Feb 28, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • CMPS 144 - Computer Science II

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 134 , Co-requisite MATH 114  or MATH 142 )

    This course emphasizes object-oriented software development, addressing both software engineering and programming.  Topics include modularization, abstraction, encapsulation/information hiding, software reuse, software testing, classic data abstractions (e.g., lists, trees) and algorithms (e.g., sorting, searching), recursion, program correctness, and basic algorithm analysis.

  
  • CMPS 204 - Computer Forensics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 102 /C/IL 102L  or its equivalent)

    An introduction to the field of computer forensics emphasizing the collection and analysis of both persistent and volatile data from computer systems, networks, and storage media in a manner that is admissible in a court of law.  May not be used as a major elective for any major in the Computing Sciences Department.

  
  • CMPS 240 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 144 )

    An examination of the issues of data representation, algorithm structure, and encapsulation as they pertain to the development of object-oriented software.  Abstract data types studied include stacks, queues, binary trees, n-ary trees, and graphs. Various representation alternatives are analyzed and compared, trade-offs frequently encountered by software developers are discussed.

  
  • CMPS 250 - Machine Organization and Assembly Language Programming

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 144 )

    An introductory study of the organization and architecture of computers through an exploration of various virtual machines. Programming at the assembly-language level and interfacing with software components (primarily written in C). Topics include representation of data and instructions, computer arithmetic, memory hierarchies, instruction sets, addressing modes, digital logic, microprogramming, pipelining, and parallel processing.

  
  • CMPS 260 - Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240 )

    An examination of the fundamental models and concepts of computation – automata, formal languages, and grammars – and how they are related.  Church-Turing thesis; recursive and recursively enumerable sets; unsolvable problems; complexity of algorithms; Chomsky hierarchy.

  
  • CMPS 312 - Web Technology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: C/IL 102  or equivalent, COMM 329 , IT 354 )

    This course covers the fundamental aspects of developing and maintaining Web sites. It provides a thorough coverage of the structure and elements of HTML and JavaScript necessary to create commercial-quality Web sites.  Brief coverage will also be given to graphic design and multimedia content. Emphasis will be placed on client-side development although server-side issues will be considered.  May not be used as part of any major in the Computing Sciences Department.  Cannot be taken by a student who has credit for IT 120  or CMPS 356 .

  
  • CMPS 330 - (W) Information Systems Analysis

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 102 /C/IL 104  or CMPS 134 )

    Introduction to concepts and practices of information processing.  Computerized system requirements and techniques in providing appropriate decision-making information to management.

  
  • CMPS 331 - Information Systems Development

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 330 )

    A study of system-development methodology and the role played by the systems analyst in developing user-accepted information systems.

  
  • CMPS 340 - File Processing

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 144  required, CMPS 240  recommended)

    File structures concepts and file processing applications.  Topics include file maintenance and storage management; file searching, sorting, and merging; consequential processing; index structures; B-trees; hash tables; indexed sequential files; database concepts.

  
  • CMPS 341 - Database Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 340  required, CMPS 240  recommended)

    An introduction to database management systems with an emphasis on relational database design and applications.  It uses an appropriate database package such as ORACLE or PostgreSQL.

  
  • CMPS 344 - Programming Languages

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240 )

    A study of programming languages from both the theoretical and practical perspectives.  A survey of major and developing paradigms and languages is undertaken which includes use of specific languages to broaden the student’s experience.  Implementation is studied through an introduction to language translation along with a study of run-time models and interfaces with virtual machines.

  
  • CMPS 350 - Computer Architecture

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 250 )

    A study of the logical structure of computer-system organization including a survey of logic and design with an emphasis on functional components.  Topics include instruction sets, hard-wired and microprogrammed control-unit designs, memory systems (caches and virtual memory), I/O systems (interrupts, DMA, and channels).  Overview and examples of alternative and advanced computer architectures (pipeline, array processors, multiprocessors).

  
  • CMPS 352 - Operating Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 240 , CMPS 250 )

    An introduction to the principles of operating systems.  Topics include operating system structure, process management, scheduling and dispatching, process synchronization and interprocess communication, memory management, virtual memory, device management, I/O, and file systems.

  
  • CMPS 354 - Data Communications and Networks

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 352 )

    A study of data communication and networking concepts, including distributed-system architectures, electronic interfaces, data-transmission, data link protocols, terminal networks, computer communication, public-data networks, and local-area networks.

  
  • CMPS 355 - Mobile Application Development

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: CMPS 352 )

    This course deals with the development of software for mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets.  Topics include, but are not limited to, graphical user interface design, event-driven software model, resource management, interfacing with sensors, concurrency, database access, and networking.
  
  • CMPS 356 - Web Programming

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 240 , HTML experience to the level where the students are capable of developing their own Web page)

    This course covers all aspects of programming on the World Wide Web.  This includes the presentation of HTML, Java, JavaScript and CGI.  Topics include advanced HTML (maps, forms, etc.) client-server programming basics as they relate to the Web, Java machine concepts, Java/JavaScript similarities and differences, server-side programming, GIF animations, Web programming resources and environments. (Students may not earn credit for CMPS 356 and IT 356 .)

  
  • CMPS 358 - Real-Time Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 352 )

    A study of issues related to systems that interface with the physical world and must meet the timing constraints imposed on them.  Topics include: real-time hardware architecture, real-time operating systems, invoking and managing threads and processes, interprocess communications and synchronization, manipulating process priority, concurrent programming, exception handling, software safety, reliability, and fault tolerance.

  
  • CMPS 360 - Analysis of Algorithms

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240 )

    A survey of methods for designing and analyzing algorithms. Classic algorithms from graph theory, combinatorics and text processing are examined, as are traditional design strategies such as divide-and-conquer, backtracking and dynamic programming.  Other topics include NP-completeness and parallel algorithms.

  
  • CMPS 362 - Numerical Analysis

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 134 , MATH 222 )

    A survey of numerical methods for solving equations, integration, differentiation, interpolation, differential equations, and linear algebra, and the analysis of error.

  
  • CMPS 364 - Theory of Computation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 260 )

    The development of a theoretical notion of computability and its relationship to Turing computability and recursive functions; the study of the relationships between automata, formal languages and grammars.

  
  • CMPS 370 - Computer Graphics

    3 cr.


     (Prerequisite: CMPS 240  and CMPS 250 )

    An introduction to the hardware, software and techniques used to generate graphical representations by computer.  Two and three dimensional concepts, algorithms and architectures are studied. An essential aspect of the course involves the development of programs utilizing appropriate APIs (currently OpenGL is emphasized) as a means of developing expertise.  Advanced topics may be pursued as appropriate.

  
  • CMPS 372 - Artificial Intelligence

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240 )

    Problem solving using expert systems, heuristic programming techniques, tree speed-up techniques, and learning mechanisms.

  
  • CMPS 374 - (W) Fundamentals of Software Engineering

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240 )

    An introduction to the concepts of Software Engineering.  Stress is placed upon formal models for the design and development of high-quality software.  Topics include: project planning, requirements analysis, system design, program design, program implementation, program testing, system testing, system delivery, and maintenance.  A group project will be included.

  
  • CMPS 376 - Rapid Prototyping

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 136  or CMPS 144 )

    Some common applications using a database with a visual interface (perhaps Web based) can be successfully treated using Rapid Prototyping (a.k.a. Rapid Application Development).   This course will cover the synergy of combining a visual language and a relational database employing rigorous design techniques.

  
  • CMPS 384 - Special Topics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: as published) 

    Some recent courses have covered Rapid Prototyping, Real-Time Systems, and Parallel Computing.  A syllabus including prerequisites is published prior to the registration period for the course.

  
  • CMPS 393 - Computer Research

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: departmental permission) 

    A research project carried out by a student under the direction of a faculty member in the department.  The results will be prepared in a form suitable for publication.  Reader fee.

  
  • CMPS 440 - Compiler Design

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 344 )

    Study of techniques and problems involved in constructing compilers.  Lexical analysis, syntax analysis, semantic analysis, symbol-table management, code generation, code optimization.

  
  • CMPS 481 - Computer Internship

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: departmental permission) 

    An extensive job experience in computing which carries academic credit.  Prior approval is required; information is available on the department Web site.

  
  • CMPS 490 - (W) Computer Projects

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: senior standing, departmental permission) 

    In this course, students prepare and present individual computer projects to be evaluated by the instructor and their fellow students.

  
  • CNS 101 - (CF) Beginning Chinese

    3 cr.


     

    A learner-based, performance-based and task-based approach to Chinese, this course focuses on the development of the students’ ability to comprehend and communicate in the Chinese language.  It provides training in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Introduces aspects of Chinese culture.   Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  • CNS 102 - (CF) Beginning Chinese

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: CNS 101  is normally the prerequisite to CNS102)

    A learner-based, performance-based and task-based approach to Chinese, this course focuses on the development of the students’ ability to comprehend and communicate in the Chinese language. It provides training in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Introduces aspects of Chinese culture.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  • CNS 211 - (CF) Intermediate Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 101 -CNS 102  or equivalent, as determined by instructor)

    Emphasizes development of the full range of language skills – reading, listening comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication.  Class will be conducted almost entirely in Chinese.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  • CNS 212 - (CF) Intermediate Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 101 -CNS 102  or equivalent, as determined by instructor; CNS 211  or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212)

    Emphasizes development of the full range of language skills – reading, listening comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication.  Class will be conducted almost entirely in Chinese.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  • CNS 311 - (CF,D) Advanced Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 211 -CNS 212  or equivalent, as determined by instructor)

    An integrated, learner-focused course that develops reading, writing, listening and speaking along with cultural competency.  Conducted only in Chinese.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  • CNS 312 - (CF,D) Advanced Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 211 -CNS 212  or equivalent and consent of instructor; CNS 311  or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 312)

    An integrated, learner-focused course that develops reading, writing, listening and speaking along with cultural competency.  Conducted only in Chinese.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources. 

  
  • COA 160 - Coaching Principles

    1 cr.


    (Formerly PHED 160)

    This course will assist prospective coaches as they develop a positive coaching philosophy, learn established coaching principles and methods, and acquire sport management skills.  The course uses the American Sport Education Program (ASEP) Coaching Principles curriculum leading to the ASEP coach certification which satisfies many state competency standards for coaches.  The course is open to non-coaching minor students.

  
  • COA 202 - Sports Administration

    3 cr.


    (Formerly PHED 202)

    Examines the business of coaching, offering practical approaches to the administrative functions of organizing, planning, leading and controlling. Integrates philosophy and principles into practice.

  
  • COA 203 - Sport First Aid

    1 cr.


    (Formerly PHED 161)

    This course will provide prospective coaches with an understanding of a coaches’ role on the athletic health care team, sports injury terminology, and the first-aid care for common athletic injuries.  The course uses the American Sport Education Program (ASEP) Sports First Aid curriculum leading to the ASEP Sport First Aid certification and is open to non-coaching minor students.

  
  • COA 205 - Teaching Sports Skills

    3 cr.


    (Formerly PHED 205)

    Students will master the essentials of teaching sports skills and improve their teaching effectiveness. They will learn how to prepare for teaching sports skills, how to introduce, explain, and demonstrate sports skills and use cognitive processes to improve performance.

  
  • COA 208 - Conditioning and Training for Sports

    3 cr.


    (Formerly PHED 210, PHED 208)

    Students will learn how to design effective, individualized training programs by incorporating training basics such as overload, specificity, adaptation and progression.  Will include individual differences among athletes, muscular fitness, energy fitness and performance factors.

  
  • COMM 100 - (FYOC) Public Speaking

    3 cr.
    This is a performance class which emphasizes the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches.  Successful completion of COMM 100 or INTD 117  with a grade of C or better fulfills the public speaking requirement in the University’s General Education curriculum. (INTD 117  also fulfills the basic writing requirement.)
  
  • COMM 101 - Communication and Society

    3 cr.
    This course has been designed to help students understand the communication discipline.  It provides an overview of communication theory/effects and explores the fields of journalism, radio, television, public relations and advertising, including the history and practice of these professions and their impact on contemporary society.
  
  • COMM 108 - (FYW) Essential Writing Skills

    3 cr.
    This course enhances foundational writing abilities and reviews grammar/style using the Associated Press Stylebook standards.  In addition, students will explore both well-written and appropriate essays/articles and careless or unethical written expression in the media.  Earning a grade of C or better fulfills EP Level I: First-Year Writing GE requirement.
  
  • COMM 109 - G/S/P Skill Set

    1 cr.
    This self-directed course contains multiple tutorials on American English rules of grammar, spelling and punctuation that are the necessary foundations of written and oral communication.  These components will be emphasized in advanced courses within the major. Students must pass a G/S/P exam with a grade of 70 or higher to enroll in core communication courses.  It is recommended that students complete this course prior to the second semester of their Junior year.
  
  • COMM 110 - Interpersonal Communication

    3 cr.
    An investigation and analysis of the process and nature of human communication and its intrapersonal and interpersonal attributes.
  
  • COMM 115 - (W) Writing for Communication

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: WRTG 107  or fulfillment of Writing Skills requirement)

    An introduction to the major forms of writing for communication professions: corporate, print, radio/television production, public relations and advertising.  Students will focus on the development and improvement of writing, research and critical thinking skills.  Students must take and pass a grammar exam as part of the course.

  
  • COMM 130 - History of Electronic Media

    3 cr.
    The content of the course will address many humanities-based topics as they are related to mass media.  Such topics include media history, media technologies and their effects on cultural practices, economic structures of mass communication, media programming, and the role of media in society.
  
  • COMM 210 - (W) Logical and Rhetorical Analysis

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in COMM 115 )

    A study of the principles of logic and persuasion, analysis of fallacies, and critical examination of the principles of structure in written and oral communication.  Practice in briefs and abstracts with an emphasis on precision and clarity.

  
  • COMM 211 - Argumentation and Debate

    3 cr.
    This course concentrates on the techniques of argumentation, persuasion, debate, and forensics.  Focuses heavily on research, case construction and formal analysis.
  
  • COMM 214 - Small Group Communication

    3 cr.
    An examination of research, techniques, and principles of small-group communication.  Topics include problem solving, decision making, conflict resolution, leadership theories, interaction strategies and participant roles.
  
  • COMM 215 - Introduction to Communication Theory

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in COMM 115 )

    Introduces the rich body of theory and research in human communication.  Students will examine theories from the traditional contexts of the field: interpersonal, small group, public, organizational, mass media, intercultural and gender.  An emphasis is on applying the various theories to students’ communicative lives.

  
  • COMM 221 - Radio Production

    3 cr.
    An examination of the dynamic industry roles of the radio producer/director.  Areas to be studied include production theory and techniques that apply to station and program promotions, advertising, news, and music formats.
  
  • COMM 222 - Television Production

    3 cr.
    Designed to provide both theoretical background and practical application of television production in and outside the studio.  Various format types, production techniques and artistic styles are studied.  Opportunity for producing and directing television programs.
  
  • COMM 223 - Radio Journalism

    3 cr.


     (Prerequisite: COMM 221  or COMM 224  or COMM 328 )

    With a focus on gathering and preparing news for broadcast (concentrating especially on interviewing techniques), this class will investigate various news formats and styles.  At the mid-semester point, the class will begin operating as a news team.

  
  • COMM 224 - (W) News Writing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 115 )

    Evaluating news, reporting and writing stories.  Newsroom organization.  Style and usage. Interviewing.  Feature writing.

  
  • COMM 225 - Advertising

    3 cr.
    This course explores advertising as an institution in society, utilizing research, media planning, and creative strategies.  Students will participate in the formulation of an advertising campaign.
  
  • COMM 226 - Strategic Writing for Public Relations

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: COMM 115 )

    Writing and editing of public relations and marketing communication materials such as press releases, speeches, direct mail, brochures, newsletter and Web sites.  Writing and editing for electronic media and video news.  Emphasis on integrated communications.

  
  • COMM 227 - Contemporary Public Relations

    3 cr.
    Principles of the professional practice of modern public relations.  Concepts of planning and executing effective communication strategies including message design and distribution for any organization.
  
  • COMM 228 - (D) Intercultural Communication

    3 cr.
    Designed to provide a framework for understanding diversity in communication patterns among cultures and co-cultures.  Topics include high- and low-context patterns, verbal and non-verbal communication across cultures and co-cultures, persuasion, dialects, organization of verbal codes and the structure of conversations.
  
  • COMM 229 - (D) Gender and Communication

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on interactive relationships between gender and communication in contemporary American society by examining the multiple ways communication in families, schools, media and society in general creates and perpetuates gender roles.  The course considers not only what is in terms of gender roles, but also what might be and how students, as change agents, may act to improve their individual and collective lives.
  
  • COMM 240 - (Q) Communications Research Methods

    3 cr.
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to communication research methodologies/applications, including measurement, sampling, focus groups, interviews, survey and experiment, in addition to data collection and analysis.  Students will gain an understanding of basic statistical procedures and research methods in the various fields of mass communication through lectures and hands-on assignments.
  
  • COMM 245 - (D) Race & Gender Stereotypes in TV & Film

    3 cr.
    This course will examine the evolution of race and gender stereotypes depicted in TV and film from the 1960’s to the current day.  We will examine the impact of the civil rights and feminist movements by viewing films and TV shows and analyze the significance of these changes on American society.
  
  • COMM 250 - Principle Communication Competencies

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: COMM 100  or completion of an EP Foundation course & completion of COMM 115  or instructor/department chair permission)

    This course provides a practical blend of writing, speaking, interpersonal, small group and organizational communication concepts to foster an understanding of relating, collaborating and presenting in the professional arena.  Necessary competencies for formal and informal leadership provide the framework for examining communication skills in the workplace.

  
  • COMM 310 - Mass Communication Law

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: junior or senior standing) 

    Analysis and examination of statutory laws, congressional legislation and federal rules and regulations governing the mass media in the United States.  Focus on the First Amendment, libel and slander, privacy, copyright, free press/fair trial, obscenity, advertising, antitrust and monopoly, taxation and licensing.

  
  • COMM 311 - Political Communication

    3 cr.
    The study of rhetorical strategies used by the modern politician.  Examination of the evolution of American political rhetoric, focusing upon language, message development, audience analysis, and the influence of modern mass media in shaping political discourse.
  
  • COMM 312 - Organizational Communication

    3 cr.
    The study of communication behaviors, patterns, and strategies in organizations.  Topics include power and politics, organizational cultures, conflict management, decision-making, diversity, and leadership.  Historical and contemporary theories of organizing are examined and critiqued from a communication perspective.
  
  • COMM 313 - Nonverbal Communication

    3 cr.
    A study of the nonverbal aspects of human interaction.  Topics include impression management, social influence, form and function in design, proxemics, kinesics, and the symbolic environment.
  
  • COMM 314 - Legal Communication

    3 cr.
    An examination of specific skills needed to promote effective and meaningful communication by the legal professional and the interface with clients, juries, judges and the non-legal public.
  
  • COMM 315 - The Art of the Pitch

    3 cr.
    This course teaches students the theory and application of persuasive communication.  Students will learn the art of crafting persuasive messages using various techniques and technologies associated with verbal, non-verbal and visual communication.  Students will engage in a series of increasingly sophisticated presentations reflecting industry methodology and standards.
  
  • COMM 316 - Communication Ethics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in COMM 115 )

    This course will consider the need for and applications of proper standards by those in today’s media. It will also focus on the media’s responsibility to be aware of the public they serve.  Different faculty may approach this course from various ethical/humanistic perspectives.

  
  • COMM 317 - Digital Audio and Video Production

    3 cr.
    This course will provide an introduction to producing audio and video content for new technologies such as the Web and digital publication formats.  Students will use digital recording and editing equipment to produce projects suitable for new technologies.
  
  • COMM 318 - Multi-Media Presentations

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: COMM 317 )

    The principles and practices of speaker delivery style when using multimedia to present a message.  Message construction and audience analysis will also be emphasized.
  
  • COMM 319 - Sports Writing

    3 cr.
    An overview of sport journalism including the history of sports journalism, how to conduct sports interviews, sports reporting techniques and how to write game stories, features and columns.
  
  • COMM 320 - News Reporting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: COMM 115  and COMM 224 )

    This course is designed to introduce students to reporting for electronic and print media.  Students learn how to obtain and analyze documents used in criminal/civil investigations, as well as how to develop and maintain contacts in news investigations.

  
  • COMM 322 - Advanced Television Production

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 222 )

    Building upon the foundation acquired in COMM 222, students pursue specialized projects in producing and directing programs for broadcast, cable and new technologies.

  
  • COMM 323 - Television Journalism

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 224  or COMM 328 )

    Broadcast- journalism skills are refined through classroom and outside assignments.  Production techniques, including tape editing, are explored.  Television news formats are produced.

  
  • COMM 324 - (W) Advanced Newswriting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 224 )

    Intensive training and practice in techniques of reporting and writing news stories and in covering public affairs. Familiarity with journalistic basics and style required.

  
  • COMM 325 - Advertising Copywriting

    3 cr.
    Students develop two separate creative campaign strategies for hypothetical clients of their own choosing.  For these large-budget accounts, students must create copy with a consistent campaign theme.
  
  • COMM 326 - Political Advertising

    3 cr.
    Critical examination of rhetorical strategies used in 20th- century political campaigning.  Case studies and student projects focus on the special uses of broadcast and print media in political advertising.
  
  • COMM 327 - Cases in Strategic Public Relations

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 227 )

    Case studies focus on the problems and challenges faced by a variety of organizations.  Practical application of creative problem-solving, theory and research in actual organizations.

  
  • COMM 328 - News Editing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 224 )

    Preparing copy for publication.  Correcting, improving and trimming stories. Headline writing, layout, graphics.  Wire services, printing process.

  
  • COMM 329 - Graphics

    3 cr.
    Visual aspects of print media.  Typography, printing presses, handling photos and other art layout and design, introduction to desktop publishing.
  
  • COMM 330 - Advertising Decision Making

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 225 )

    This course will cover the managerial and decision-making processes of advertising and related marketing communications functions.  Students will learn the various problems and opportunities faced by advertising decision makers, and the alternative solutions available to handle these situations.

  
  • COMM 331 - Mass Media Management

    3 cr.
    The multi-faceted roles of managers in the various communication industries are examined.  Special attention is given to technical, conceptual and humanistic concerns.  Specific areas of study include management of self and personal relations, unions and contracts, community relations, audience analysis and measurement.
  
  • COMM 334 - Broadcast Programming

    3 cr.
    Study of programming strategies, practices, and operations of commercial radio and television stations.  Topics include audience research, program acquisitions, scheduling, formats, syndication, promotion, and network-affiliate relationships.
  
  • COMM 380 - Advertising Practicum

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 225  or COMM 325 )

    Students function as a full-service advertising agency that provides clients with a complete array of services ranging from campaign creation to implementation and evaluation.

  
  • COMM 411 - Persuasion and Propaganda

    3 cr.
    An in-depth examination of the theoretical foundations and practical applications of those factors which influence the persuasibility of target audiences.  Topics include attitudes, beliefs, values, behaviors, appeals and reference groups.
  
  • COMM 415 - Senior Seminar

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: senior standing, A grade of C or higher in COMM 115 )

    This capstone course will synthesize course work to prepare students for entry into the profession of communication.  Emphasis will be placed on the application of Jesuit ideals to the identification and approaches that concerns today’s communication industry.

  
  • COMM 422 - Educational Television

    3 cr.
    Instructional uses of the television medium by public television stations, schools, closed-circuit and cable systems.  Types of educational programs are evaluated.  Students work on preparing projects that may reflect their own pedagogical interests.
  
  • COMM 425 - Cable Television

    3 cr.
    A study of cable television and its development and current place in the telecommunications industry.  Topics include programming strategies, formats, multiple-system operators, independents, syndication, sales, satellite services, pay-per-view, audience ratings, management and the franchising process.  Students develop their own research proposals for establishing new cable channels, networks and services.
  
  • COMM 426 - International Broadcasting

    3 cr.
    Comparative analysis of national and international media systems throughout the world.  Emphasis on their origin, development and operation.
  
  • COMM 428 - Public Relations Campaigns and Competitions

    1.5 – 6 cr.
    This advanced course gives students the opportunity to develop communication projects for various audiences both on and off campus.  These projects will then be entered into competitions.
  
  • COMM 433 - Television Criticism

    3 cr.
    This course will use students’ critical skills to comment on television programming through reviews and critical analyses of individual shows.  By studying the techniques used to produce television programs, students will develop the skills needed to analyze the content and structure of programs.  Another factor to be discussed is the changing environment of program delivery through new technology and what impact this may have on content.
  
  • COMM 460 - Advertising Competition

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: COMM 225  and COMM 330 )

    Students function as part of an advertising agency and create an advertising campaign for presentation to the client and the judges at the National Student Advertising Competition sponsored by the American Advertising Federation.  This is a two semester course, which serves as a capstone for the Advertising track.

  
  • COMM 480 - Television Practicum

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: COMM 222 , COMM 322 )

    Communication seniors undertake significant projects resulting in broadcast-quality projects suitable for airing by commercial or non-commercial television stations, radio stations or cable systems.

  
  • COMM 481 - Internship

    3-6 cr.


    (Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, appropriate course work, faculty approval) 

    Highly recommended for every major, this on-the-job experience is guided by practitioners in the communication field and supervised individually by a faculty member in consultation with the student’s advisor and the department chair. (Internship credits can only be used in the free elective area.)

  
  • COMM 482 - Directed Independent Study

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: senior standing) 

    In consultation with the student’s advisor and department chair, Communication Seniors undertake a significant area of study resulting in a major research paper. Students select a Communication professor whom they wish to direct the study.  Provided to augment an area of the student’s interest not substantially covered in available departmental courses.

  
  • COMM 484 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    In-depth departmental seminars on selected communication topics meeting the needs and interests of students. Topics vary from semester to semester.
  
  • COMM 499 - Senior Thesis

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: COMM 215  and COMM 316 )

    An optional research-based written project in which Communication seniors (in consultation with their advisor and department chair) select an issue or problem for scholarly study, undertake significant and meaningful research, and produce a major paper of publishable quality.  Students select a Communication professor whom they wish to direct their thesis.   Strongly recommended for students planning for graduate school.

  
  • DEPT 385H-389H - Honors Tutorial

    3 cr.
    An exploration of a topic on an individually directed basis.
 

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