May 20, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    EXSC 380 - Internship in Exercise Science

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: EXSC 375 , Exercise Science major)

    The application of Exercise Science principles, knowledge and skills in a supervised setting.  Depending on career interests, students can select from a variety of interest including sites located outside of the Northeast region.

  
  •  

    EXSC 412 - (W) Current Topics in Exercise Science and Sports Medicine

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: EXSC 210  or BIOL 347  or permission of instructor)

    Current topics in the field affecting health and human performance including ergogenics, exercise benefits in chronic, disease states, clinical exercise physiology, and age/gender issues.

  
  •  

    EXSC 435 - (D) Exercise, Nutrition and Women’s Health

    3 cr.
    This course is designed to address the major aspects of women’s health, including historical, epidemiological, clinical, exercise, nutrition, special populations, cultural and psychosocial issues. Includes service-learning component.
  
  •  

    EXSC 440 - Advanced Physiology of Sport and Exercise

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing in Exercise Science) 

    Advanced concepts of human performance as related to sport and exercise including physiological limits, Bioenergetics, fiber type/myoplasticity of skeletal muscle, cardiovascular dynamics and the athletic heart, and pulmonary ventilation and aerobic performance.

  
  •  

    EXSC 442 - Clinical Exercise Physiology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: EXSC 210  or BIOL 347  or permission of instructor)

    This course covers exercise response and adaptation in a variety of chronic lifestyle diseases and the use of exercise tolerance assessment to improve and optimize quality of life.  Includes service-learning component.

  
  •  

    EXSC 448 - Research Methods in Exercise Science

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing in Exercise Science, EXSC 375 )

    Designed for the student to study and gain experience in research related to the field of Exercise Science.  The nature of research, methods for acquiring, analyzing, and publishing/presenting research relevant to Exercise Science.

  
  •  

    FIN 251 - Introduction to Finance

    3 cr.


    (Formerly FIN 351) (Prerequisites: MATH 107  or permission from the instructor, ECO 153 , ECO 154 , Corequisites: ACC 251  or ACC 253 )

    This course introduces the business student to the field of finance.  It serves as the foundation course for financial principles used in both financial management and investment courses.  Topics include time value of money, risk analysis, basic operation of the capital markets, current asset and liability analysis, and introduction to the topics of capital budgeting and cost of capital calculation.

  
  •  

    FIN 362 - Investments

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: FIN 251 )

    An introduction to the theory and process of managing investments.  Topics include practical operation of the equity markets, debt options and futures markets.  Stock-valuation models using fundamental technical and random-walk approaches.

  
  •  

    FIN 363 - Intermediate Finance

    3 cr


    Prerequisites:STAT 252  or STAT 253 , ACC 251  and ACC 252 , and FIN 251 .

    Intermediate Finance builds on the introductory course in finance (FIN 251 ).  The topics covered will include, Financial Planning and Short-Term Financing, Risk and Capital Budgeting, Capital Structure and Dividend Policy, Long-Term Financing, Derivatives and Corporate Finance, and Mergers and Acquisitions.

  
  •  

    FIN 365 - Fixed Income Securities and Markets

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites:FIN 251  and FIN 362 )

    This course will cover fixed income products, analytical techniques for valuing bonds, and the quantification of bond exposure to various types of risk.  Topics discussed will include: the structure of the U.S. bond market, valuation, securitization, price and yield calculations, the measurement and management of risks associated with investing in fixed income securities and bond portfolio management.

  
  •  

    FIN 471 - Derivative Securities

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: FIN 362 )

    This course looks at the nature of derivative securities, focusing on options.  It develops pricing models for options, emphasizing the Black-Scholes model.  The use of options in various investment strategies is discussed in terms of risk and return.  Students use real-time data to implement these strategies.

  
  •  

    FIN 472 - Portfolio Management

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: FIN 362 )

    Advanced study of professional management of various portfolios including those of banks, insurance companies, pension funds, and non-profit institutions.  Markowitz and Sharpe models, data availability, and computerized-data services are covered.

  
  •  

    FIN 473 - Financial Institutions

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ECO 362 )

    The study of financial markets and financial institutions, including depository and nondepository institutions.  Topics include regulation, operation, and management of financial institutions, financial instruments, interest-rate principles, risk-management strategies, loan analysis, and asset/liability management.  Insurance and pension principles and investment banking are covered.

  
  •  

    FIN 476 - Case Course in Corporate Finance

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites FIN 363 , ACC 361 , and ACC 362 )

    The goal of this course is to familiarize you with fundamental aspects of corporate financial policy and practice through case analysis.  Both financing and investment decision making will be examined through in-depth case discussions of representative finance cases including data analysis as appropriate.  Tentative topics include capital budgeting under uncertainty, estimation of cost of equity/debt and weighted average cost of capital, implications of the capital asset pricing model and arbitrage pricing theory, dividend policy, optimal capital structure, initial public offerings and merger & acquisitions.
  
  •  

    FIN/IB 475 - International Finance

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ECO/IB 351 , FIN 251 )

    This course deals with the environment of international financial management, exchange-rate determination, foreign-exchange risk-management, multinational working-capital management, international financial markets and instruments, foreign-investment analysis, and management of ongoing operations.  It also exposes students to a wide range of issues, concepts, and techniques pertaining to international finance.

  
  •  

    FREN 101 - (CF) Beginning French

    3 cr.
    Designed to impart a good basic foundation in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing the French language.  Designed primarily for students with little or no background in the French language.  Taught in French.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    FREN 102 - (CF) Beginning French

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: FREN 101  is normally the prerequisite to 102)

    Designed to impart a good basic foundation in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing the French language.  Designed primarily for students with little or no background in the French language.  Taught in French.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    FREN 203 - French Cultural Heritage

    3 cr.
    This course aims to develop understanding of the culture, literature and civilization of France.  Representative readings from different periods.  Lectures, discussions and readings in English.
  
  •  

    FREN 211 - (CF,D) Intermediate French

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 101 -FREN 102  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam)

    Designed to give greater scope and depth to the student’s knowledge of the French language and Francophone culture.  Taught in French.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  

  
  •  

    FREN 212 - (CF,D) Intermediate French

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 101 -FREN 102  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam; FREN 211  or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212)

    Designed to give greater scope and depth to the student’s knowledge of the French language and Francophone culture.  Taught in French.   Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  Completion of FREN 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.

  
  •  

    FREN 311 - (CF,D) French Conversation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 211  FREN 212  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam)

    Intensive French conversation, emphasizing cross-cultural comparisons and development of self-expression in French.  Taught in French. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    FREN 312 - (CF,W) French Composition

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 211 -FREN 212  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam)

    An intensive course in writing in French, stressing grammar, writing analysis and composition.  Taught in French. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    FREN 315 - (D) Survey of French Culture and Civilization

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    A review of the geography, history, art and other components of the heritage of continental France, from antiquity to the present.  Taught in French.

  
  •  

    FREN 316 - (D) Survey of Francophone Culture and Civilization

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    A historical view of the cultural contribution and heritage of French-speaking peoples living outside continental France.  Taught in French.

  
  •  

    FREN 319 - Business French

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311  FREN 312  or equivalent)

    Overview of the spoken and written language of the French business world.  Formalities and conventions of letter writing, banking, import/export, and other commercial transactions.   Analysis of terminology from business-related areas such as finance, insurance and international commerce within a contemporary cultural setting.  Taught in French.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    FREN 320 - (CL,W) Introduction to French Literature

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    An introduction to the principal literary genres of poetry, novel, short story, essay and drama, through analysis of representative works in the French tradition.  Strongly recommended as a prerequisite for all upper-division literature courses in French.  Taught in French.

  
  •  

    FREN 325F - (D,W) French-Francophone Politics and Society

    3 cr.
    The course addresses the historical, social and cultural aspect of France’s imperialistic expansion, with particular emphasis on French relations, past and present, with the African colonies.   FREN 325F can count towards the major or minor by arrangement with the professor.  Taught in conjunction with FREN 333 .
  
  •  

    FREN 333 - French Practicum

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Enrollment in a FLaC course, that is, a course listed as E and F, English language or Foreign language credit bearing.) 

    A one-credit course in the target language to supplement FLaC courses (Foreign Language across the Curriculum) taught in English.  In addition to doing their reading and writing in the target language, students receiving credit in the target language will meet an additional hour per week for discussion in that language.

  
  •  

    FREN 430 - Women Writers of the Francophone World

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: FREN 311  FREN 312  311-312 or equivalent)

    Women’s view of themselves and the world as reflected in their literary creations. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies Concentration. (See Women’s Studies Concentration  section.) Taught in French.
  
  •  

    FREN 431 - (D,W) Literature of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

    3 cr.
    This course provides an overview of different literary genres and literary currents through in depth reading and analysis of exemplary texts written in French in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
  
  •  

    FREN 432 - French Short Story

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    Principal practitioners of the short story in French, including contemporary authors.
  
  •  

    FREN 433 - Twentieth-Century French Drama

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    The development of dramatic forms from the Théâtre Libre to the present.

  
  •  

    FREN 435 - The French Theater

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    An inquiry into the various forms of the French theater through a study of significant representative works from different periods.

  
  •  

    FREN 437 - Francophone Literature

    3 cr.
    This course provides an overview of different forms of literary expression throughout the Francophone world, from Africa to Haiti to Quebec.  Emphasis will be on main literary currents, ideology, political climates, and linguistic traditions in each country.
  
  •  

    FREN 439 - The Craft of Translation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent)

    A study of the techniques of translation with emphasis on accurate terminology and proper syntax when translating newspaper articles, legal documents, medical records, business records and correspondence, essays, poems, songs, and short fiction.

  
  •  

    FREN 482 - Guided Independent Study

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    Tutorial content determined by mentor.

  
  •  

    FREN 483 - Guided Independent Study

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: FREN 311 -FREN 312  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    Tutorial content determined by mentor.

  
  •  

    GEOG 134 - (S) World Regional Geography

    3 cr.
    Introduces the major concepts and skills of geography.  A regional approach stresses the five themes of geography including location, place, human environment interaction, movement and region.
  
  •  

    GEOG 217 - (D,S) Cultural Geography

    3 cr.
    Study of the influence of geography on the origin, structure, and spread of culture.  Focuses on describing and analyzing the ways language, religion, economy, government and other cultural phenomena vary or remain consistent from place to place.
  
  •  

    GERM 101 - (CF) Beginning German

    3 cr.


    (GERM 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102.) 

    A complete course in the fundamentals of the German language.  Emphasis on reading of graded texts, with written, oral and aural exercises.  Designed for students with little or no background in the German language.  Taught in German.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    GERM 102 - (CF) Beginning German

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: GERM 101  is normally the prerequisite to 102)

    A complete course in the fundamentals of the German language.  Emphasis on reading of graded texts, with written, oral and aural exercises.  Designed for students with little or no background in the German language.  Taught in German.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    GERM 211 - (CF,D) Continuing German I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 101 -GERM 102  or equivalent)

    Reading from modern authors of moderate difficulty.  Oral and written exercise.  Systematic review of German grammar.  Taught in German.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  Completion of GERM 212  satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.

  
  •  

    GERM 212 - (CF,D) Continuing German II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 101 -GERM 102  or equivalent; GERM 211  or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212)

    Reading from modern authors of moderate difficulty.  Oral and written exercise.  Systematic review of German grammar.   Taught in German.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  Completion of GERM 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.

  
  •  

    GERM 295 - (D) German Culture and Language

    3 cr.
    Intersession course to German, Austria and Switzerland.  Credits may be used in Free Area and Cultural Diversity but not for German major or minor.  Comparison of German and American cultures.  Study of history, music, political science, language and modern attitudes.  Team-taught by University faculty from several academic departments.
  
  •  

    GERM 311 - (CF, W) Advanced German Composition and Conversation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 211 -GERM 212  or equivalent)

    Selected texts in prose and poetry.  Advanced practice in conversation and composition.  Survey of German grammar.  Taught in German.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    GERM 312 - (CF,W) Advanced German Composition and Conversation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 211 -GERM 212  or equivalent)

    Selected texts in prose and poetry.  Advanced practice in conversation and composition.  Survey of German grammar. Taught in German.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    GERM 313 - (CL,D) Survey of German Literature and Culture

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 311 -GERM 312  or equivalent)

    A survey of German literature from the 11th century to the contemporary period, with special emphasis on the main intellectual currents as well as the social and political developments. Taught in German.

  
  •  

    GERM 314 - (CL,D) Survey of German Literature and Culture

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 311 -GERM 312  or equivalent)

    A survey of German literature from the 11th century to the contemporary period, with special emphasis on the main intellectual currents as well as the social and political developments. Taught in German.

  
  •  

    GERM 315 - (W,D,CF) Violence in Twentieth Century Germany

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Four completed semesters of college-level German or instructor permission) 

    Violence is a central problem in twentieth-century German culture and society. Our most common associations with “German” violences, including the two world wars and the Holocaust, are specific articulations of violence and brutality that together generate cultural and historical questions. Taught in German.

  
  •  

    GERM 317 - (W,D,CL) German Travel Writing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Four completed semesters of college-level German or instructor permission) 

    A survey of travel writing in German, ranging from Romantic ideas about travel and Bildung, to colonial explorations, 19th century emigration to the Americas, 20th century German and Jewish German exile, mass-tourism in Weimar and the Third Reich, and post World War II immigration.

  
  •  

    GERM 318 - (D,CL) Introduction to German Cinema

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: Completion of 4 semesters of college-level German or permission of instructor) 

    This masterpiece survey of German film offers students the opportunity to develop advanced skills and strategies for written and oral communication in German.  Students will consider key thematic, aesthetic, and political issues in films from the Weimar Republic; the Third Reich; post-war film; DEFA; New German Cinema; and re-unification.

  
  •  

    GERM 319 - Business German

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GERM 311 -GERM 312  or equivalent)

    Overview of the spoken and written language of the German business world.  Formalities and conventions of letter writing, banking, import/export, and other commercial transactions.  Analysis of terminology from business-related areas such as finance, insurance and international commerce within a contemporary cultural setting.  Taught in German. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    GERM 320E-320F - (W,D) Sex in the City: Gender and Modernity in Weimar Germany

    3 cr.
    The Weimar Republic (1919-1933) was formed in the wake of military and political conflicts and failed revolution.  This course explores relationships among the aestheticization of violence against women, their increased visibility in the labor force, and public expressions of women’s sexuality.  (May be taken in combination with a one-credit language practicum, GERM 333, for German credit.)
  
  •  

    GERM 333 - German Practicum

    1 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Enrollment in a FLaC course, that is, a course listed as E and F, English language or Foreign language credit bearing.) 

    A one-credit course in the target language to supplement FLaC courses (Foreign Language across the Curriculum) taught in English.  In addition to doing their reading and writing in the target language, students receiving credit in the target language will meet an additional hour per week for discussion in that language.

  
  •  

    GERM 482 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisites: GERM 311 -GERM 312  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    Tutorial content determined by mentor.

  
  •  

    GERM 483 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisites: GERM 311 -GERM 312  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    Tutorial content determined by mentor.

  
  •  

    GERO 110 - (S) Introduction to Gerontology

    3 cr.
    A multidisciplinary examination of the cognitive and affective aspects of aging. The course covers social, physiological, psychological, economic, and health aspects of aging, as well as service-delivery systems.  It explores planning and action strategies aimed at enhancing the quality of life and providing adequate benefits and services for the elderly.  (Credit cannot be earned for GERO 110 and HADM 110 .)
  
  •  

    GERO 216 - Aging and the Community

    3 cr.
    Consideration of selected community strategies effecting desired changes in the development and implementation of social services and programs for the elderly: legislative action, interagency relationships, the citizen role.  Students who have taken HADM 216 are not eligible to take GERO 216.
  
  •  

    GERO 218 - Health and Aging

    3 cr.
    An explorative study of the mental and physical health problems prevalent in the older adult population, with emphasis upon the preventive aspect of health care as applied by themselves and healthcare providers.  Health-care approaches appropriate to the various problems, and relevant resources within the home and community are considered.  (Credit cannot be earned for HADM 218  and GERO 218.)
  
  •  

    GERO 220 - Crime and Aging

    3 cr.
    A consideration of crime as it affects aging: examining the older adult as victim, offender, practitioner, and perpetrator, in light of current thought, policy, and law.
  
  •  

    GERO 232 - Aging and Death

    3 cr.


    This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the mystery and meaning of death. Focus is on a number of aspects of dying and the death process, such as the dying individual and the family; cross-cultural perspectives; terminal illness; professions and death; rites and rituals. (Credit cannot be earned for HADM 232  and GERO 232.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  
  •  

    GERO 284 - Special Topics in Gerontology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of the chair and the instructor) 

    Courses designed to meet specific needs of individual students or courses offered on a trial basis to determine the value of placing them into the regular curriculum.

  
  •  

    GRK 111 - (CF) Beginning Greek

    3 cr.
    An intensive course in the fundamentals of Classical Greek grammar, with readings from both Attic and Koine (New Testament). Offered in rotation with Hebrew.
  
  •  

    GRK 112 - (CF) Beginning Greek

    3 cr.
    An intensive course in the fundamentals of Classical Greek grammar, with readings from both Attic and Koine (New Testament) Greek texts in GRK 112. Offered in rotation with Hebrew.
  
  •  

    GRK 205 - (D) Legacy of Greece and Rome

    3 cr.
    Survey of the artistic and cultural treasures of classical Greece and Rome, with a focus on their enduring legacy in our own civilization.
  
  •  

    GRK 211 - Intermediate Greek

    6 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GRK 111 -GRK 112  or equivalent)

    Review of fundamentals. Readings from Zenophon, Euripides, and the New Testament.

  
  •  

    GRK 212 - Intermediate Greek

    6 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GRK 111 -GRK 112  or equivalent)

    Review of fundamentals. Readings from Zenophon, Euripides, and the New Testament.

  
  •  

    GRK 213 - (CL,D,W) Classical Greek Literature and Mythology

    3 cr.
    This course examines the role that mythology played in Greek literature, and examines the changing attitudes of the Greeks towards the Olympian gods from Homer to the fourth century B.C. All readings and lectures in English.
  
  •  

    GRK 220 - Ancient Civilization: Greece

    3 cr.
    The political, constitutional, and cultural history of Greece from the earliest times to the death of Alexander the Great. All readings and lectures in English.
  
  •  

    GRK 311 - Readings in Greek Literature

    1.5-3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GRK 211 -GRK 212  or equivalent)

    Selections from Greek writers to suit students’ special interests.

  
  •  

    GRK 312 - Readings in Greek Literature

    1.5-3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: GRK 211 -GRK 212  or equivalent)

    Selections from Greek writers to suit students’ special interests.

  
  •  

    GRK 482 - Guided Independent Study

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisites: GRK 211 -GRK 212  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    Tutorial content determined by mentor.

  
  •  

    GRK 483 - Guided Independent Study

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisites: GRK 211 -GRK 212  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    Tutorial content determined by mentor.

  
  •  

    HADM 110 - Introduction to Gerontology

    3 cr.
    A multi-disciplinary examination of the cognitive and affective aspects of aging.  The course covers social, physiological, psychological, economic, and health aspects of aging, as well as service-delivery systems.  It explores planning and action strategies aimed at enhancing the quality of life and providing adequate benefits and services for the elderly.  (Credit cannot be earned for GERO 110  and HADM 110.)
  
  •  

    HADM 111 - Introduction to Health Administration

    3 cr.
    An introduction to health care and public health in the United States.  Guest speakers and two site visits to local health care organizations are included.  
  
  •  

    HADM 112 - Health Systems

    3 cr.
    The nature and organization of health systems in the United States and select countries.  Knowledge of health services for diverse populations is emphasized.  Guest speakers and two site visits to local health care organizations are included.
  
  •  

    HADM 211 - (W) Health Administration

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: HADM 111  or HADM 112 )

    This writing-intensive course studies organization theory, behavior and management applied to health-care organizations.  Topics include leadership, conflict, organization structure, work groups, coordination, work design, communication, power, politics, change, strategy and performance effectiveness.

  
  •  

    HADM 212 - Health Administration Law

    3 cr.
    The legal and regulatory environment of health care and the administration of health care services.  Includes service-learning component.
  
  •  

    HADM 215 - Medical Terminology and Disease Management

    3 cr.
    This course introduces participants to medical terminology used in various fields of healthcare.  Basic techniques used in building medical terms is covered, using a systems approach to foster understanding of usage of such terms related to body structures and medical conditions.  Medical terminology will be reinforced within the concept of disease management, during which participants will become informed as to various ways used to improve the quality of life for patients.
  
  •  

    HADM 216 - Aging and the Community

    3 cr.
    Consideration of selected community strategies effecting desired changes in the development and implementation of social services and programs for the elderly: legislative action, inter-agency relationships, the citizen role. (Credit cannot be earned for GERO 216  and HADM 216.)
  
  •  

    HADM 218 - Health and Aging

    3 cr.
    An explorative study of the mental and physical health problems prevalent in the older adult population, with emphasis upon the preventive aspect of health care as applied by themselves and healthcare providers. Health-care approaches appropriate to the various problems, and relevant resources within the home and community are considered. (Credit cannot be earned for GERO 218  and HADM 218.)
  
  •  

    HADM 232 - Aging and Death

    3 cr.
    This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the mystery and meaning of death.  Focus is on a number of aspects of dying and the death process, such as the dying individual and the family; cross-cultural perspectives; terminal illness; professions and death; rites and rituals.  (Credit cannot be earned for GERO 232  and HADM 232.)
  
  •  

    HADM 284 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Selected topics of current interest in health administration offered on a variable basis such as health information technology, managerial epidemiology, international health systems, etc.
  
  •  

    HADM 293 - Research in Health Administration

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: HADM major; PSYC 210 )

    An introduction to research methodology as applied to health administration issues and problems with an emphasis on experimental and quasi-experimental designs.
  
  •  

    HADM 312 - Health Finance

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 253  or ACC 254  or permission of the instructor)

    An introduction to financial and accounting concepts for health care providers.  Emphasis is placed on knowledge of third-party reimbursement and budgeting concepts.

  
  •  

    HADM 314 - Health Policy

    3 cr.
    Public policy in the health-care sector is studied, including the process of policy making. Implications of governmental policies for health-care organizations and administrators are discussed.
  
  •  

    HADM 315 - (D) Cultural Diversity and Health Administration

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HADM major or minor; HADM 211  or permission of instructor)

    The principles of management of culturally diverse society as applied to the health care field.  Emphasis is placed on the importance of assessing and addressing the health care needs of various cultural groups within a given health care service area.  Includes service-learning component.

  
  •  

    HADM 316 - Health Care Marketing

    3 cr.
    Marketing theories, concepts and strategies as applied to the health-care field.  Define the marketing process.  Students learn the development of a marketing plan.
  
  •  

    HADM 318 - Long-Term Care Administration

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the management of long-term care facilities.  Emphasis is placed on the differences between acute and long-term care, institutional and community-based long-term care services, and special concerns of the long-term care resident.  Site visits to long-term care facilities are included.
  
  •  

    HADM 330 - Managed Care

    3 cr.
    The course provides an overview of managed care, current market trends and market performance issues.  Closed and open panels, managed care contracting, disease management, behavioral health services and managed Medicare/Medicaid programs are also covered.  Case studies of successful managed care programs are included throughout the course.
  
  •  

    HADM 331 - International Health Care

    3 cr.
    This course examines international health-care services and systems, global integration, public health, expatriation, global competition, transnational enterprises, conceptual models, comparative management, international strategies, health-care issues and problems, health-care processes and functions in international businesses, cross-cultural management, intercultural communication, and leadership across cultures.
  
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    HADM 332 - Health Information Technology

    3 cr.
    This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of the present and future use of health information technology.  It is intended for undergraduate students in health care and information technology with an interest in health-related applications.
  
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    HADM 333 - Managerial Epidemiology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: HADM 111  and/or HADM 112  or equivalent; a course in health statistics is recommended but not required)

    This course focuses on epidemiological themes, including study design and data analysis, and introduces causal thinking and causal reference leading to measures of occurrence and measures of effect.  The student learns how to analyze epidemiological research studies.

  
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    HADM 380 - Internship in Health Administration

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: HADM 390 , 18 HADM credits or approval of program director)

    A supervised Health Administration work experience within an approved organizational setting.  Requires 120 hours in the field and a minimum of 18 hours of on-campus, faculty-led seminar. Graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Students must provide their own transportation.

  
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    HADM 390 - Career Seminar

    1 cr.
    A survey of current trends and occupations in health administration, with an emphasis on advanced planning and preparation for the required internship experience. 
  
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    HADM 441 - Issues in Health Care Administration

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: HADM senior) 

    A capstone course in which students demonstrate knowledge attained throughout the HADM curriculum as well as the ability to apply that knowledge in a practical manner through completion of a “mega case study” utilizing a small administrative group/team approach. Includes service-learning component.

  
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    HADM 480 - Internship in Long-Term Care Administration

    12 cr.


    (Prerequisite: approval of HADM director) 

    A practical internship in a licensed long-term care facility under the supervision of a licensed nursing home administrator.  Students spend 520 hours per semester in the field placement and 15 hours in on-campus seminars.  Students must accumulate 1,000 hours of internship experience by taking HADM 480 in both the fall and spring semesters of their senior year.   Students must provide their own transportation.

  
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    HADM 481 - Internship in Health Administration

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: HADM 380 )

    A supervised Health Administration work experience of 150 hours within an approved organizational setting. Graded satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Students must provide their own transportation.

  
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    HD 224 - Family Development

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: PSYC 110 )

    This course will explore the reciprocal interactions among children and parents as related to the development of all individuals in the family.  Topics covered include the roles of family members, parenthood and marriage, parenting at specific developmental stages, families with single parents, families with exceptional children, and child abuse. Not reqularly scheduled.

  
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    HD 325 - Abnormal Child Psychology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: PSYC 110 , PSYC 225 )

    This course will consider atypical social, emotional, and mental development during childhood and adolescence.  Topics include mental retardation, intellectual giftedness, learning disabilities, psychopathology of childhood and adolescence, and conduct disorders.  (Credit cannot be earned for both PSYC 325  and HD 325.) Scheduled every other year.

 

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