Dec 04, 2021  
Undergraduate Catalog 2020-2021 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2020-2021 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Psychology Department Courses


Psychology

Go to information for this department.

Courses

Psychology

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    HD 224 - Family Development

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 110 )

    This course will explore the reciprocal interactions among children and parents as related to the development of all individuals in the family.  Topics covered include the roles of family members, parenthood and marriage, parenting at specific developmental stages, families with single parents, families with exceptional children, and child abuse.    Not regularly scheduled.

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    HD 325 - Abnormal Child Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , PSYC 225 )

    This course considers atypical social, emotional, and mental development during childhood and adolescence.  Topics include intellectual disability, giftedness, learning disorders, psychopathology of childhood and adolescence, and conduct disorders. Offered alternating years.

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    HD 334 - Couple and Family Therapy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , PSYC 225 )

    An introduction to the theory, research, and practice of couple-counseling and family therapy.  Topics include family dysfunctions, assessment methods, treatment approaches, innovative techniques, and research findings.  Not regularly scheduled.  (Credit cannot be earned for both PSYC 334  and HD 334.)

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    PSYC 105 - (E) Brain and Human Nature

    3 cr.
    An examination of the human mind, brain and why we are the way we are. Topics include the mind-body problem, the nature of consciousness, the evolution of behavior, addictions (e.g., love), eating disorders, depression, and aggression. (Credit cannot be earned for this course and PSYC 231  or NEUR 231 ; not open to Psychology majors or minors.)
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    PSYC 106 - (E) Drugs and Behavior

    3 cr.
    This course will examine interactions between drugs and behavior. Behavioral topics will include: tolerance, addiction, learning, aggression, sexual behavior, eating, anxiety, depression and schizophrenia. Drug/drug categories will include: alcohol, cannabis, opiates, antidepressants and anti-anxiety. (Credit cannot be earned for PSYC 106 and PSYC 339  or NEUR 339 ; not open to Psychology majors or minors.)
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    PSYC 110 - (S) Fundamentals of Psychology

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the scientific study of behavior through a survey of psychology’s principal methods, content areas and applications. Course requirements include participation in psychological research studies and preparation of short article reviews.
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    PSYC 140 - (FYOC,FYDT) Current Topics in Psychological Science

    3 cr.
    Psychological science relates directly to collective social behavior and to the human condition. This course introduces students to the process of using psychological science and civil discourse to address contemporary topics of societal importance.
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    PSYC 210 - (Q) Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences

    3 cr.
    Basic statistics in the behavioral sciences, including organization and display of data; measures of central tendency; variability; correlation and regression; one- and two-sample t-tests; confidence intervals, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, chi-square; and consideration of effect size, power, and null hypothesis testing including types of errors. Will include an introduction to computerized statistical-analysis package/s.
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    PSYC 211 - Research Methods and Statistical Analysis I

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110  and Psychology major or instructor permission)

    The PSYC 211-212  sequence introduces the research methods and analytic techniques used in psychology by taking an integrated approach to method and analysis. PSYC 211 introduces the history of science in psychology, the logic of scientific research, scientific ethics hypothesis testing, data collection, and descriptive, observational, and correlational methods.  Statistical techniques include data organization, central tendency, variability, correlation, regression, chi-square, z-scores, probability, and confidence interval. Students will gain hands-on experience in research design, data collection, and analysis through lab activities and with statistical software.

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    PSYC 212 - (EPW) Research Methods and Statistical Analysis II

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 211  or instructor permission)

    The PSYC 211 -212 sequence introduces the research methods and analytic techniques used in psychology by taking an integrated approach to method and analysis. PSYC 212 continues where PSYC 211  ended, by reintroducing the logic of hypothesis testing and introducing experimental and quasi-experimental methods in psychology. Statistical techniques include t-tests, one-way and factorial analysis of variance, measures of effect size, and power. Students will gain hands-on experience in research design, data collection, and analysis through lab activities and with statistical software.

     

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    PSYC 220 - (S) Social Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Social determinants of behavior from a psychological perspective. Topics include liking, love, conformity, persuasion, attitude change, and person perception.

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    PSYC 224 - (S) Personality and Individual Differences

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    A survey of scientific theory and research on human variation in personality and other behavioral domains.

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    PSYC 225 - (S) Abnormal Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    A comprehensive survey of mental and behavioral disorders from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. The course will consider diagnosis and labeling, overview of specific disorders, and various treatment approaches.

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    PSYC 226 - (S) Lifespan Development: Cognitive and Biological

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    This course will consider cognitive development across the human lifespan, including memory, perception, attention, intelligence, executive function, and language.  The biology of development from the prenatal environment to death, along with physical growth, will also be discussed.

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    PSYC 227 - (S) Lifespan Development: Social and Emotional

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit.)

    This course will survey social and emotional development across the human lifespan. It will consider the development of emotions, morality, and gender roles, and the contexts in which that development occurs. Social aspects of the aging process and information on child and elder abuse will also be covered.

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    PSYC 228 - Health Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 110 )

    An overview of health psychology and its professional activities. Topics include methods of health promotion and disease prevention, theories of health behavior change, a biopsychosocial approach to treating chronic illnesses, stress/coping processes, pain management, social factors that affect health and illness, and the role of psychologists in integrated healthcare.

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    PSYC 230 - Sensation and Perception

    3-4 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Concerns the study of sensory mechanisms and perceptual phenomena. Optional lab entails supervised individual experimentation.   Lecture, 3 credits; optional 1-credit laboratory, PSYC 230L. Lab fee; Lab offered periodically.

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    PSYC 231 - (E) Behavioral Neuroscience

    3-4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit or BIOL 141 -BIOL 142 )

    Introduction to the field of neuroscience, examining the cellular bases of behavior, effects of drugs and behavior, brain/body correlates of motivation and emotion, and neural changes accompanying pathology.  Three hours lecture and optional 1.5-credit laboratory, PSYC 231L.  Lab fee; Lab offered Fall only.  (Credit cannot be earned for both NEUR 231  and PSYC 231.)

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    PSYC 232 - Psychology of Language

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    An introduction to the scientific study of the psychological processes underlying the ability to produce and understand language.  Topics include how humans learn language, how humans comprehend language, how humans speak, bilingualism, the relationship between language and thought, and language in non-human species.

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    PSYC 233 - (S) Evolutionary Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    An introduction to the field of evolutionary psychology: the scientific study of human nature dedicated to discovering and understanding the mental adaptations that evolved to solve ancestral survival and reproductive problems. Topics discussed include eating, habitat selection, marriage, casual sex, parenting, kinship, cooperation, aggression, warfare, and conflict between the sexes.

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    PSYC 234 - (S) Cognitive Psychology

    3-4 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Considers a number of approaches to the study of human cognitive processes with an emphasis on the information processing model. Topics include pattern recognition, attention, memory, imagery, concepts and categories, and problem solving.  Lecture, 3 credits; optional 1-credit laboratory, PSYC 234L. (Lab fee; Lab offered periodically.)

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    PSYC 235 - Learning and Behavior

    3-4 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Concerns the experimental study of both classical and instrumental conditioning. Optional lab involves supervised animal and human experimentation.  Lecture, 3 credits; optional 1-credit laboratory, PSYC 235L. (Lab fee; Lab offered periodically.)

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    PSYC 236 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    The psychological study of people at work. Topics include personnel selection and training, motivation, leadership, the physical work environment, and computer applications. 

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    PSYC 237 - (D,S) Psychology of Women

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Examines the biological, sociological and cultural influences on the psychology of women. Topics include gender socialization, sex roles, and the impact of gender on personality, communication, achievement, and mental health. Offered periodically.

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    PSYC 238 - Exercise and Sport Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Covers principles of motivation, goal setting, reinforcement, emotional regulation, attention control, imagery, and positive thinking and the psychological benefits of exercise and exercise adherence. Areas of application in sport include preparation for competition, group and team dynamics, leadership, aggression in sport, and character development and sportsmanship.

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    PSYC 239 - Environmental and Conservation Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 110 , AP or Transfer Credit)

    Provides an overview of psychological theories and methods used to study the human-nature relationship and the specific approaches used to address modern environmental problems. This is a service learning course. Students will spend a minimum of 25 hours applying course concepts/tools to assist local environmental agencies. 

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    PSYC 310 - Multivariate Statistics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Grade of B or higher in PSYC 210  or equivalent course)

    Introduction to commonly used multivariate statistical methods including partial correlation, multiple regression, and factor analysis. Emphasis on analysis of actual data sets with SPSS, comparing alternative solution methods and their interpretation.  Not regularly scheduled.

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    PSYC 325 - Abnormal Child Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , PSYC 225 )

    This course considers atypical social, emotional, and mental development during childhood and adolescence.  Topics include intellectual disability, giftedness, learning disorders, psychopathology of childhood and adolescence, and conduct disorders.  Offered Spring only. 

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    PSYC 330 - Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; grade of C or higher in PSYC 210 )

    A survey of scientific methods and research designs in the behavioral sciences. Topics include single subject, survey, correlational and experimental research, and computerized data analysis. Not open to Psychology majors.

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    PSYC 334 - Couple and Family Therapy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , PSYC 225 )

    An introduction to the theory, research, and practice of couple-counseling and family therapy.  Topics include family dysfunctions, assessment methods, treatment approaches, innovative techniques, and research findings.  Not regularly scheduled.  (Credit cannot not be earned for both HD 334  and PSYC 334.)

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    PSYC 335 - Psychological Testing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; grade of C or higher in PSYC 210  or PSYC 211 )

    Provides a thorough grounding in principles of testing and a review of the major types of assessment, including intellectual, personality and interest. 

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    PSYC 339 - Psychopharmacology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; grade of C or higher in PSYC 231 )

    This course surveys the field of psychopharmacology with particular attention being paid to functional neuoranatomy, the important role of behavioral science, and the neuropharmacology of normal/ abnormal behaviors.  Numerous research strategies are examined, including dose-response functions, therapeutic indices, routes of administration, and pharmacological/behavioral models of clinical conditions.  Offered alternating years.  (Credit cannot be earned for both NEUR 339  and PSYC 339.)

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    PSYC 350 - Cognitive Neuroscience

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PSYC 210 ; PSYC 231/NEUR 231  or PSYC 234 )

    This course explores the neural underpinnings of human cognition by introducing research on the relationship between mind and brain.  The course introduces and expands on neuroanatomy, research methods used to make inferences about brain bases of cognition (e.g., imaging, electronencephalography, lesion studies), and computational approaches to cognitive neuroscience.  Discussions and activities focus on the brain bases of cognitive operations in perception, attention, memory, language, executive control, social cognition, reasoning, and decision making.

    (Credits cannot be earned for both PSYC 350 and NEUR 350 .)

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    PSYC 360 - (EPW) Clinical Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; Grade of C or higher in PSYC 225 )

    An overview of contemporary clinical psychology focusing on its practices, contributions and directions.  Topics include clinical research, psychological assessment, psychotherapy systems, community applications, and emerging specialties, such as health and forensic psychology. Fall only.

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    PSYC 361 - Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; grade of C or higher in PSYC 225 )

    Examines treatments of psychologist Albert Ellis and psychiatrist Aaron Beck. Ellis’ approach is rational emotive behavior therapy, and Beck has used the term cognitive therapy, or the more general “cognitive behavior therapy.”  This course provides an overview of theory, empirical support and future directions. Not regularly scheduled.

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    PSYC 362 - Child Clinical Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , PSYC 225 )

    Surveys approaches to psychotherapy with preschool through early adolescent children with common emotional, behavioral, and developmental problems.  Theory, assessment, formulation, and therapeutic techniques are addressed, and evidence-based approaches are highlighted.

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    PSYC 363 - Behavior Modification

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110  and PSYC 235 )

    Examines applications of social-learning principles in clinical, educational, and other applied settings. Topics include behavioral assessment, operant principles, self-management, response maintenance and ethical-legal issues raised by behavior modification. Students may be required to complete a self-management project during the course.  Not regularly scheduled.

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    PSYC 364 - (D) Psychology of Diversity

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , and one of the following: PSYC 220 , PSYC 226 , PSYC 227 , PSYC 224 , PSYC 225 , PSYC 233 , PSYC 236 , or PSYC 237 , or SOC 220  or SOC 224 .)

    Examines how individuals’ thoughts, feelings, and behavior are intertwined with their diverse cultural environments.  Includes the psychological processes that lead to social injustices, the effects of discrimination on individual well-being, and strategies for reducing prejudice and promoting diversity.  Emphasis will be on race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status but other dimensions of diversity (e.g., age, weight) will also be considered. Offered alternate years.

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    PSYC 365 - Positive Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 ; a grade of C or higher in PSYC 225 )

    Provides an introduction to positive psychology, the scientific study of how individuals thrive and communities flourish. This course focuses on explaining, predicting, and improving subjective well-being. As part of the course, students will participate in experiential activities designed to enhance their strengths, virtues, and positivity.

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    PSYC 390 - Career Development in Psychology

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisites: junior standing; Psychology major) 

    This seminar entails studying, discussing, and applying information on academic planning, career development, and graduate school.  Fall only.

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    PSYC 480 - Field Experience in Clinical Settings

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Psychology major; junior or senior standing with priority given to seniors; grade of C or higher in both PSYC 225  and PSYC 360 ; permission of instructor: PSYC 335  strongly recommended)

    This course entails supervised field experience in a mental-health or social-service facility in the community.  Students are required to spend 8 hours a week at their placement site and 1.5 hours a week in a seminar throughout the semester.  The professor provides classroom instruction, and the on-site supervisor provides clinical supervision. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

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    PSYC 481 - Field Experience in Applied Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Psychology major; junior or senior standing with priority given to seniors; a grade of B or higher in the psychology course that the faculty mentor deems most relevant to the field experience; permission of instructor)

    This course involves 100 hours of field experience in community settings that apply psychology, including cognitive, developmental, environmental, gerontological, language, quantitative, organizational, personel, and social psychology. Student will meet 6 times in a group seminar and an additional 5 times individually with a faculty mentor. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Spring semester only.

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    PSYC 490 - History and Literature of Psychology I

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: senior standing; Psychology major or minor) 

    This lecture and discussion course will examine the history of modern psychology from pre-Socratic philosophers to contemporary perspectives.  Emphasis will be placed on the influential works of the schools of thought that have shaped the emergence of psychology. Fall only.

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    PSYC 491 - (EPW) History and Literature of Psychology II

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: senior standing; grade of C or higher in PSYC 490 )

    This seminar, designed for students with a major or minor in Psychology, will entail critical reading, analysis, and discussion of selections from the seminal literature in psychology, including selected works of William James, Sigmund Freud, and B.F. Skinner.  Individual professors will choose additional readings on the basis of their interests and student preferences. Spring only.

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    PSYC 492 - Advanced Topics Seminar

    1-2 cr.
    Seminar course featuring advanced topics in psychology.  Restricted to junior and senior psychology majors by permission of the instructor.  The specific topic, scheduling format, and course prerequisites will vary by seminar.  The topics, with specific prerequisites, will be listed each semester and can be obtained for the academic year from the department chairperson. Not regularly scheduled.
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    PSYC 493 - Undergraduate Research

    1-3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: junior or senior standing; grade of B or higher in PSYC 330  lecture and the Psychology course most relevant to research topics; permission of instructor)

    Individual study and research on a specific topic under the supervision of a faculty member.  May be taken for 1 to 3 credits per course.  Students are expected to spend a minimum of 3 to 4 hours a week per credit on research activities throughout the semester.

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    PSYC 494 - (EPW) Undergraduate Research

    1-3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: junior or senior standing; a grade of B or higher in PSYC 330  lecture and the Psychology course most relevant to research topics; permission of instructor)

    Individual study and research on a specific topic under the supervision of a faculty member.  May be taken for 1 to 3 credits per course.  Students are expected to spend a minimum of 3 to 4 hours a week per credit on research activities throughout the semester.