Jan 26, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    HIST 331 - (CH) Recent U.S. History: 1960 to the Present

    3 cr.
    A study of American society since 1960. The course will focus on the New Frontier and Great Society; the Vietnam War; protest movements; Watergate; and the conservative response to these developments.
  
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    HIST 333 - Twentieth-Century Europe to 1945

    3 cr.
    World War I; Treaty of Versailles; Russia becomes the USSR; social and cultural developments; the European struggle for security; Italian Fascism; rise of Nazi Germany; World War II.
  
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    HIST 334 - Twentieth-Century Europe After 1945

    3 cr.
    Loss of colonial empires in Africa and Asia; development of the Cold War; Marshall Plan and NATO; Post-war prosperity; cultural and social developments; the Fall of Communism.
  
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    HIST 335 - World War II, Cold War and Détente

    3 cr.
    The diplomacy of World War II; the development of the Cold War between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. and the adoption of the policy of detente.
  
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    HIST 336 - History of American Law

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HIST 110 -HIST 111 )

    Traces the history of ideas and concepts utilized by the courts, legislature, organized bar and administrative agencies to solve legal problems: and shows how American legal thought and reasoning developed from Colonial days to the present.

  
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    HIST 337 - English Constitutional and Legal History

    3 cr.
    Anglo-Saxon basis; Norman political institutions; Magna Carta; beginnings of common law; jury system; Tudor absolutism; struggle for sovereignty; rise of House of Commons; democratic reforms; extension of administrative law.
  
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    HIST 338 - American Foreign Relations 1776 - 1900

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HIST 110 )

    A study of American diplomatic history and principles, including an examination of the American Revolution, the Early American Republic, The War of 1812, The Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, The Civil War, and the Spanish-American War.

  
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    HIST 339 - 20th Century American Foreign Relations

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HIST 111 )

    A study of American diplomatic history and principles including an examination of the Spanish American War, Latin American diplomacy in the 20th century, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War.

  
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    HIST 340 - History of Urban America

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HIST 110 -HIST 111 )

    The evolution of cities in the United States from the founding of colonial settlements to the end of the 20th century.  The nature of cities and urban life, the process and impact of urban growth, and the problems facing contemporary cities will all be considered.

  
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    HIST 341 - Central Europe 1848 - 1989

    3 cr.


    This course will examine the history of four nations of Central Europe: the Austrians, Hungarians, Czechs, and the Poles, between the revolutionary years of 1848 and 1989.  We will examine the history of each nation during this period.

    (Offered alternate years)

  
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    HIST 350 - (CH) American Environmental History

    3 cr.
    Assuming a basic knowledge of U.S. History, the goal of this course is to expose students to the dialogue between humanity and nature in which cultural and environmental systems powerfully interact, shaping and influencing each other, without either side wholly determining the outcome.  Topics that will be examined include Native American Ecology, the impact of European Colonization, the rise of the Market Economy, Westward Expansion, the rise of Twentieth-Century Industry, and the emergence of Ecology, and Globalization.
  
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    HIST 379 - The United States and China: From the Eighteenth Century to the Present

    3 cr.


    An upper-level course to examine US-China relations from their first encounter in the eighteenth century to the present, the underlying dynamics, patterns and trends, and perceptions and/or misconceptions in the relationship.  In addition to traditional focus on diplomatic, political, military, and economic relations, the course will explore other equally important but neglected aspects such as cultural, social, and psychological interactions as well as individuals who shaped the contours of the bilateral relationship.

    (Offered alternate years)

  
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    HIST 382 - Guided Independent Study

    1.5 cr.
    Designed for academically successful students. Working under the direction of a faculty member, the student will explore a topic in history through a planned program of reading, research and writing.
  
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    HIST 383 - Guided Independent Study

    1.5 cr.
    Designed for academically successful students. Working under the direction of a faculty member, the student will explore a topic in history through a planned program of reading, research and writing.
  
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    HIST 390 - History Internship

    3-6 cr.
    A practical work experience which exposes the student to the nature of historical investigation, analysis, and/or writing in a museum, historical site, or public agency. Supervision by faculty and agencies.
  
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    HIST 395 - Modern Germany History and Culture

    3 cr.
    This international travel course to Germany will take place primarily in its capital of Berlin, although we will visit Munich.  We will explore the history, culture and politics of a country and a city at the center of modern Europe.  The course will last two weeks and will consist of a series of class lectures, cultural activities community engagements, and visits to historic sites.
  
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    HIST 490 - (EPW) Seminar in History

    3 cr.


    (Restricted to senior History majors or students with a Latin-American Studies concentration.) 

    An analysis of selected topics in history. Extensive readings. Historical research and writing stressed.

  
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    HONR 187H - Honors Ideamaking Experience

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program) 

    The class serves as an introduction to the Honors Program and also models the research process more broadly.  The course begins in the final days of intersession, giving students a retreat-like experience, and continues in the early days of the spring semester.  It traces the nature of research across academic disciplines.

  
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    HONR 287H - (CL,P) Honors Keystone

    3 cr.


     (Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program)

    This team taught course, a requirement of the Honors program, puts students into conversation across or between academic disciplines around a particular topic, subject to change each time the course is offered.  The course should satisfy up to two varying G.E. area requirements every semester.  May be repeated for credit.

  
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    HONR 387H - Honors in Context Seminar

    1 cr.
    Student-led discussions of contemporary non-fictional works chosen for their variety and their importance.
  
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    HONR 487H - Honors Capstone Seminar

    1 cr.


    (Formerly 489H) 

    Student-led discussions of the content, rationale, and methodology of Senior Honors Projects.

  
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    HRS 111 - (S) Macro Human Resources

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the changing nature of work including trends, theories, concepts, and practices for maintaining an effective workforce.
  
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    HRS 112 - Micro Human Resources

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the major functional areas of the human resources field.
  
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    HRS 251 - (EPW) Performance Appraisal

    3 cr.
    A review of the performance management process including the design and implementation of job descriptions and of accompanying performance appraisal systems. Includes community based learning component.
  
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    HRS 252 - (EPW) Workforce Education and Training

    3 cr.
    A study of the various organizational approaches to developing the skills and competencies of employees including the assessment of need, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of training. Includes community based learning component.
  
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    HRS 284 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Selected topics in human resources are offered on a variable basis.
  
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    HRS 293 - Research Applications in Human Resources

    3 cr.
    An introduction to research methodology as applied to human resources issues and problems with an emphasis on experimental and quasi-experimental designs.
  
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    HRS 315 - Diversity

    3 cr.
    This course offers the student an opportunity for increased awareness regarding diverse cultures, effects of cultural diversity, the special needs of diverse cultures, workforce issues and multiculturalism. International management culture, strategy and behaviors are examined as well as diversity leadership and globalization.
  
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    HRS 331 - Globalization and Human Resource Management

    3 cr.
    This course examines international human resource management (HRM), global integration, expatriation, global competition, transnational enterprises, conceptual models, comparative management, international strategies, HRM issues and problems, HRM processes and functions in international businesses, cross-cultural management, communication and culture, leadership across cultures, and motivating across cultures.
  
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    HRS 340 - Compensation and Benefits

    3 cr.
    A study of both direct and indirect forms of compensation including legal requirements with a focus on internal and external equity.
  
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    HRS 351 - (D) Recruitment, Selection, and Staffing

    3 cr.
    Study of the techniques, methods, and requirements for identifying, screening, evaluating, and selecting prospective job candidates. Includes community based learning component.
  
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    HRS 353 - Human Resources Information Systems

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the various computer software applications related to the human resources field.
  
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    HRS 354 - Employee and Labor Relations

    3 cr.
    A study of the process of analyzing, developing, implementing and evaluating the workplace relationship between employer and employee (including labor unions) to maintain and retain an effective, productive workforce.
  
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    HRS 382 - Directed Study

    3 cr.
    An independent study experience on a specific human resources–related topic or a research project.
  
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    HRS 390 - Human Resources Career Seminar

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisite: HRS major or minor) 

    A survey of current trends and occupations in Human Resources with an emphasis on advanced planning and preparation for the required internship experience and post-graduation career planning.

  
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    HRS 441 - People Skills and Strategies

    3 cr.
    An in-depth study of leadership skills and strategies needed to deal most effectively with human behavior in organizations.
  
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    HRS 480 - Human Resources Internship

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HRS major or minor; HRS 390 )

    A supervised human resources work experience within an approved organizational setting.  Requires at least 120 hours of human resources employment with an additional 18 hours of on-campus, faculty-led seminars and individual meetings.

  
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    HRS 490 - Human Resources Leadership Seminar

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HRS major or minor; HRS 390  and HRS 480 )

    Students will assess and develop their leadership skills and participate in an in-depth case study that integrates previous learning. Includes community based learning component.

  
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    HUM 286H - (C,W) Victorian Studies

    3 cr.
    This course uses literature to explore 19th-century British social and intellectual history. Focusing on the period from 1832 to 1901, it examines Victorian attitudes toward industrialization, religion, art and gender.
  
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    HUM 296 - (CI) Dante’s Inferno and the Florence of His Times

    3 cr.
    This course in English examines selections from Dante’s Inferno, elements of medieval thought and imagery and Dante’s representation of Florence and its politics. Includes visits to architectural and artistic sites significant to Dante’s life and work. Fulfills requirements in the Italian Studies concentration but not the Italian minor or major.
  
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    IB 476 - U.S.-East Asia Trade and Investment

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ECO/IB 351 )

    This course describes and analyzes trade and investment flows between the U.S. and Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan. Topics covered in the course include: economic trends in these countries, U.S. trade and investment with them, U.S. trade deficit, trade policies of the U.S. and these countries, analysis of Japan’s Keiretsu, Korea’s Chaebol, China’s MFN status and Taiwan’s environmental problems.

  
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    IB 477 - European Business

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ECO/IB 351 )

    This course introduces the student to the European business environment, focusing on the implications for international business operations and competitiveness.  This includes the study of rapidly changing business environments throughout Europe, especially the nations of the European Union (EU).  The elimination of barriers to trade, and the response of companies inside and outside the EU to the threats and opportunities of both the Single Market and the Euro Zone are examined.

  
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    IB 478 - Business in China

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ECO/IB 351 )

    This course introduces the student to the dynamic business environment in the People’s Republic of China, focusing on the implications for international business operations and competitiveness.

  
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    IB 495 - European Business Experience

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: MGT 351 , MKT 351 , ECO/IB 351 )

    Students will have an opportunity to participate in lecture-discussion sessions with top-level executives from various multinational corporations, local business firms and government agencies in a number of different countries in Europe.  Participants will gain a basic understanding of the issues prominent in international business today.  Course involves travel to Europe.  (Credits cannot be earned for IB 495 and MGT 495  and MKT 495 .)

  
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    INTD 103 - (D) The Vietnam Experience

    3 cr.
    The historical origins of the Vietnam War, including the period of French colonialism and the American intervention; the politics, economics, and military strategy in Vietnam during the war years and today; present relations with China and the USSR. Why were we there and why did we fail?
  
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    INTD 104 - (D,E) Men’s Health

    3 cr.
    The course will examine the historic, physiologic, social, cultural, emotional and economic issues affecting men’s health. The course explores strategies to assist students to gain information regarding men’s health issues, adopt healthier lifestyles, and use health care services appropriately. Health issues related to culture and diversity will also be addressed. Class members will be expected to actively participate in all discussions.
  
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    INTD 105 - Great Lives: Images on Stage

    3 cr.
    An examination of the often contrasting impressions of historical personalities, as they are portrayed in plays and films and as they appear to historians. Historical figures to be considered include Caesar, Richard III, Thomas More, Lincoln and Churchill.
  
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    INTD 108 - Health and Legal Implications of Chemical/Drug Abuse

    3 cr.
    A team-taught course that deals with the neurophysical, health, and legal implications of alcohol/drug abuse, via: its biochemical effects and aspects, its legal and social consequences, and its health and lifestyle implications.
  
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    INTD 109 - (CA, Q) Mathematics and the Visual Arts

    3 cr.
    A study of mathematical topics related to art, architecture, and design through the ages. Topics include: musical ratios, golden ratio, polygons, tilings, symmetry, circles, spirals, Platonic solids, perspective, and fractals. Visual artists include: Vitruvius, Palladio, Le Corbusier, Villard de Honnecourt, Leonardo, Dürer, Escher, and Greek, Islamic, and Indian designers.
  
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    INTD 110J - The Jesuit Magis

    3 cr.
    For nearly 500 years, the Society of Jesus has been committed to pursuing the magis, a restless desire for excellence grounded in gratitude.  Among other things, this course will explore the foundation of this concept in the life of Ignatius of Loyola and his spirituality.  We will consider what role the magis has played in the span of Jesuit history, with particular focus on its implications for Jesuit education.  Finally, we will ask what it means to be women and men of the magis – the shared call of each member of this University community, especially students in SJLA.
  
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    INTD 112 - (FYO, FYD) EP Foundation

    3 cr.
    This course is designed to foster knowledge and abilities needed for gathering, evaluating and disseminating information.  Students will gain insight and understanding of digital technology and learn to make effective, responsible and prudent use of it.  Students will make effective use of oral communication as a way to disseminate thoughts and information in conversation, discussion, and the public sphere.
  
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    INTD 117 - Writing, Research and Speaking

    6 cr.
    Students will make the transition from high school to college-level writing, research & speaking through a series of workshops, conferences, writing assignments & oral presentations. This course satisfies both the Oral Communication & the Written Communication requirements in the University’s General Education curriculum.
  
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    INTD 209 - (D) The Holocaust

    3 cr.
    An exploration of the cataclysmic event in Jewish history known as the Holocaust. The course will examine the subject from the perspective of various academic disciplines – historical, sociological, philosophical, artistic, and literary, among others – and will include a field trip to the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C.
  
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    INTD 210 - (P, E) Catholic Bioethics: Biotechnology and Human Dignity

    3 cr.
    The current scientific understanding of human fertilization and development, reproductive technologies, human cloning, stem cell research, gene and medically defined death will be reviewed. Pertinent ethical considerations will be discussed, presenting the Catholic perspective in dialogue with the major philosophical approaches.
  
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    INTD 211 - (D,E) HIV/AIDS: Biological, Social and Cultural Issues

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 102  or equivalent)

    Study of the biology of HIV and AIDS, impact of the epidemic on various social groups and countries.  The epidemiology of the disease and the response of health-care systems and governments.  Opportunity for American Red Cross certification in basic HIV facts and eligibility for HIV Instructor certification will be included as part of the course. Open to all majors.

  
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    INTD 239 - (E) Physics of Theatre

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the physics of lighting, sound and special effects in the context of theatrical production. Readings will explore both underlying physics and theatrical aesthetics. Assignments include applications in color, reflection and refraction of light, acoustics and aesthetics in sound, and an exploration of special effects such as stage fog.
  
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    INTD 250 - Integrating Your Immersion Experience

    1 cr.


    (Pre-requisite: To be eligible, students must have completed either a service trip of at least one full week, or relevant study abroad course or program within one year before the course begins.  The experience may have been domestic or international.)

    According to the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm, genuine education requires a process of reflection to follow experience before moving into action.  Such a process is particularly important for students who have had an immersion experience among the economically disadvantaged.  This course offers such students the opportunity to reflect on, process and analyze what they have experienced in a variety of ways. 

  
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    INTD 290 - Leadership and Civic Responsibility

    3 cr.
    This course, which follows the Presidential Colloquy and bridges students’ first and second years, nurtures their leadership skills and sense of civic responsibility. The course is designed to foster students’ sense of what they wish to accomplish during their undergraduate experience along with their understanding of the larger social implications of their studies, their community involvement and their lives. Students engage in interdisciplinary readings and discussions, real-time shared reflection on the meaning of their summer employment and civic engagement, and the mentoring of incoming freshmen.
  
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    INTD 314 - (D,W) Women Making History in Pennsylvania

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: WRTG 105 , WRTG 106 , WRTG 107  or equivalent)

    The seminar-style course focuses on women’s history in northeastern Pennsylvania, 1880-1945.  Students will identify, research and analyze primary documents to enrich the fund of knowledge on women’s history in the state.  Some travel is planned to historic sites in the region.  Topics engage disciplines from science to law to art.
  
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    INTD 333 - (CA,P,W) The Bible in Image and Text

    3 cr.
    This team-taught course is a study of the interpretation of major biblical stories and figures in the Christian theological tradition and in art history. The marriage of Christian text and image is a natural and long-lived one; it provides an exciting way to integrate knowledge of various major themes such as creation and last judgment, and of many great biblical figures, such as Moses and Christ.
  
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    IS 390 - (W) Seminar in International Studies

    3 cr.
    Required for International Studies majors. Other advanced undergraduates may take this course with permission of the professor. This course may be used for either History or Political Science credit.
  
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    IT 112 - (FYDT, FYOC) Introduction to Computing and Information Technology

    3 cr.
    This course presents foundational concepts and surveys the past, present and future of computing and information technology with an emphasis on the seminal ideas, concepts, inventions and innovations that fuel the Digital Revolution.  The sub-disciplines of computing are identified and discussed relative to each other.  This course is designed to foster knowledge and abilities needed for gathering, evaluating and disseminating information with an emphasis on digital technology and oral communication. (Credits may not be earned for both CMPS 112  and IT 112.)
  
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    IT 120 - Human-Computer Interaction

    3 cr.

    (Formerly CMPS 202)

    A course that covers fundamental aspects of web design and development.  Topics include design principles, coding HTML and cascading style sheets, JavaScript to create dynamic web pages, server-side vs. client-side technologies, and using a Content Management System that separates design from content while making it easy for non-technical users to update a web site. 

  
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    IT 210 - System Administration

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 134  and MATH 142 )

    Introduces students to system administration and maintenance as well as platform technologies.  Includes operating systems, applications, administrative activities and domains, computer architecture and organization, and computing infrastructure.

  
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    IT 241 - Fundamentals of Information Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 134  and MATH 142 )

    This course introduces students to databases and information management.  Topics include query languages, database organization and architecture, data modeling, managing the database environment, and special-purpose databases.

  
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    IT 244 - Integrative Programming

    3 cr.


    (Co-requisites: CMPS 144  and IT 210 )

    The application of information technologies presents many situations where systems and applications, that were not initially designed to work together, need to do so.  This course introduces students to commonly used representations, languages, interfaces, models and practices pertinent to such integrative situations.  Students will gain experience using and developing software to accomplish integration.  The course also presents an overview of programming languages, presenting both a conceptual foundation and a survey of relevant scripting languages.

  
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    IT 310 - System Integration & Architecture

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: IT 210  and IT 244 )

    Introduces students to the techniques, principles, and issues related to system integration and architecture.  Topics include requirements analysis, acquisition, sourcing, integration, project management, testing and quality assurance, organizational context, and architecture.

  
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    IT 354 - Computer Networks

    3 cr.


    (Formerly CMPS 311) (Prerequisite: CMPS 144 )

    An introduction to intranets and wide-area networking including operating systems fundamentals, hardware considerations, deployment and administration of networks, security issues, intrusion detection/protection, firewalls, VPN’s and encryption. 

  
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    IT 356 - Web Programming

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: IT 120  and IT 244 )

    This course covers all aspects of programming on the World Wide Web.  This includes the presentation of HTML, Java, JavaScript and CGI.  Topics include advanced HTML (maps, forms, etc.) client-server programming basics as they relate to the Web, Java machine concepts, Java/JavaScript similarities and differences, server-side programming, GIF animations, Web programming resources and environments. (Students may not earn credit for IT 356 and CMPS 356 .)

  
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    IT 358 - Information Assurance & Security

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: IT 241  and IT 356 )

    This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features.

  
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    IT 384 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Study of selected topics in Information Technology.  A syllabus including prerequisites is published prior to the registration period for the course.
  
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    IT 481 - Internship

    3-6 cr.


    (Formerly MIT 481)

    This is an extensive job experience in information technology that carries academic credit. Prior approval is required. Course can be taken more than once.

  
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    IT 490 - (EPW) Information Technology Project

    3 cr.


    (Formerly MIT 490) (Prerequisite: IT 310  and permission of the department.)

    In this course, students prepare and present Information Technology projects to be evaluated by the instructor and their fellow students.

  
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    ITAL 101-102 - (CF) Beginning Italian

    6 cr.
    (Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or consent of instructor is normally the prerequisite to ITAL 102)

    Introduction to the Italian language. Designed for beginners.  Taught in Italian. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
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    ITAL 195 - (D) Italian Culture through the Image

    3 cr.
    This travel course explores aspects of Italian culture through the visual experience of photography.  Students will familiarize themselves with the theories and techniques of famous Tuscan masters of photography and subsequently engage in photographic assignments aimed at capturing the complexity of Italian culture past and present. Taught by University faculty from the Department of World Languages in conjunction with faculty at the Istituto Europeo in Florence.
  
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    ITAL 211-212 - (CF,D) Intermediate Italian

    6 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ITAL 101-102  or equivalent and ITAL 211 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to ITAL 212)

    Completion of ITAL 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.  Grammatical review, written and oral composition with selected cultural readings of intermediate difficulty.  Taught in Italian. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    ITAL 295 - (CF,D) Intensive Italian Abroad

    3 cr.
    An intensive course of several hours daily at an institution in Italy.  Taught in Italian.
  
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    ITAL 311-312 - (CF,D,W) Advanced Italian Composition and Conversation

    6 cr.
    (Prerequisite: ITAL 211-212  or equivalent)

    Completion of ITAL 312 satisfies one semester of the writing-intensive requirements
    . An intensive course in Italian composition and conversation with emphasis on detailed study of advanced grammatical and stylistic usage of the Italian language. Taught in Italian. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
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    ITAL 313 - (CL) Survey of Italian Literature I

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: ITAL 311-312  or equivalent)

    This course, introduces students to 19th-and 20th-century Italian literature and to significant literary movements and figures from these periods. Taught in Italian.
  
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    ITAL 314 - (CL) Survey of Italian Literature II

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: ITAL 311-312  or equivalent)

    This course introduces students to Italian literature from the medieval period to the 18th century. It focuses on significant literary movements and figures from these periods. Taught in Italian.
  
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    ITAL 315 - (D) Italian Culture and Society

    3 cr.
    An examination of Italian culture and society from the Renaissance to today. The course traces the development of Italian culture and society through primary texts, including essays, plays, short stories, films, opera and contemporary music, and sculpture and painting.
  
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    ITAL 321 - Italian Short Story

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: ITAL 311-312 )

    This course will examine the Italian short story through a study of representative texts. Taught in Italian.
  
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    ITAL 322 - Italian Theatre

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: ITAL 311-312  or equivalent)

    This course will examine Italian theatre through a study of representative forms and texts. Taught in Italian.
  
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    ITAL 333 - Italian Practicum

    1 cr.
    (Prerequisite: Enrollment in a FLaC course, that is, a course listed as E and F, English language or Foreign language credit bearing.)

    A one-credit course in the target language to supplement FLaC courses (Foreign Language across the Curriculum) taught in English.  In addition to doing their reading and writing in the target language, students receiving credit in the target language will meet an additional hour per week for discussion in that language. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ITAL 413 - (CL,D,W) Topics in Italian Studies

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: ITAL 311-312  or equivalent)

    Studies of a specific author, period, movement, theme, and/or genre. Taught in Italian. Because topics may vary, the course may be repeated for credit with the consent of the Department chair.
  
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    ITAL 439 - (CL,D,W) The Craft of Translation

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: ITAL 311-312  or equivalent)

    In this course, students will undertake a series of translation and interpretation exercises and activities from Italian to English. Focus will be on the application of grammatical structures as well as on the interpretive qualities of transposing from one idiom to another. Taught in Italian.
  
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    JPN 101 - (CF) Beginning Japanese

    3 cr.
    Development of the fundamental skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing, with emphasis on language performance. Emphasis on practical application of the basic skills for business-related activities. Relevant cultural aspects are introduced. Designed primarily for students with no background in the Japanese language. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
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    JPN 102 - (CF) Beginning Japanese

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: JPN 101  is normally the prerequisite to 102)

    Development of the fundamental skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing, with emphasis on language performance. Emphasis on practical application of the basic skills for business-related activities. Relevant cultural aspects are introduced. Designed primarily for students with no background in the Japanese language.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
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    JPN 211 - (C,F,D) Intermediate Japanese

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: JPN 101 -JPN 102  or equivalent)

    This course continues development of the four major skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Upon completion of the course students will understand all the basic concepts of the structure of the language.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    JPN 212 - (C,F,D) Intermediate Japanese

    1.5 cr.
    (Prerequisites: JPN 101 -JPN 102  or equivalent; JPN 211  or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212)

    This course continues development of the four major skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Upon completion of the course students will understand all the basic concepts of the structure of the language. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
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    LA/WS 395 - (S,D) Women and Development in Latin America

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: At least one of the following: PS 219 ; SOC 220 ; HIST 125 , HIST 126  or HIST 213 ; PHIL 218 , PHIL 231 ; WOMN 215 /SOC 315  or have permission of the instructors.)

    This travel course takes students to visit one or more women’s economic cooperatives in Latin America. Through reading, reflection, and site visits, students will be challenged to understand the burdens placed on women in Latin America as well as the roles that women have played in that region’s development. 

  
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    LANG 493 - Senior Portfolio

    0 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Senior status)

    Seniors WLC majors will produce a portfolio in their senior year.  A compilation of materials that the student assembles carefully to document and discuss academic development and learning experiences in the major, the portfolio is an organizational tool and a vehicle for self-reflection of work done in the target language.

  
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    LAS 295 - (S,D) Mexican Culture and Language

    3 cr.
    An intersession travel course to Guadalajara, Mexico, for 3 credits in the social sciences (political science), and cultural diversity credit. The course is team-taught by University of Scranton faculty from the Departments of World Languages and Cultures, and Political Science with assistance from Mexican faculty at UNIVA. (Taken in conjunction with SPAN 295 .)  (Formerly PS 295)
  
  •  

    LAT 111 - (CF) Beginning Latin

    3 cr.
    An intensive course in the fundamentals of Latin reading and composition.
  
  •  

    LAT 112 - (CF) Beginning Latin

    3 cr.
    An intensive course in the fundamentals of Latin reading and composition.
  
  •  

    LAT 205 - History of Latin Literature

    3 cr.
    A survey of Roman and post-Roman Latin literature. Taught in English.
  
  •  

    LAT 211 - (CF) Intermediate Latin

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: LAT 111 -LAT 112  or equivalent)

    Review of fundamentals. Reading of selections from Caesar, Cicero and Virgil.
  
  •  

    LAT 212 - (CF) Intermediate Latin

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: LAT 111 -LAT 112  or equivalent)

    Review of fundamentals. Reading of selections from Caesar, Cicero and Virgil.
  
  •  

    LAT 213 - (CL,D,W) Classical Roman Literature and Mythology

    3 cr.
    The course examines the role that mythology played in Roman literature, and examines the changing attitudes of the Romans toward the divinities, manifested in literature from Plautus to Apuleius. All readings and lectures in English.
  
  •  

    LAT 220 - Ancient Civilization: Rome

    3 cr.
    The political, constitutional, and cultural history of Rome from the earliest times to the end of the Western empire. All readings and lectures in English.
 

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