Oct 23, 2019  
Graduate Studies Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Graduate Studies Catalog 2019-2020

Academic Regulations


 

Office of the Registrar and Academic Services

The Office of the Registrar and Academic Services supports the educational mission of the University by connecting students to the faculty, curriculum and classroom via the course scheduling and registration processes. As the custodian of the University’s academic records, the office ensures the accuracy, integrity, and security of those records. Furthermore, as members of the University community, the office promotes equity and fairness by supporting the development and consistent application of effective policies and processes.

The Office of the Registrar and Academic Services strives to meet the diverse service needs of students, faculty, administrative staff, alumni, and the public. The Office serves current and former students on a daily basis by answering questions, issuing transcripts, certifying enrollment status, providing degree credentials and distributing schedules. Additionally, the office promulgates the master schedule of courses for each academic year, conducts registration, processes grades, certifies degree eligibility and manages several aspects of commencement.

Course registration for returning students is conducted in April for the subsequent summer and fall, and in November for the subsequent spring and intersession through the University’s my.scranton.edu intranet portal. Self-Service in the my.scranton.edu portal also provides secure links to unofficial academic transcripts, registration options, student class schedules, address information, tuition accounts and financial aid information. Midterm and final grades are also available in Self-Service through my.scranton.edu .

Located in O’Hara Hall, the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services is open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information, call (570) 941-7721 or e-mail registrar@scranton.edu. Additional information and resources (including the academic calendar, course schedules, registration information and student grade point average calculator) are available online at www.scranton.edu/registrar.

General Regulations

All entering students are held to the degree requirements listed in the catalog of the year in which they enter.

The University reserves the right to change any of the policies, rules, and regulations in this catalog. All such changes are effective at such times as the proper authorities determine and may apply not only to prospective students but also to those who are already matriculated in the University. Curricular changes, however, shall not become effective until published in the catalog unless specifically approved for an earlier implementation date by the appropriate entity.  If a change is approved for implementation prior to its publication in a catalog, the appropriate school, academic department, or program shall inform all students affected by the change. Students can appeal issues related to the application of policies, rules, and requirements, including changes thereto, to the dean of their college.

The University reserves the right to take appropriate disciplinary action in the case of any student who conducts himself or herself in a manner that is contrary to the standards of the University. These standards (particularly in the area of academic integrity) are given clear expression in the University’s Academic Code of Honesty published in the faculty and student handbooks of the University. The University also reserves the right to modify admissions requirements, to change tuition and fee charges, and to change the schedule of courses.

Enrollment Status and Attendance Policy

To be considered a full-time student, graduate students must be registered for at least 6 credits in any given term or semester, regardless of the number of credits remaining to complete degree requirements.

Students are expected to attend all scheduled meetings of the courses in which they are enrolled. Students are responsible for all material presented and announcements made during any class. Attendance policies for individual courses are determined by the instructor and must be promulgated in writing in the course syllabus.

Policy and Procedure for Distance and/or Online Student Verification of Identity

The University of Scranton complies with the Middle States Commission of Higher Education (MSCHE) and United States Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) regulations regarding policies and procedures to ensure student identity verification in distance education.

Identity Management

Upon admission, each University of Scranton student is assigned a unique Royal Identification number (R number), username and password to log into the University’s portal. At initial login, the student is responsible for providing his/her complete and true identity information in the identification verification process and prompted to set up unique credentials for the purpose of creating a secure login. Students are encouraged to use the guidelines set forth by the University’s Strong Passwords Guidelines when creating a password.

Students utilize their secure log in information and unique password to access the Learning Management Systems (LMS) and other content contained in the University of Scranton portal. Furthermore, students may register for courses, view grades, view their account and link to online courses through the portal. As technology and personal accountability are not absolute in determining a student’s identity, faculty members are encouraged to use these technologies and to design courses that use assignments and evaluations that support academic integrity.   

In the event that a student enrolling in an online course or program is required to engage in an educational experience in person, faculty are encouraged to verify their identity via a photographic ID.  

Information Security

It is the student’s responsibility for maintaining the security of user names, passwords, and any other access credentials assigned to them. This information may not be shared or given to anyone other than the person to whom they were assigned. Students are responsible for any use and activity of their account. Attempting to discover another user’s password or attempts to gain unauthorized access to another person’s files or email is prohibited. Students are also responsible for knowing and abiding by the information contained within the Student Handbook, the Academic Code of Honesty, as well as the Information Technology Policies. Failure to read University guidelines, requirements and regulations will not exempt users from responsibility. Students are responsible for providing accurate and true information about themselves in any identity verification process.

All sensitive data, including FERPA-governed and enrollment related records, are presented to students via encrypted transport methods, predominantly HTTPS. Access to such information requires valid credentials, in addition to authorization controls within the portal and LMS.

Costs

The University does not currently charge students to verify their identity, however, if a charge for student identification verification is implemented, students would be notified in writing at the time of registration.

Privacy

The University of Scranton is committed to maintaining the highest standards in ethics and compliance. Departments abide by the University Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, which guides practices to protect the privacy and confidentiality of students. Personally identifiable information is collected by the University and may be used as the basis for identity verification at its discretion. For example, a student may be asked to provide unique information that could be compared to data in the University’s records, such as date of birth, phone number, street address, student Royal Identification number or other bio-demographic information, when requesting to have his/her password reset.

The University of Scranton recognizes the privacy rights of individuals who are or who have been students, as guaranteed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. No information from records, files, or data directly related to a student shall be disclosed to individuals or agencies outside the University without the express written consent of the student unless otherwise permitted or required by law. The Student Rights and Confidentiality of Information policy details student’s rights and University disclosure practices.
 
Policy Contact: The Office of the Registrar and Academic Services at 570-941-7721, or via email registrar@scranton.edu.  
For questions regarding the technical procedures described in this document, or for technical support, contact the Division of Information Technology at 570-941-4357 or techsupport@scranton.edu.

Statement on the Expected Student Use of The University of Scranton E-mail Account

All electronic communication from the University is directed exclusively to the University’s electronic mailbox. Students are expected to access their University e-mail account on a weekly basis; however, daily access is recommended to stay abreast of important, time-sensitive information. University departments and faculty routinely will use email to communicate important campus, academic program and course information.

Information on how to access the network and e-mail is regularly distributed to new students by the Information Resources Department. For more information on how to access your University of Scranton e-mail account or if you encounter problems accessing your e-mail, contact the Technology Support Center at (570) 941-4357 or techsupport@scranton.edu.

Degree Requirements

All students beginning the first term of their degree/certificate program at The University of Scranton in the 2019-2020 academic year shall be governed by curricular policies stated in this catalog. A degree represents the successful completion of the entire curriculum, including all requirements.   Students are solely responsible for the selection of courses and for the knowledge and completion of all degree requirements appropriate to their program of study.

Mentors

Each new graduate student will be assigned a mentor to formulate a program of study and to supervise her/his academic and professional progress. It is suggested that students work closely with their mentors and that the courtesy of arranging appointments in advance with faculty members so designated be observed by all students.

Course Numbering System

Courses appearing in this catalog are numbered according to the system described below. The first digit of any course number indicates the level of the course; the second and third digits specify categories of courses. Levels at which courses are offered include the following:

500 and above Graduate courses

 

Categories in which courses are offered are indicated according to the following system:

__00 – __79

Courses available for general education, majors, minors, concentrations and cognate.

Refer to course descriptions and specific program requirements for details.

__80 – __81 Practicum, Internship or Co-op courses
__82 – __83 Independent study
__84 Special topics
__85 – __89 Honors courses
__90 – __92 Seminars
__93 – __94 Research
__95 – __96 Travel courses
__98 – __99 Thesis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labs are indicated by an (L) following the number of the corresponding lecture courses.

 

Grading System

The following grades are used in graduate course work:

Grade Quality Points Per Credit Definition
A 4.00 Superior/outstanding
A- 3.67 Excellent
B+ 3.33 Very good
B 3.00 Good
B- 2.67 Fair
C+ 2.33 Passing grade
C 2.00 Minimal passing grade
F 0.00 Failure
AU 0.00 Audit
S Not computed Satisfactory or Pass
U Not computed Unsatisfactory or Fail

S/U grading is authorized only for certain courses.

“W” indicates that a student has withdrawn from a course.

“NG” is a temporary grade issued when a faculty member fails to meet the deadline for the submission of grade reports. Such temporary grades will be changed to permanent grade symbols when issued by the professor.

Special permission is not needed to repeat failed courses; however, prior approval of the dean of the program is needed to repeat non-failed courses. The recording of grades for repeated courses shall be governed by the following conditions:

1. Credit for a course will be granted only once;

2. Credit for the course will be lost if the course is repeated and failed;

3. The most recent credit and grade will count toward the GPA with this exception: a “W” grade cannot replace another grade;

4. Each attempt to complete a course will be reported on the student’s transcript;

5. Ordinarily, a student may repeat a course only in the same mode in which it was originally taken;

6. A student repeating a course must so indicate on his/her registration form.

Regular attendance at class is considered a requisite for successful completion of a course.

Incomplete Grade (I)

A grade of “I-Incomplete” is a temporary grade which may be assigned at the instructor’s discretion when illness, necessary absence, or other reasons beyond a student’s control prevent completion of course requirements by the published last day of class. This grade may be awarded to a student when, in the estimation of the instructor,

(1) the student has a legitimate reason to request an Incomplete grade;

(2) the student attended the course and has successfully completed at least 60% of the required course work;1

(3) the student has a reasonable likelihood of completing the remaining course requirements. In all cases, the Incomplete grade is a privilege exercised by an instructor. It is not a right ascribed to a student.

The student is responsible for developing a work plan which itemizes outstanding coursework and expected completion date(s). The work plan must be submitted to the instructor before the published last day of class. The instructor is responsible for delineating the conditions and terms for the completion of the course. A student assigned a grade of Incomplete is required to complete outstanding course requirements by the deadline(s) established for him/her by the instructor. The final deadline for completion of all course requirements may not exceed the mid-point of the subsequent semester, which for students enrolled in a regular term is the mid-point of the subsequent regular fall, intersession, spring or summer term and for students enrolled in special terms is the mid-point of the subsequent 8-week part of the special term (i.e. incomplete work from an “A” term is due by the mid-point of the subsequent “B” term). [See chart below and academic calendar for specific dates.] 

  Term   Incomplete Grade Deadline
  Regular Fall and Intersession   Mid-point Regular Spring
  Special Fall A   Mid-point Special Fall B
  Special Fall B   Mid-point Special Spring A
  Regular Spring   Mid-point Regular Summer2
  Special Spring A   Mid-point Special Spring B
  Special Spring B   Mid-point Special Summer A
  Regular Summer   Mid-point Regular Fall
  Special Summer A   Mid-point Special Summer B
  Special Summer B   Mid-point Special Fall A

An Incomplete grade cannot be assigned as a substitute for non-attendance or a low or failing grade. Credits for a course in which an Incomplete grade has been issued are not considered earned for purposes of determining academic standing, academic honors, federal financial aid eligibility, athletic eligibility, or other purposes.

The student may not register for alternate coursework in future terms for the purpose of completing outstanding course requirements or re-enroll in the course for which the grade of Incomplete has been awarded. Work submitted before or at the deadline will be assessed by the course instructor, and the grade of “I” will be changed to the earned grade for the course. Failure to complete the necessary work within the stipulated time results in automatic conversion of the temporary “I - Incomplete” grade to a permanent grade of “F - Failure.” The grade of F is considered final and will be reflected in the student’s GPA and Satisfactory Academic Progress calculations.

Requests for an extension of a deadline for completion of an Incomplete grade must be made by the original Incomplete grade deadline and are subject to the approval of the instructor and the dean (or his/her designee). Only in the most extenuating circumstances will extensions be granted. To make a request for an extension of a deadline for completion of an Incomplete grade, a student must complete a Petition to Extend an Incomplete Grade Form, which includes a justification for the request, a work plan that itemizes outstanding coursework with expected completion date(s) and relevant supporting documentation. The form must be submitted to the student’s instructor and the dean of his/her respective college. If approved, an extension of the Incomplete grade deadline may not exceed one additional regular or special academic term.

1Pursuant the Higher Education Act, a school is required to monitor student enrollment to determine the earned and unearned portions of Title IV aid in the event a student ceases to attend. Title IV aid must be returned if a student completes less than 60% of the requirements within a payment period. A school’s grading policy must differentiate between students who complete the course but fail to achieve the course objectives and those students who do not complete the course. HEA, Section 484B. 34 CFR 666.8.22. DCL GEN-11-14, July 2011.

2 The initial incomplete deadline by which a student must complete Regular Spring course requirements may be extended from the mid-point of the Regular Summer term to the first week of the Regular Fall term with permission of the instructor and the dean.

In-Progress Grade (IP)

A grade of “In-progress (IP)” is a temporary grade which may be assigned by an instructor in specially designated courses that are longitudinal in nature. By design, the requirements of these courses exceed the length of one term. Examples of courses meeting this requirement include residencies, fieldwork, internships, practicums, theses and select honors and/or research courses.

Students assigned a grade of IP are assumed to be making satisfactory progress towards the completion of course requirements at a pace deemed acceptable to the instructor. Students assigned a grade of IP are required to complete course requirements by the deadline(s) established for him/her by the instructor. The final deadline for completion of all course requirements for which an IP grade has been assigned may not exceed one calendar year from the original start date of the course.

Credits for a course in which an IP grade has been issued are not considered earned for purposes of determining academic standing, academic honors, federal financial aid eligibility, athletic eligibility, or other purposes. Failure to complete the necessary work within the stipulated time results in automatic conversion of the temporary “IP – In-progress” grade to a permanent grade of “F - Failure.” The grade of F is considered final and will be reflected in the student’s GPA and Satisfactory Academic Progress calculations.

Audit (AU)

Entry of the audit grade (AU) on a transcript assumes satisfactory attendance. The student should consult with the instructor as to what constitutes satisfactory attendance. A change to audit can be made only by passing students and before the end of the first half of a semester.

Repeat of Course

Special permission is not needed to repeat a course at The University of Scranton. Recording of grades for repeated courses shall be governed by the following conditions:

(1) credit for a course will be granted only once;

(2) credit for the course will be lost if the course is repeated and failed;

(3) the most recent credit and grade will count toward the grade point average with the exceptions that a W, I, IP, AU or NG grade cannot replace another grade;

(4) each attempt to complete a course will be reflected on the student’s transcript even though the credits of the earlier attempts do not count in the cumulative grade point average. For example, a course with a grade of F will continue to appear on the transcript even after the course has been repeated with a passing grade, although the credits from the initial failed attempt will not be used in the calculation of the cumulative GPA).

The earlier course attempt or attempts (with the exception of W, I, IP, AU or NG) will be denoted on the transcript by an “E – Excluded.” “E – Excluded” means that the course has been excluded from the earned hours and GPA calculations. The latest attempt (with the exception of W, I, IP, AU or NG) will be denoted on the transcript by an “I-Included.” “I-Included” means that the course has been included in the earned hours and GPA calculations.

Final Grades

Final grades are determined by faculty for all registered students at the completion of each term and semester according to the grading scheme defined above. Final grades must be submitted through the official grading system as designated by the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services. Final grades are recorded on each student’s official, academic transcript. Final grades are available to each student after the grade submission deadline published in the academic calendar. Students may access their grades through the my.scranton portal under the Self-Service section. Students may also grant and rescind third-party access to others through their Self-Service accounts.

Appeal of a Graduate Course Grade

A student who wishes to appeal the final grade in a graduate course should first contact the instructor of the course in order to remedy the situation informally. If, having met with the instructor, the student still thinks that he/she has been inappropriately evaluated in the course, he/she may make a written request that the chairperson of the faculty member’s department review the process by which the grade was determined. The written request must describe, in detail, the situation and reason for appealing the course grade. The chairperson will attempt to facilitate a reasonable solution at the departmental level. The chairperson may make written recommendation to both the student and faculty member following the review. If the matter is not resolved at the departmental level, then the student may request, in writing, that the dean of the program review the matter. The dean will conduct a review and provide a written decision to the student and faculty member. The dean’s decision is final. Ordinarily, no grade appeal will be considered unless it has been received by the dean’s office within thirty calendar days of the time the original grade was available to the student. 

Change of Grade

A student who believes the grade received for a course is inaccurate should first appeal the matter to the professor, whose decision is normally final. The student has the right, however, to appeal to the faculty member’s chairperson, who will make a recommendation in writing to his or her dean. The student may request the dean to review the matter. The decision of the dean is final. Ordinarily, no grade change will be considered unless it has been reviewed by the dean’s office within one month from the time the original grade was available to the student.

Grade Point Average

A standard used in judging a student’s performance is the grade point average (GPA). The value of each semester hour of credit earned is determined as follows: a grade of A is valued at 4 quality points; A- at 3.67 quality points; B+ at 3.33; B at 3.00; B- at 2.67; C+ at 2.33; C at 2.00; C- at 1.67. An F yields no quality points. Thus, for example, a 3-credit course with a grade of A yields 12 quality points; a B yields 9; a C yields 6.

The GPA is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total of grade point average credit hours. For example, 15 GPA credit hours, all at C grade, would earn 30 Quality Points or a 2.00 GPA (30/15).

The total number of grade point average credit hours includes those courses with final grades of F as well as A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+. C, and C-. The grade designations of AU, CD, CR, CS, I, IP, NC, NG, S, W, TC and U do not count toward the GPA. This grade point average applies only to courses taken at The University of Scranton. Grades from other institutions are not computed into students’ grade point average with the exception of those earned at Marywood University through The University of Scranton/Marywood University cross-registration agreement.

A grade point average listing is made at the end of each semester.

 Waiver or Partial Waiver of Regulations

A graduate student seeking waiver or partial waiver of a graduate requirement must petition in writing his/her Graduate Program Director explaining what relief is sought and why the student believes special consideration is justified. The Graduate Program Director will review the petition and will send her/his recommendation to the dean of the program. The dean will review the petition and inform the student of his/her decision. In all cases, the decision of the dean is final.

Standards of Progress

All graduate students must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.00 in order to graduate with a master’s or doctoral degree. In addition, all graduate students must maintain a cumulative graduate GPA of at least 3.00 in order to remain in good standing.

A graduate student whose cumulative graduate GPA falls between a 3.00 and 2.00 will be placed on academic probation. A graduate student whose cumulative graduate GPA falls below a 2.00 will be subject to dismissal.

Academic Probation

If a graduate student is placed on academic probation, the student is required to earn a cumulative graduate GPA of a least 3.00 within the next three courses taken (normally nine hours of course work).

Successful achievement of this expectation will result in the master’s, DNP, or DBA student being reinstated to regular academic status.

Failure to fulfill this expectation may result in the dismissal of the master’s, DNP, or DBA student.

Although there are no set limitations on the number of courses a master’s, DNP, or DBA student may take in a semester while on academic probation, it is imperative that the student recognizes the necessity of improved academic performance in order to regain the minimum graduate GPA of 3.00 within the next three courses.

A student on academic probation cannot apply for a graduate assistantship. A student who is a graduate assistant and who is placed on academic probation may be reappointed for a second year provided he/she is making reasonable progress toward completion of degree requirements. In this situation, the student’s graduate program director will need to provide the Dean with a written recommendation presenting a sufficient case for reappointment.

Time Limit

All graduate work for a degree, including the thesis, must be completed within six-years of the date when the first graduate level course is taken. Time spent in the armed forces is not included in the six-year period. Extension of this time restriction may be granted for valid reasons at the discretion of the dean of the program.

Graduation Procedures and Commencement

The University of Scranton provides the opportunity for students who have completed degree requirements to graduate at one of four points throughout the academic year: summer graduation (graduation date: August 31), fall graduation (graduation date: December 31), intersession graduation (graduation date: January 31), or spring graduation (graduation date coincides with the annual Commencement exercise). Commencement exercises are held once each academic year at the conclusion of the spring semester; the date is published in the official University academic calendar. Students who are certified to graduate in the summer, fall, intersession or spring may participate in Commencement.

Certification of graduation, receipt of a degree, and permission to participate in Commencement are not automatic. Students expecting to complete degree requirements for a spring graduation must make formal application online through their Self Service account in the University portal, my.scranton.edu by January 31st. Students who are expecting to complete degree requirements for an August graduation date must apply by July 10th; students who are expecting to complete degree requirements for a December or January graduation date must apply by November 10th. More information can be found on the Commencement webpage at www.scranton.edu/commencement.

Application for Degree

In order to qualify for award of the master’s or doctoral degree, a student must complete the Application for Degree form. This should be done prior to the Course Registration period for the term in which the student expects to finish all requirements. Online Applications for Degree can be found at http://www.scranton.edu/academics/registrar/graduate/commencement-information.shtml

The University provides the opportunity for students who have completed degree requirements to graduate at the conclusion of each academic term: summer, fall, intersession, spring. Official dates of graduation are noted in the academic calendar. Commencement exercises are held once in the academic year, at the conclusion of the spring term. Students who graduated in the previous summer, fall or intersession terms, as well as in the current spring term, may participate in these commencement exercises.

Students expecting to complete degree requirements for a spring graduation must make formal application online through their Self-Service account in the University portal, my.scranton.edu by January 31st. Students who are expecting to complete degree requirements for an August graduation date must apply by June 30th; students who are expecting to complete degree requirements for a December or January graduation date must apply by October 31st. More information can be found on the Commencement webpage at www.scranton.edu/commencement.

Walker Policy

Graduate students who are within six (6) academic credits of fulfilling all graduation requirements and are in good academic and disciplinary standing may request to “walk” at the spring Commencement ceremony. A student seeking to participate in May Commencement must present a plan that outlines his/her remaining degree requirements to his/her dean by January 31st. Outstanding coursework must be completed at The University of Scranton during the summer and/or fall semesters following the commencement ceremony. The dean reserves the right to approve or deny the student’s request. Participation in Commencement does not signify receipt of degree. Degree conferral (graduation) occurs after submission of an Application for Degree form and upon successful completion of all degree requirements. If approved to walk, the student may not participate in a second commencement ceremony upon completion of all degree requirements.

Transfer of Credits

Transfer of credits to graduate programs at The University of Scranton is governed by the following policies (special exceptions may pertain to affiliation programs):

Credits for transfer must be earned at an accredited institution while enrolled as a graduate student;

A maximum of nine graduate credits may be transferred for graduate programs requiring at least 39 credit hours for completion and six graduate credits may be transferred for graduate [degree] programs that require less than 39 credit hours for completion;

Courses to be transferred must be integral to the student’s program of study;

Transferred credits must have been taken within six years of the date of requested transfer to The University of Scranton;

A grade of B or better is required in any course to be transferred and an official transcript demonstrating this must be submitted for work at other institutions (including course descriptions of the credits in question). A grade of Pass or Satisfactory is not acceptable for transferred credits;

The course to be transferred must be a regularly scheduled course and not a workshop.

Please note: Any course work taught in a language other than English, will require a transcript evaluation.

Students matriculated at The University of Scranton may take courses at other accredited graduate schools for the purpose of transfer of credit only with the prior permission of their mentor and the dean of their college.

Field Experiences and Internships

Many community agencies and organizations may require students completing course required hours, or volunteers completing elective hours to obtain clearances, vaccinations and/or health insurance prior to working with individuals within the organization. Students in certain disciplines may be required to apply and pay for clearances, vaccinations, and/or health insurance in regard to their respective majors in order to complete certain assignments within a course. It can take several weeks to receive clearance results. Please check with your department or field coordinator for details to see which requirements are needed for your major, and how often they need to be renewed. 

Capstone Experience

Each student in a master’s degree program must complete a capstone experience in his/her field of study. For some programs, this will mean successfully passing a comprehensive examination given during the last semester of studies; some programs  will require the writing and defense of a master’s thesis or major research paper, directed by the student’s academic advisor, on a topic appropriate to the field of study; and other programs may require the writing and defense of a major paper, written in the program’s capstone course, which synthesizes the ideas, philosophy, and techniques learned in the program of study. Students failing the capstone experience twice are subject to dismissal.

Following are graduate requirements concerning the comprehensive examination and thesis.

Comprehensive Examination

Students who are required to take a comprehensive examination must apply to take the examination by the deadlines given in the academic calendar, using the Application for Comprehensive Examination form available for on campus students at https://forms.scranton.edu/comprehensive-examination-on-campus-form/ and for online students at http://forms.scranton.edu/comprehensive-examination-form/. The examinations may be oral, written or both and are given on dates published in the academic calendar in this catalog. The director of the student’s program determines eligibility for the examination. Students should consult their mentor regarding the nature of the examination in their field. Please refer to the relevant program-of-study section in this catalog for capstone experience requirements. Students failing the capstone experience twice are subject to dismissal.

Thesis

The Weinberg Memorial Library coordinates the submission of graduate theses. For thesis submission instructions, visit www.scranton.edu/library/theses and select “Current Graduate Students”. Students failing the capstone experience twice are subject to dismissal.

Dropping, Withdrawing from or Adding a Course

Students may add courses anytime between the initial registration period and the published last day to add classes. Students who wish to drop one or more courses by the drop deadline, but who plan to continue attendance in at least one other course during the term, must secure their dean’s permission. A dropped course is not reflected on a student’s transcript. Specific dates are published in the official University academic calendar. A refund schedule for dropped courses applies to students paying on a per-credit basis or completely withdrawing from the University; the refund schedule dates are published in the official University academic calendar.

Note: There is a special fee assessed for any course-related schedule change made after the official add/drop period.

Withdrawal from a Course

After the period to drop a course concludes, students may withdraw from a course until the published withdrawal deadline.  A “W” grade is recorded on the transcript and appropriate tuition/fees are assessed. In all cases, students should first discuss the matter with the course instructor and/or mentor.

Students who wish to withdraw from one or more courses, but who plan to continue to attend at least one course for the term, must have a Schedule Change Form signed by their instructor and dean. Students who wish to withdraw from their last course(s) must submit the Complete Withdrawal/Leave of Absence Form. In either case, the forms are available online, through the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services and the academic department chairpersons’ offices. The completed forms must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services by the withdrawal deadline as indicated in the University academic calendar. Failure to officially withdraw from a course will result in a grade of F (failing grade).

Courses Taken as Readers and Independent Studies

The purpose of reader and independent study courses is to enable University of Scranton students in good academic and disciplinary standing to pursue a course of study that meets one of the following descriptions.

Readers are study experiences that replicate courses listed in the catalog and are offered to one or, less frequently, two students. These offerings are limited to meeting acute student programmatic need, as identified and accepted by the dean, and are not meant to be offered routinely.

Independent Studies experiences provided to academically successful students, are specially designed learning experiences and are not offered in the normal course listing.

Thesis experiences are specially designed and are not offered in the normal course listing. These experiences are based on experimental work that involves intensive research activity and a public defense on the part of the student.

Students may take no more than one reader or independent study per term and no more than one reader or independent study per year, on average, during the course of their degree programs. Readers and independent studies are to be taken for the same number of credits as are granted similar courses in the discipline in which the reader or independent study is offered. Readers and independent studies may not ordinarily be used to repeat failed courses.

The completed Reader and Independent Study forms should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services by the last day to add courses as published in the University academic calendar. A fee of $60 per credit in addition to the normal tuition will be charged.

Readers and independent studies are not available to visiting students. Faculty conducting independent study courses will provide the dean’s office with a copy of the syllabus, reading lists, and examinations used in the independent study. Normally, faculty are limited to mentoring no more than two students per semester in any combination of readers, independent studies, directed studies and special topics. Exceptions to this limitation can be made by the dean of the program for programmatic reasons or in response to course cancellations.

 Repeat of a Course

Special permission is not needed to repeat a course at The University of Scranton. Recording of grades for repeated courses shall be governed by the following conditions:

(1) credit for a course will be granted only once;

(2) credit for the course will be lost if the course is repeated and failed;

(3) the most recent credit and grade will count toward the grade point average with the exceptions that a W, I, IP, AU or NG grade cannot replace another grade;

(4) each attempt to complete a course will be reflected on the student’s transcript even though the credits of the earlier attempts do not count in the cumulative grade point average. For example, a course with a grade of F will continue to appear on the transcript even after the course has been repeated with a passing grade, although the credits from the initial failed attempt will not be used in the calculation of the cumulative GPA). The earlier course attempt or attempts (with the exception of W, I, IP, AU or NG) will be denoted on the transcript by an “E – Excluded.” “E – Excluded” means that the course has been excluded from the earned hours and GPA calculations. The latest attempt (with the exception of W, I, IP, AU or NG) will be denoted on the transcript by an “I-Included.” “I-Included” means that the course has been included in the earned hours and GPA calculations.

Credit Hour Policy

The University of Scranton complies with Federal (US DOE) and Middle States Commission of Higher Education (MSCHE) regulations regarding degree and credit hour requirements. The University of Scranton undergraduate degrees require the satisfactory completion of at least 120 semester credit hours, of which at least 63 credit hours satisfy, but are not exclusive to, fulfillment of general education requirements. Associates degrees require at least 60 semester credit hours. All master’s degrees require at least 30 semester credit hours beyond the baccalaureate level. The number of credit hours for a degree beyond a master’s degree is determined by the faculty and reflects the recommendation of professional associations or national learned societies.

The University’s academic calendar includes an academic year divided into two semesters (fall and spring). Each is approximately 15 weeks in length. Accelerated sessions, such as Intersession and Summer, are variable in length and comply with the established University credit policy. In addition to the nonstandard, accelerated terms of intersession and regular summer, the University has three 16-week “special” terms each academic year for some graduate programs.  Each of these special terms is comprised of one full 16-week session, two 8-week sessions and four 4-week sessions designated as “parts-of-term” in the enterprise database. The special term calendar launches using the same start date as the standard fall semester. 

The University of Scranton defines a credit hour pursuant to federal guidelines. A credit hour is “an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for a semester or trimester hour, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or

2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities such as laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, or other academic work leading to the award of credit hours” (34 CFR 600.2 as cited in FSA BB, Jan 2013, Vol. 3, p. 3-4; and DCL GEN-11-06).

The University also complies with the established curricular credit regulations of the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE): 22 Pa. Code Chapter 31, 31.21-31.22. One semester credit is defined as 14 hours of classroom instruction, exclusive of registration, final examinations and holidays. 

Credit Hour Standard by Instructional Method

The University of Scranton measures credit hours using the Carnegie unit; a credit hour is expected to be a reasonable approximation of a minimum amount of student work in accordance with the Carnegie unit. PDE’s curricular credit policy allows for determining activities that are the equivalent of classroom instruction. Definitions of The University of Scranton’s instructional methods appear below.  For purposes of the definitions below, 50 Carnegie minutes equals 1 hour.  

Lecture: courses with multiple students that meet to engage in various forms of group instruction under the direct supervision of a University faculty member. One lecture, seminar, or discussion credit hour represents 1 hour per week of scheduled class/seminar time and a minimum of 2 hours of student preparation time. Lecture courses are typically offered in accordance with the University’s standard block schedule.

 

Lecture Hours per Credit

Credit Awarded

Minimum Contact Time

Per Week (excluding final exams)

Minimum Contact Time

Per Week in Carnegie Hour Minutes (excluding final exams)

Total Instruction Time

for a Standard Semester [1] (excluding final exams)

Minimum Total Instruction Time for a Standard Semester in Carnegie Hour Minutes

(including final exams)

1 1 hour 50 minutes 14 hours 820 minutes [i.e.,700 minutes of teaching + 120 minutes of final exams]
2 2 hours 100 minutes 28 hours 1520 minutes [i.e., 1400 minutes of teaching + 120 minutes of final exams]
3 3 hours 150 minutes 42 hours 2220 minutes [i.e., 2100 minutes of teaching + 120 minutes of final exams]
4 4 hours 200 minutes 56 hours

2920 minutes [i.e., 2800 minutes of teaching + 120 minutes of final exams]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Standard semester at The University of Scranton is 14 weeks of direct teaching plus 2 literal hours (120 minutes) of final exams. The University considers the “one hour of direct faculty instruction” within the Carnegie unit to be 50 minutes, rather than a literal 60 minutes per hour.

Laboratory and Studio: courses with a focus on experimental learning under the direct supervision of a University faculty member wherein the student performs substantive work in a laboratory or studio setting. One laboratory credit hour represents 1-2 hours per week of scheduled supervised laboratory work and a minimum of 2 hours of student preparation time.

Practicum: a practicum provides students with the opportunity to practice and enhance skills that they have acquired in previous coursework. Practicum coursework may include a mix of didactic, group supervision and clinical hours. One practicum hour is equivalent to approximately 3 or more hours of work per week for 14 weeks.

Education Practica: Student Teaching Practicum: supervised student teaching representing 3 lecture hours and at least 30 classroom hours each week for 14 weeks.

Internships, Clinical/Field experience, Residencies, Externships: courses developed for independent learning or experience involving directed and/or self-directed and often off-site learning. The content and learning outcomes are determined by the supervising faculty and the work supervisor at the cooperating site, both of whom must judge and certify different aspects of student’s work and completion of agreed upon outcomes and assessment of those outcomes. The University requires a minimum of 14 hours of work for each credit hour earned in these types of experiences.

Accelerated Courses: courses offered in terms of length less than a traditional semester. These courses offer the same semester credit hours as traditional semester-length classes. Within the shortened time-frame, accelerated courses must meet the minimum contact hour requirements of the lecture format and the expectations of student preparation time equal that of a lecture course.

Experiential Learning: credit for experiential learning may be granted to individuals who submit evidence of learning equivalent to University level course objectives/learning outcomes. Considered evidence may include portfolios, summaries of learning experiences, letters from supervisors, CLEP, Excelsior College Examination, ACE-approved credit, portfolio credit, and PONSI credit and/or other materials that clearly illustrate achievement of each course learning outcome. Credit for experiential learning must be comparable in scope, content, academic rigor and student study time as courses offered in a lecture format.

Independent Study: courses of study in which a University faculty member regularly interacts and directs student outcomes with periodic contact. Students must illustrate achievement of the independent study course objectives/learning outcomes in order to receive credit. The student must interact with the faculty member on a regular and substantive basis to assure progress within the course. Semester hour credit awarded must be comparable in scope, content, academic rigor and student study time as courses offered in a lecture format.

Hybrid: Hybrid courses are a combination of face-to-face and online distance learning methods. Contact time is satisfied through face-to-face instruction as well as other methods, such as, but not limited to: a) regular online instruction or interaction with a faculty member once a week for each week the course runs; b) academic engagement through interactive tutorials, group discussions moderated by faculty, virtual study/group projects, engaging with class peers, journals, web-links, discussion board exchanges, chat room activities, blogs, on-line quizzes/exams, video conference, email correspondence, conference calls, etc. c.) computer tutorials graded and reviewed by faculty. Minimum student preparation time expectations equal that of a lecture course.

Online (web-based):  courses offered entirely online without regard to face-to-face meetings. These courses have comparable learning outcomes and substantive components of a standard lecture course with alternate delivery methods. Minimum student preparation time expectations equal that of a lecture course. The University follows the definition of Distance Education/Distance Learning consistent with HEOA, PDE and Middle States standards and guidelines for all distance learning degree or certificate programs. Contact time is satisfied through several means which can include, but is not limited to, the following: a) regular online instruction or interaction with a faculty member once a week for each week the course runs; b) academic engagement through interactive tutorials, group discussions moderated by faculty, virtual study/group projects, engaging with class peers, journals, web-links, discussion board exchanges, chat room activities, blogs, on-line quizzes/exams, video conference, email correspondence, conference calls, etc. c.) computer tutorials graded and reviewed by faculty. 

Practices to Determine Amount and Level of Credit

The faculty is responsible for the curriculum. Credit values for courses are determined at the department level based upon faculty expertise, instructional method and course objectives. Upon departmental approval, the course undergoes additional evaluation as it moves through the course approval process. Faculty on the Curriculum Committees and the Faculty Senate review each new course and ensure that credit hours are in compliance before voting for approval of these new courses. The Office of the Provost reviews all new courses in order to ensure compliance with credit hours and course learning outcomes before awarding final approval of courses. Changes in curriculum are noted in the University Catalog (updated each July/August) and on the website.   

Approved courses are sent to the Registrar’s Office for inclusion in Schedule of Classes. The Office of the Registrar regularly audits scheduled course offerings to ensure compliance with credit hour requirements through its process for scheduling each semester. Discrepancies are brought to the attention of the appropriate department for correction.

Interruptions in Attendance: Leave of Absence and Complete Withdrawal

Leave of Absence

Students may request their dean’s approval for a leave of absence by completing and submitting the Complete Withdrawal/Leave of Absence Form available in the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services, academic advising centers, and academic department chairperson offices. Graduation requirements in effect for a student at the time of his/her approved leave begins will remain in effect when a student returns from his/her leave under the following conditions:

  • The student is in good academic and disciplinary standing at The University when their leave begins;
  • The student may not take courses at another institution without first securing written approval from their dean;
  • The student’s leave is limited to one semester but may be renewed for one additional semester with the written permission of their dean;
  • The student must report their address and phone number to the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services and promptly report a change of address/phone number to that office;
  • The student understands that this policy does not bind The University to offer their curricula or major programs, which may have been discontinued or substantially altered during their leave of absence;
  • A student who interrupts their education without an approved leave of absence must apply for readmission and will be subject to the catalog requirements in effect at the time of readmission;
  • A student on an approved leave of absence must apply for readmission, however, the student will retain the same catalog requirements in effect at matriculation as long as their leave does not extend beyond a year.

Military Leave Policy

If a student is called or volunteers for active military duty while attending The University of Scranton, the University will do its best to protect the academic and financial interest of the student within the norms of good academic judgment. The student must meet with the dean of his/her college and provide proof of being called to active duty. The dean, after conferring with the Director of Financial Aid, the Treasurer, the student’s current faculty, and the student, will decide the course of action. The dean will then process the necessary paperwork and place the student on military leave status. If the student does not concur with the dean’s decision, the student may appeal to the Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. The student is responsible for all room and board and related expenses incurred. Deans must confer with the Financial Aid and Treasurer’s Offices before making decisions regarding refunds.

Complete Withdrawal from the University

Students wishing to drop or withdraw from all of their courses, thereby discontinuing their enrollment, must secure their dean’s permission to withdraw from The University. Students should also discuss any questions with their advisor or department chairperson. The form for withdrawal may be obtained in the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services, the academic advising centers, or academic department chairpersons’ offices. University withdrawal is not official until all signatures required on the Complete Withdrawal/Leave of Absence Form have been obtained and the form is submitted to the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services.

Any tuition refund will be determined by the official date of University withdrawal. No grades for the term will be recorded on the student’s academic record if the official University withdrawal date is on or before the last day for 25% tuition refund or the last day to drop courses according to the official University academic calendar. Grades of “W” will be recorded for course work if the official University withdrawal date coincides with the course withdrawal period. Final grades will be recorded for course work if the official withdrawal date is after the course withdrawal period for the term.

Readmission to the University

A student on an approved leave of absence must apply for readmission, however, the student will retain the same catalog requirements in effect at matriculation as long as their leave does not extend beyond a year.

University policy prohibits students dismissed from another institution or a college of the University from registering for courses in any of the colleges of the University in the semester following dismissal. An undergraduate student who has been dismissed from The University of Scranton and wishes to apply for readmission to the University may do so no sooner than one full semester after the semester in which the dismissal took place. Readmission is not automatic; the student will need to demonstrate that the conditions which led to the dismissal will not present a continuing problem. Readmission is not permitted if a student is dismissed a second time from the University. 

All students must apply for readmission to the University through the college in which the intended program of study is housed. The dean of that college (i.e., the readmitting dean) will confer with the student’s dean of last attendance at the University, if different from the readmitting dean. When determining eligibility for readmission, the dean may review the student’s academic transcript and record. The dean may also confer with Student Formation about any disciplinary or mental health issues that might preclude readmission, and if the student was on medical leave, may also require documentation from the health-care provider that the student may now resume their studies.

If the student is requesting readmission into a program other than the one of her/his last attendance, the readmitting dean will confer with the department chair or director of the program to which the student is requesting readmission regarding program-specific admission requirements. If the student attended another college or university subsequent to her/his last attendance at the University, the student must submit an official transcript from that institution to the readmitting dean before that dean will render a final decision on readmission.

The dean will render a final readmission decision and inform the student and Office of the Registrar and Academic Services. If the dean renders a decision to readmit the student, that official transcript will then be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services for analysis/determination of transfer credit acceptable toward the intended program of study. Pre-permission to take courses elsewhere is valid only if the student continues in the same program, and if there have been no significant curricular changes mandated by relevant certification bodies in the interim that would affect the transfer credit. Transfer courses would need to be reevaluated upon readmission if the student changes programs.

Academic Renewal Policy upon Readmission

Students who have not attended the University for at least five calendar years may request academic renewal. At the time of readmission, students seeking academic renewal must complete an academic renewal form and may petition their dean to have up to 16 credit hours of deficient grades removed from their grade point averages (GPA). The deficient courses and their grades will remain on the transcript, however, they be excluded from the earned hours and GPA calculations and will not count toward graduation requirements. The courses with excluded grades on the transcript will be designated with an E, and the transcript key will explain that E means the course grade has been excluded from the GPA and earned hour calculations, yielding an amended GPA. A comment also will be added to the transcript indicating that the student received academic renewal and the date.

Student Course Evaluations

Because student course evaluations are a necessary part of the University’s program to enhance the quality of teaching, students are asked to complete an evaluation for each of their courses. Final grades are unavailable for one week in those cases where students choose not to complete the evaluations.

Policy Changes, Academic Integrity, Student Conduct and Student Rights of Confidentiality

Policy Changes

The University reserves the right to change any of the rules and regulations in this catalog. All such changes are effective at such times as the proper authorities determine and may apply not only to prospective students but also to those who are already matriculated in the University. However, curricular changes shall not become effective until published in the catalog unless specifically approved for an earlier implementation date by the appropriate body. If a change is approved for implementation prior to its publication in a catalog, the appropriate school, department, or program shall inform students affected by the change. Application of policies, rules, and requirements, including changes thereto, may be appealed to the dean of the student’s college.

Academic Integrity: Academic Code of Honesty

Students have responsibility for governing their own conduct in compliance with the Academic Code of Honesty, which addresses behavioral integrity in the academic work of the University. Conduct that violates the Code includes plagiarism, duplicate submission of the same work, collusion, providing false information, unauthorized use of computers, theft and destruction of property, and unauthorized possession of tests and other materials. Steps taken in response to suspected violations may include a discussion with the instructor, an informal meeting with the dean of the college and a hearing before the Academic Dishonesty Hearing Board. Students who are found to have violated the Code will ordinarily be assigned the grade F by the instructor and may face other sanctions. The complete Academic Code of Honesty is available in the deans’ offices, in the Student Handbook and on the web at.www.scranton.edu/studenthandbook.

Professional Standards of Conduct

Students in many of the programs offered by the Panuska College of Professional Studies (PCPS) also are bound by standards of conduct established by their chosen profession (check with your program director, program catalog and program handbook for program-specific standards). Violation of these behavioral codes or standards may delay or prevent placement of a student in fieldwork required for degree completion. Further, many programs in PCPS require criminal background and child abuse clearances. A criminal history may preclude placement of a student in fieldwork required for degree completion, which would ultimately prevent a student from completing their degree program. A student’s ability to obtain a state license or certification may be affected also. It is the student’s responsibility, prior to selecting a PCPS program of study, to familiarize themselves with the standards of their chosen profession and, once selected, to adhere to the behavioral standards established by the University and their profession. Students should immediately inform their program director of any past or current behavioral issue, including background clearances, to understand how it may affect progress toward degree completion or licensure.

Student Conduct

The University reserves the right to take appropriate disciplinary action in the case of any student who conducts himself or herself contrary to the standards of the University. These standards (particularly the “Academic Code of Honesty” and the “Policies Governing the University Community”, (www.scranton.edu/studenthandbook) are given clear expression in the faculty and student handbooks of the University. The University also reserves the right to modify admissions requirements, the right to change tuition and fee charges, and the right to change the semester schedule of courses.

Student Rights of Confidentiality

The University of Scranton recognizes the privacy rights of individuals who are or who have been students, as guaranteed by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. No information from educational records, files, or other data directly related to a student shall be disclosed to individuals or agencies outside The University without the express written consent of the student. Except where prescribed by law, information regarding a student’s education record may not be disclosed to a parent, guardian or spouse without the student’s written authorization on file in the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services, academic advising center or dean’s office, or unless the student has granted access to specific information to specific persons through the online Third Party Authorization Form in their Self-Service account in the www.scranton.edu portal.

FERPA does authorize the University to disclose information without consent to school officials with legitimate educational interests. Legitimate education interest means that the official has a need to know in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities on behalf of the University. Examples of people having legitimate education interest depending on their official duties and within the context of those duties include: persons or companies with whom The University has contracted, such as attorneys, auditors, collection agents, consultants and other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional functions or services; students serving on official committees, such as disciplinary or grievance committees or assisting school officials in performing their tasks; persons or organizations to whom students have applied for financial aid; persons in compliance with a lawful subpoena or court order; and persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety of students or other persons. In January 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expanded the circumstances of release to federal, state and local authorities to evaluate federal- or state- supported education programs, to researchers performing certain types of studies, and to state authorities in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems. In addition, the complete “Student Rights and Confidentiality of Information Policy” can be reviewed at the following link: http://www.scranton.edu/studenthandbook.

The University considers the following to be public information that may be made available, at its discretion, without prior consent of the student:

Name

Former name(s)

Address (local and permanent)

Telephone number (campus/local and permanent)

Date and place of birth

Photograph

Major field of study

Participation in officially recognized activities and sports

E-mail address

Dates of attendance

Enrollment status

Campus employment

Class level

Expected/actual date of graduation

Degrees, awards, academic honors

Weight and height of members of athletic teams

Students who wish to prevent the public disclosure of any or all the above information may complete and submit a request to the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services.

A directory of names, addresses and telephone numbers of students is promulgated by The University at the beginning of the fall semester. Students who do not wish to be listed in the campus directory must notify the University by the end of the first week of classes in the fall semester.

FERPA affords students the right to inspect and review their educational records within 45 days of the day The University receives such requests. Students should submit to the Registrar or other appropriate official written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. University officials will make arrangements for access and notify requesting students of the time and place where their records may be inspected.

Students have the right to request the amendment of any educational records that they believe are inaccurate or misleading. They should write to the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record that they want changed, and specify why they believe it is inaccurate or misleading. If The University decides not to amend the records as requested, The University will notify students of the decision and advise them of their right to appeal the decision and the process that must be undertaken to do so.

For more information regarding FERPA, please contact the Office of the Registrar and Academic Services, Room 106, O’Hara Hall. Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by The University of Scranton to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20202-5920.In addition, The University of Scranton complies with the Student Right-to-Know Act by providing graduation rate information to current and prospective students upon request. Graduation rate information may be obtained by contacting the Institutional Research Office or by consulting the University’s Consumer Information webpage at http://www.scranton.edu/pir/institutional-research/HEOA/index.shtml.

Special Note for Students

It is the personal responsibility of each student to acquire an active knowledge of all pertinent regulations set forth in the Graduate Studies Catalog.