse cultural groups in order to broaden the student’s perception and understanding of health and illness and the variety of meanings these terms carry for members of differing groups.
  
  • NURS 312 - (D) Nursing the Older Adult

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: junior standing in Nursing, OT or PT) 

    Focus on the professional nurse’s role of care-giver, advocate and teacher in promoting and maintaining adaptive responses of the older adult experiencing alterations in health patterns.  Emphasis placed on multidimensional assessment factors and interventions in meeting biopsychsocial needs.

  
  • NURS 314 - Principles of Nursing Ethics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PHIL 210 , junior standing in Nursing, LPN or RN track)

    Addresses ethical issues in the clinical nursing practice of the professional nurse as care-giver, advocate, teacher, leader/manager.  The focus is on the decisions made regarding patient care. Three hours lecture.

  
  • NURS 344 - Forensic Health Care of Victims

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 110 )

    An overview of forensic health issues as they relate to victims of violent crimes, such as interfamilial violence, sexual violence, stalking, workplace violence, homicide and terrorism.   Content includes forensic roles, evidence collection and preservation, victim needs and rights, responses to trauma, victim’s resources, and death investigation.

  
  • NURS 345 - Forensic Health Care of Offenders

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 110 )

    An overview of forensic health issues as they relate to perpetrators of violent crimes, including interfamilial violence, sexual violence, stalking, workplace violence, homicide and terrorism.  Content includes forensic roles, crime classifications, relationship between animal cruelty and human violence, offender needs and rights, and juvenile offenders.

  
  • NURS 350 - Nursing Care of the Adult I

    5.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 210 , CHEM 110-111 , NURS 251 ; co-requisites: NURS 360  and NURS 352-352L )

    The first of three courses that focuses on physiological and psychological adaptation to dysfunctional health patterns.  Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and functional health patterns as a framework for practice.  Pathophysiology and nursing care related to alterations in oxygenation, perfusion and metabolism, and the perioperative experience are included.   Three hours lecture, 15 hours clinical lab/week (for seven weeks) alternate with NURS 352L .

  
  • NURS 352-352L - Mental Health Nursing (W - lab only)

    5.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 110-111 , BIOL 110 -111 , BIOL 210 , NURS 251 ; co-requisites:  NURS 360 , NURS 350 )

    The focus is on psychological adaptation to dysfunctional health patterns.  Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and functional health patterns as a framework for practice.  Psychopathology and nursing care of individuals and families experiencing alterations in mental health are explored.    Three hours lecture, 15 hours clinical lab/week (for seven weeks) alternate with NURS 350  lab.

  
  • NURS 360 - Pharmacology II

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: NURS 262 )

    Principles of pharmacology and specific drug groups related to alterations in the sleep-rest, activity-exercise, self-perception/self-concept health patterns.  Emphasis is placed on drug actions, side effects, dosages, and nursing responsibilities. (1.5 hr. lecture)

  
  • NURS 361 - Pharmacology III

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: NURS 360 )

    Principles of pharmacology and specific drug groups related to alterations in the nutrition-metabolic, sexuality-reproduction, role-relationship, cognitive-perceptual, and elimination health patterns.  Emphasis is placed on drug actions, side effects, dosages, and nursing responsibilities.  (1.5 hr. lecture)

  
  • NURS 371 - Nursing Care of the Adult II

    5.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 350 , NURS 352-352L , co-requisites: NURS 361 , NURS 373  or NURS 452  lab)

    The second of three courses that focus on physiological and psychological adaptation to dysfunctional health patterns.  Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and functional health patterns as a framework for practice.  Pathophysiology and nursing care related to alterations in metabolism, nutrition and immunity are included.  Three hours lecture, 15 hours clinical lab/week (for seven weeks) alternate with NURS 373  or NURS 452  lab.

  
  • NURS 373 - Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 350 , NURS 352-352L ); co-requisites: NURS 361 , NURS 371 )

    Focus is on the physiological and psychological adaptation to functional and dysfunctional health patterns in the child-bearing family.  Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and functional health patterns as a framework for practice.  Pathophysiology and nursing care related to childbearing, childbirth and their complications are addressed. Pathophysiological processes related to alterations in sexual health are also included.  Clinical experiences are designed to develop the professional nursing role of care giver, advocate and teacher in promoting and restoring health.  Three hours lecture, 12 hours clinical lab/week (for seven weeks) alternate with NURS 371  or NURS 450  lab taken fall senior year or spring junior year.

  
  • NURS 391 - Nursing Care of the Perioperative Patient

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: NURS 350 )

    This course presents concepts and information essential for perioperative nursing practice.  Content includes essentials and management of the patient’s surgical experience.  Precepted clinical experiences are provided in various phases of the perioperative experience and include preoperative, operative and post-anesthesia care.  Emphasis is placed on the development of beginning skills in the operative setting.  One credit lecture and two credits lab.

  
  • NURS 405 - Health Writing for Publication

    3 cr.


    (Cross-listed with NURS 505; open to all junior and senior students)

    This course enables students to enhance their writing skills by utilizing principles of effective writing as they relate to health issues.  Students select projects to develop from idea to polished manuscript for both a professional journal and a consumer newspaper/magazine.  Online, Web-based course.

  
  • NURS 410 - Nursing Management

    3 cr.
    Study of the management process in nursing settings with a focus on the planning, implementation and delivery of nursing care in complex organizations.  Focus is on the collaborative role of nursing within the organization and the analysis and resolution of problems. Three hours lecture.
  
  • NURS 450 - Nursing Care of the Adult III

    5.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 371 , NURS 373 , NURS 361 ; co-requisite: NURS 452 )

    This is the final course in a three-course sequence that focuses on physiological and psychological adaptation to dysfunctional health patterns.  Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and functional health patterns as a framework for practice.  Pathophysiology and nursing care related to alterations in mobility, elimination, cognition, and perception are included.  Three hours lecture, 15 hours clinical lab/week for seven weeks, alternate with NURS 452  or NURS 373  lab.

  
  • NURS 452 - Nursing Care of Children and Adolescents

    4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 350 , NURS 352-352L , NURS 361 ; co-requisite: NURS 371 )

    The focus is on the physiological adaptation to functional and dysfunctional health patterns in children and adolescents.  Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and functional health patterns as a frame-work for nursing practice.  Health promotion and the pathophysiology and nursing care related to the disorders of childhood are included.    Three hours lecture, nine hours clinical lab/week for seven weeks, alternate with NURS 450  lab or NURS 371  lab taken fall senior year or spring junior year.

  
  • NURS 471 - (D) Community Health Nursing

    3.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 450 , NURS 452 ; co-requisite: NURS 472 )

    The focus is on the professional nursing roles of care giver, advocate, teacher and leader/manager in promoting adaptive responses to functional and dysfunctional health patterns in individuals, families, communities and groups.  The student synthesizes prior knowledge of functional health patterns and all phases of the nursing process in meeting the health-care needs of community-based clients in diverse population settings.   1.5 hours lecture/week; 18 hours clinical lab/week for 4.5 weeks (alternate with NURS 472  and NURS 472  labs).

     

  
  • NURS 472 - Advanced Nursing Concepts

    6 cr. (3 lecture - 3 lab)


    (Prerequisites: NURS 450 , NURS 452 : co-requisite NURS 471 )

    This course examines the leadership process in nursing and correlates the process to safe, evidenced-based practice as it relates to physiological and psychological adaptations to complex dysfunctional health patterns. Continued use of the nursing process, informatics and evidence-based practice are emphasized.  Development of case management skills in collaboration with the interdisciplinary health team further develops the professional nursing role of caregiver, advocate, teacher, and leader/manager in promoting, restoring and maintaining health. Clinical experiences are designed to enhance leadership development in caring for patients with complex health issues.   Three hours/week lecture; 14 hours clinical lab/week for 9 weeks (alternate with NURS 471  lab). 

    The following option is available for ROTC Nurse cadets:  subject to annual review, 1.5 credits may be awarded for successful completion of the ROTC Nurse Summer Training Program (NSTP) in place of NURS 472A Lab.  Three hours/week lecture; 14 hours clinical lab/week for 4.5 weeks, alternate with NURS 471 and 472B labs.
     

  
  • NURS 474 - Nursing Leadership and Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 241 , NURS 242/242L , NURS 493 )

    This course is designed for Registered Nurses (RN) who are actively practicing clinical nursing.  The student will utilize critical thinking to synthesize theoretical concepts from nursing practice, education and research in the development of leadership behaviors.  One hour lecture (online format), two credits laboratory for a total of 70 precepted clinical hours over 15 weeks.

  
  • NURS 483 - Independent Study in Nursing

    3 cr.


    (RN students only; Prerequisites: senior standing in the Nursing program, NURS 493 )

    An independent project of academic or professional nature in an area specific to professional nursing.  Students develop and complete a specific project and work on a one-to-one basis with a faculty member in the Department of Nursing.

  
  • NURS 491 - Senior Seminar

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisites: NURS 450 , NURS 452 ; co-requisites:  NURS 471 , NURS 472 )

    This course will serve as a synthesis of critical concepts necessary for professional nursing practice.  The use of critical thinking as it is applied to solving problems in the delivery of nursing care to patients with complex illnesses is emphasized.  Through case study analysis and content synthesis, students will apply critical thinking skills to develop mastery of nursing concepts and principles of clinical nursing practice. Students will utilize computerized testing to gauge their knowledge of professional nursing content.

  
  • NURS 493 - Research in Nursing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: senior standing in Nursing, PSYC 210 )

    Introduction to and application of the principles and process of research in professional nursing practice.  Study of research design, data-collection techniques, interpretation and critique of nursing research, literature, and reports and the development of the ability to become a discriminating consumer of nursing research. Three hours lecture.

  
  • NURS 495 - (D) Health Care in Africa

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Completion of Junior level nursing courses)

    Exploration of health care and public health in Uganda.  Focus on endemic diseases: malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, malnutrition, tuberculosis, & HIV/AIDS.  Impact of environmental, social, cultural, and religious practices on health and wellness are examined.  Work with health care providers to examine preventative strategies & treatment of communicable diseases.  Travel to historical, cultural, ecological, and rural areas with an interdisciplinary student group. Intersession

  
  • NUTR 110 - (E) Introduction to Nutrition

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the interrelationship among nutrition, food and the environment as they impact health. Emphasis is placed on the multiple factors that influence food intake. The role and function of nutrients in health promotion and wellness throughout the life cycle will be discussed. (Credit cannot be earned for NUTR 101 and NUTR 110.)
  
  • NUTR 220 - Nutrition for the Health Care Professions

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 110 -111 , CHEM 110  or CHEM 112 ; pre- or co-requisite: CHEM 111  or CHEM 113 )

    Focus on concepts of nutrition, including chemistry, digestion absorption and metabolism of nutrients.  Exploration of the role of diet in chronic illness.  Basic nutrition concepts applied to the needs of individuals across the life span, families, and communities.

  
  • NUTR 350 - Nutrition through the Life Cycle

    3 cr.


    (Formerly EXSC 350) (Prerequisite: NUTR 110  or NUTR 220  or BIOL 255 )

    This course is based on the common organizational structure used in nutrition that begins with key nutrition concepts then moves to prevalence statistics, physiological principles, and then, nutrition needs and recommendations.  The needs addressed begin with preconception and then trace those needs through the aging process and is suitable for a variety of career goals.

  
  • OIM 351 - Introduction to Management Science

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: STAT 251 )

    A survey of quantitative techniques used to analyze and solve business problems.  Topics include linear programming methods, waiting line models, project scheduling, and simulation.   Emphasis is placed on model building and analysis using spreadsheet software.

  
  • OIM 352 - Introduction to Operations Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OIM 351 , STAT 252 )

    A functional view of how to manage the activities involved in the process of converting or transforming resources into products or services.  Topics include an overview of strategic decisions, forecasting, product design, process planning, facility layout, basic inventory models, capacity planning, aggregate planning and scheduling.

  
  • OIM 353 - Business Process Overview

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 104 )

    This is the first course in the area of enterprise management.  Students will learn to appreciate the integration of a company’s core business processes.  Students will be exposed to the main business processes that drive an organization, the interactions within and between them, and the effect of integration on the decision-making environment.  This course uses an enterprise-wide integrated information-systems software and simulated data for a model company.  (Credits may not be earned for OIM 353 and BUAD 351 .)

  
  • OIM 362 - Quality Management (None Writing Intensive)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: STAT 252 )

    The philosophy of Total Quality Management (TQM) and issues concerning its implementation are studied, covering the approaches of well-known leaders in the field, e.g., Deming. Topics include employee empowerment, quality-improvement tools, cross-functional teams, leadership for quality, statistical-process control, process capability, Taguchi methods, ISO 9000 standards, and the role of inspection in quality management.

     

     

     Course will be offered every other year.

  
  • OIM 363 - (W) Quality Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: STAT 252 )

    The philosophy of Total Quality Management (TQM) and issues concerning its implementation are studied, covering the approaches of well-known leaders in the field, e.g., Deming. Topics include employee empowerment, quality-improvement tools, cross-functional teams, leadership for quality, statistical-process control, process capability, Taguchi methods, ISO 9000 standards, and the role of inspection in quality management.

  
  • OIM 366 - (W) Supply Chain Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OIM 352  or permission of instructor)

    Many companies view Supply Chain Management as the core of their business strategy.  Students will learn how principles of Supply Chain Management integrate into the management of the enterprise and the business processes.  Students will examine the use of information technologies in Supply Chain Management.  Computer software will be used to gain hands-on experience.  (Credit cannot be earned for OIM 366 and EC 470 .)

  
  • OIM 462 - Project Management in Organizations

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: MGT 351 )

    This course will examine advanced project-management concepts from all phases of the project lifecycle (from requirements-specification through post-project assessment).  Special emphasis will be placed on understanding projects within the context of complex organizational settings by utilizing an open-systems perspective.  Linkages with more permanent administration structures within the organization will be reviewed.    (Credit cannot be earned for OIM 462 and MGT 462 .)

  
  • OIM 470 - Production Planning and Control

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OIM 352 )

    This course is concerned with the study of production planning and control activities in an enterprise resource-planning context.  Topics include forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master production scheduling, material requirements planning, production activity control, purchasing, inventory models, and Just-in-Time Systems.  The interactions between operations and the other functional areas of the business will be emphasized.

  
  • OIM 471 - Business Information Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 104 )

    Computers and how they can be applied to the operations and management of business firms.  Topics include data-processing concepts, overviews of computer hardware and software, modern data- and information-processing systems, applications of computers in business, acquiring and managing of computer and information resources.  Software packages will be used to gain hands-on experience.

  
  • OIM 472 - Electronic Business and Entrepreneurship

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor) 

    The course examines the issues related to the starting of new technology-based businesses.  It focuses on entrepreneurial traits, idea generation, entry strategies, marketing plans and development of business plans.  Venture capital and other forms of financing will also be covered. In addition there will be a discussion on legal and intellectual properties issues.  (Credit cannot be earned for OIM 472 and EC 472 .)

  
  • OIM 473 - Business Applications of Communication Networks

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: OIM 471  or permission of instructor)

    Students explore the use of computer and telecommunication networks to achieve organizational goals. Topics include data communications; planning and design of communication networks; data integrity, independence and security; client-server computing; global communication; the Internet; applications of telecommunication networks and current issues and future trends.  (Credit cannot be earned for OIM 473 and EC 473  and ACC 479 .)
  
  • OT 140 - Introduction to Occupational Therapy

    2 cr.
    An introduction to the profession of occupational therapy; its history, philosophical base, core values, professional standards, ethics, tools of practice, and frames of reference are presented. Employment settings, practitioner roles and professional development are explored, with particular emphasis placed on the student’s future role as an entry-level occupational therapist. Majors only.  One two-hour seminar/week.
  
  • OT 141 - Occupational Therapy Theoretical Concepts

    3 cr.
    An introduction to occupational therapy theories and models of practice, with emphasis on an analysis of their history, philosophical foundations, and applications to practice. The focus is on human occupation and adaptation, and its multicultural aspects. Three hours lecture/week, and ten hours of service learning.
  
  • OT 240 - Activity Analysis I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OT 141 )

    Analysis, theory, and application of activities and media used in occupational therapy treatment with children and adolescents.  Introduction to standardized and non-standardized tests to assist in selecting activities.  Principles of leading groups, adaptation, and grading activities addressed through active learning. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week, and ten hours of service learning.

  
  • OT 241 - Activity Analysis II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OT 240 )

    Analysis, theory, and application of activities and media used in occupational therapy treatment with adults.  Introduction to standardized and non-standardized tests to assist in selecting activities.  Proper documentation of treatment intervention addressed through case studies and problem-based learning. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week, and ten hours of service learning.

  
  • OT 256 - Human Anatomy for OT

    3 cr.


     (Prerequisites: BIOL 110 -111  with labs)

    A regional in-depth study of human anatomy with major emphasis on functional anatomy.  This will be accomplished through the study of prosected human specimens and surface anatomy. Three hours lecture, two hours lab/week.

  
  • OT 275 - Clinical Kinesiology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 110 -111  with labs; OT 256 )

    Application of the principles of functional anatomy with emphasis on normal and abnormal movement.  Measurement techniques for range of motion and muscle testing are presented, with emphasis on the movement and strength requirements found in self-care, work, and leisure activities.  Concepts are integrated in lab experiences. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week.

  
  • OT 346 - Pathological Conditions I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OT 256 )

    A review of pathological conditions seen in occupational therapy practice, including: diagnosis, etiology, progression, performance deficits, treatment, prognosis, and functional outcomes.  Emphasis is placed on examining developmental and pediatric disabilities.  The promotion of health, prevention, and implications for the individual, family, and society are discussed. Three hours lecture/week.

  
  • OT 347 - Pathological Conditions II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OT 256 , OT 346 )

    A review of pathological conditions seen in occupational therapy practice, including: diagnosis, etiology, progression, performance deficits, treatment, prognosis, and functional outcomes.  Emphasis placed on examining adult and geriatric conditions.  The promotion of health, prevention, and implications for the individual, family, and society are discussed. Three hours lecture/week.

  
  • OT 356 - Functional Neuroanatomy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 256 , OT 275 )

    An overview of applied neuroanatomy and function, with emphasis on sensory, perceptual, and motor performance.  Normal structure and function are discussed, together with nervous system dysfunction, as applied to self-care, work, and leisure activities related to OT practice. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week.

  
  • OT 360 - Occupational Therapy Practice I: Pediatrics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 240 , OT 241 , OT 275 )

    An overview of theoretical frames of reference, evaluation, and treatment intervention techniques used to enhance the function of infants, children, and other individuals with developmental disabilities.  Emphasis is placed on current recommended practices, evidence-based research, and clinical/educational experiential learning opportunities. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week, and ten hours of service learning.

  
  • OT 361 - Occupational Therapy Practice II: Psychosocial Rehabilitation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 240 , OT 241 ; co-requisite: CHS 341 )

    An overview of theoretical frames of reference, evaluation, and treatment intervention strategies used to enhance the function of individuals with psychosocial dysfunction.  Methods of clinical observation, assessment, and treatment approaches are introduced and practiced in lab simulations and field trips to area facilities. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week and ten hours of service learning.

  
  • OT 380 - Occupational Therapy Level I Clinical - I: Pediatrics

    1 cr.


     (Prerequisites: OT 346 , OT 356 , OT 360 )

    Directed observation and supervised participation in the occupational therapy process in a pediatric/developmental disabilities setting.  Emphasis on the integration of theory and practice. Intersession, two weeks, full time.

  
  • OT 381 - Occupational Therapy Level I Clinical - II: Psychosocial Rehabilitation

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisites OT 347 , OT 361 , OT 380 )

    Directed observation and supervised participation in the therapeutic process in a psychosocial rehabilitation setting. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory and practice. Summer, two weeks, full time.

  
  • OT 393 - (W) Research Methods in Occupational Therapy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 210 )

    This course provides an introduction to understanding how professionals contribute to the knowledge base that supports the field of occupational therapy. The student learns the language of scientific inquiry and how to critically examine research-based literature. The guiding principles that support sound research practices are examined throughout the course.

  
  • OT 440 - Management and Supervision of Occupational Therapy Services

    3 cr.
    An application of major management principles to the provision of occupational therapy services with an emphasis on the administrative and supervisory requirements in managing an occupational therapy department. Information provided concerning program planning, recruitment, marketing, budgeting, supervision, documentation, evaluation, reimbursement, and quality assurance. Three hours lecture/week.
  
  • OT 451 - Hand Rehabilitation

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 256 , OT 275 , OT 356 )

    An in-depth review of the functional anatomy of the hand and arm, with emphasis on rehabilitation principles and basic splinting techniques.  Theoretical concepts, evaluation, and fabrication procedures are integrated in lab experiences. One hour lecture, two hours lab/week.

  
  • OT 460 - Occupational Therapy Practice III: Physical Rehabilitation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 256 , OT 275 , OT 346 , OT 347 , OT 356 , OT 360 , OT 361 , OT 380 , OT 381 )

    A study of the occupational therapist’s complex role in providing services to individuals with physical dysfunction.  Theoretical frames of reference and various intervention approaches are integrated as techniques and strategies to enhance functional performance are introduced, observed and practiced. Emphasis on safe clinical practice and development of sound clinical reasoning skills. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week and ten hours of service learning.

  
  • OT 461 - (D) Occupational Therapy Practice IV: Geriatrics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 346 , OT 347 , OT 356 , OT 460 )

     An overview of frames of reference, evaluations, and interventions used to enhance elder’s well-being. Emphasis is placed on understanding the biopsychosocial changes and environmental contexts of elders.  The ability to provide holistic and humanistic elder care is facilitated through lab simulations, completion of a program needs assessment, and via service learning. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week and ten hours of service learning.

  
  • OT 475 - Advanced Therapeutic Techniques

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: OT 451 , OT 460 , OT 480 )

    An in-depth examination of selected concepts and approaches in physical rehabilitation, with an introduction to certain specialized areas of occupational therapy practice.  Topics will include standardized assessments, industrial rehabilitation, pain and soft tissue management, neurodevelopmental treatment, adaptive positioning and seating, cognitive-perceptual rehabilitation, and reimbursement issues. Two hours lecture, two hours lab/week.

  
  • OT 480 - Occupational Therapy Level I Clinical – III: Physical Rehabilitation

    1 cr.


     (Prerequisites: OT 381 , OT 451 , OT 460 )

    Directed observation and supervised participation in the therapeutic process in a physical rehabilitation setting.  Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory and practice. Intersession, two weeks, full time.

  
  • OT 494 - (W) Evidence Based Research

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 210 , OT 393 )

    This course provides an in-depth study of evidence-based practice. It is a course for occupational therapy students designed to develop essential skills for conducting evidence-based research.  It includes the basic steps of the evidence-based practice process and how to apply those steps to examine clinical questions.

  
  • OT 501 - Leadership in Occupational Therapy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: OT 581  or OT 582 )

    Extensive analysis of the profession’s historical influences, current, and emerging trends in occupational therapy leadership, and possibilities for personal leadership evolution.   Emphasis is placed upon examining the link between professional ethics, personal values, and leadership.   Systemic challenges to ethical leadership and professional supports for sustaining ethical practice are presented. Three hours lecture/week.

 

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