May 19, 2022  
Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    SOC 218 - Sociological Theory

    3 cr.
    An examination of the major theoretical developments in sociological theory from the classical period of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary schools such as structural-functionalism, conflict theory, exchange theory, and symbolic interaction.
  
  •  

    SOC 219 - Community Organization

    3 cr.
    A general introduction to the process of community organization, as a field of both social work and human endeavor. The coordination and financing of welfare activities, methods of appraising community needs and resources, planning and the initiation of welfare services. Services of a voluntary and governmental nature, strategies of power.
  
  •  

    SOC 220 - (S,D) Social Stratification

    3 cr.
    This course will investigate the varying levels of inequality in our society, based on the intersections of race, class, and gender. An assessment of various social inequality issues and institutional realms, such as politics and the economy, will be made from a sociological perspective.
  
  •  

    SOC 224 - (S,D) Race and Ethnic Relations

    3 cr.
    An introduction to the sociology of race and ethnicity, this course focuses on the historical construction and continued significance of these categories over time. Various racial and ethnic group experiences will be studied in terms of their treatment by dominant social institutions and their access to social, cultural, and political power in the United States.
  
  •  

    SOC 226 - Sociology of Work and Professions

    3 cr.
    The nature and role of contemporary occupations and professions in the life cycle are discussed; occupational choice, career patterns and occupational mobility are noted. The student is made aware of the relationship among education, work and aspirations. The career path from entry-level job to retirement is examined.
  
  •  

    SOC 228 - Social Psychology

    3 cr.
    Study of individual behavior as affected by cultural and social stimuli. Emphasis on the analysis of human conduct in social settings.
  
  •  

    SOC 230 - Sociology of Globalization

    3 cr.
    This course will investigate the major theories and processes of globalization from a sociological perspective, including neoliberalism, feminist theory, world systems theory, and world cultures theory. Topics will include global inequalities based on race, gender, and social class, economic, political, and cultural globalization, and global environmental problems.
  
  •  

    SOC 234 - (S,D) Cultural Anthropology

    3 cr.
    Cultural and social organization among primitive or preliterate societies: marriage, property, religion, magic and tribal control. Significance of the study of primitive cultures for understanding of urban industrial civilizations.
  
  •  

    SOC 284 - Special Topics in Sociology

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: Consent of the chair and the instructor)

    Courses designed to meet specific needs of individual students or courses offered on a trial basis to determine the value of placing them into the regular curriculum.
  
  •  

    SOC 315 - Feminism and Social Change

    3 cr.
    This course examines the relationship between feminism and social change, studying feminist movements and how feminist ideologies, strategies, and individuals influenced social movements. It also explores outcomes of women’s movements, the mobilization of counter-movements, and the consequences of feminism for society for various organizational and professional roles and for individual women.  (Credit cannot be earned for WOMN 215  and SOC 315.)
  
  •  

    SOC 317 - (D,W) Family Issues and Social Policy

    3 cr.
    This service-learning course examines family problems of work and poverty, separation and divorce, family violence, and elder care, addressing each in terms of describing the social problem and why it exists and the program/policies designed to address it. Students are offered solutions and are helped to apply multicultural interpretations.
  
  •  

    SOC 323 - (D) Great American Cities

    3 cr.
    A sociological exploration of selected major U.S. cities will review a variety of cultures and examine that matrix of ideas, creeds, religions, races, ethnicities, attitudes, habits, artifacts and institutions – social, educational, artistic, political and economic – which condition the way the people in each city live.
  
  •  

    SOC 328 - Child Welfare

    3 cr.
    Development of child welfare in the United States. Educational, health, recreational and child-labor regulations. Study and treatment of children in their own homes, foster homes and institutions. Child care and protective programs on federal, state and local levels.
  
  •  

    SOC 330 - Social Policy and Aging

    3 cr.
    Review of major legislation affecting older adults, including the Social Security Act, Older Americans Act, Medicare, and various local, state, and national programs for the aged.
  
  •  

    SOC 331 - Urban Sociology

    3 cr.
    Urban ecology and culture as the dominant form of community life in contemporary society; their characteristics, peculiarities, and problems.
  
  •  

    SOC 382 - Independent Study in Sociology

    1.5 cr.
    (Prerequisite: Consent of the chair and instructor)

    Designed for advanced students who are capable of independent study. A program of planned research under the guidance of a faculty member.
  
  •  

    SOC 383 - Independent Study in Sociology

    1.5 cr.
    (Prerequisite: Consent of the chair and instructor)

    Designed for advanced students who are capable of independent study. A program of planned research under the guidance of a faculty member.
  
  •  

    SOC 480 - Internship in Social Work

    1.5 cr.
    (Prerequisite: junior or senior standing; permission of instructor)

    Supervised experiential learning designed to broaden the educational experience of students through practical experience and work assignments with governmental and/or community agencies in the field of social work. Supervision by a faculty member and agency supervisor.
  
  •  

    SOC 481 - Internship in Social Work

    1.5 cr.
    (Prerequisite: junior or senior standing; permission of instructor)

    Supervised experiential learning designed to broaden the educational experience of students through practical experience and work assignments with governmental and/or community agencies in the field of social work. Supervision by a faculty member and agency supervisor.
  
  •  

    SOC 490 - Capstone Course in Sociology

    3 cr.


    (Pre-requisites:  SOC 110 , S/CJ 212 , S/CJ 215 , and SOC 218 , or by permission of instructor)

    As a Capstone Experience in Sociology, this class will give students the opportunity to engage in professional socialization, collaborative learning with other students, and to produce an original research paper on a topic of sociological interest.

  
  •  

    SPAN 101 - (CF) Beginning Spanish

    3 cr.
    Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, conversation; suitable readings and written exercises. Designed primarily for students with little or no background in the Spanish language.  Taught in Spanish. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    SPAN 102 - (CF) Beginning Spanish

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: SPAN 101  is normally the prerequisite to 102)

    Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, conversation; suitable readings and written exercises. Designed primarily for students with little or no background in the Spanish language. Taught in Spanish. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    SPAN 211 - (CF,D) Intermediate Spanish

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 101 -SPAN 102  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam)

    Grammatical review, written and oral composition with selected cultural readings of intermediate difficulty.  Taught in Spanish.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  Completion of SPAN 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements. 

  
  •  

    SPAN 212 - (CF,D) Intermediate Spanish

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 101 -SPAN 102  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam; SPAN 211  or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212)

    Grammatical review, written and oral composition with selected cultural readings of intermediate difficulty. Taught in Spanish.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources. Completion of SPAN 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.

  
  •  

    SPAN 295 - (CF,D,S) Contemporary Mexican Culture and Language

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 211  or higher)

    An intersession travel course to Mexico; 3 credits in Humanities (foreign language area) and cultural diversity credit.  Team taught by University faculty from the department of World Languages with assistance from local Mexican faculty.  Taught in conjunction with PS 295 .  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources. 

  
  •  

    SPAN 296 - (CL,D) Topics in the Culture, Civilization, and Literature of Latin America

    3 cr.
    Travel course: develops understanding of the culture, literature and civilization of Latin America. Taught in English. Students desiring credit in Spanish must do all readings and writing in Spanish and meet with professor for discussions in Spanish.
  
  •  

    SPAN 311 - (CF,D) Spanish Conversation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 211 -SPAN 212  or equivalent, as determined by placement exam)

    Reading-based conversation stressing development of self-expression in Spanish.  Taught in Spanish.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 312 - (CF,W) Spanish Composition

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 311  or equivalent)

    Intensive writing practice stressing grammar, writing analysis, and composition.  Taught in Spanish. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 313 - (CF,D) Spanish Culture and Civilization

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent)

    An overview of the diverse historical, political, religious and artistic factors that have determined the cultural make-up of the peoples of the Iberian peninsula.  Taught in Spanish. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 314 - (D,W) Latin-American Culture and Civilization

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent)

    The course examines the diverse cultural, historical, linguistic, religious, and political features of Latin America.  Taught in Spanish.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 315 - Medical Spanish

    3 cr.


    (Formerly SPAN 310)  (Prerequisites: SPAN 311  or equivalent)

    Designed for the student who plans to work in any area of health care, this course focuses on the needs and problems of Spanish-speaking patients.  Students learn specialized vocabulary and improved communicative ability through conversation and composition and develop an increased awareness of health issues often of particular concern to Hispanics. Taught in Spanish.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 319 - Business Spanish

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent)

    Overview of the spoken and written language of the Spanish business world. Formalities and conventions of letter writing, banking, import/export, and other commercial transactions. Analysis of terminology from business-related areas such as finance, insurance and international commerce within a contemporary cultural setting.  Taught in Spanish. Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 320 - (CL) Introduction to Hispanic Literature

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312 )

    An introduction to the principal genres of literature (poetry, short story, essay, drama and novel) through analysis of representative works in the Hispanic tradition.  Required prerequisite for all upper-division literature courses.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 321 - (W) Advanced Conversation and Stylistics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent)

    Designed to achieve more sophisticated use of Spanish, both orally and in writing. Includes intensive examination of compositions and translation exercises, as well as discussion of areas of particular difficulty for the non-native speaker (e.g., false cognates and unfamiliar structures).  Taught in Spanish.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    SPAN 330 - (CL) History of Spanish Literature

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 320 )

    Study of Spanish literature from Cantar de Mio Cid to 20th century, with emphasis on main literary currents in each century. Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 331 - (CL,D) Survey of Spanish-American Literature

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 320 )

    A survey of Spanish-American literature from the 16th century to the present, with representative readings from each of the principal cultural areas.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 335 - (D) Service and the Hispanic Community

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent)

    Focus on Hispanic cultures and traditions, the immigrant experience and cultural displacement.  Each student, with assistance from local social service agencies, Collegiate Volunteers and the course professor, develops and carries out a service project to the local Hispanic community involving 40 to 45 hours of service work.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 413 - Topics in Hispanic Prose

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 320 )

    Prose fiction of Spain and/or Spanish America.  Topics may focus on an author, a period, a movement, a country or region, or a theme. Content may vary and the course may, therefore, be repeated for credit with consent of department chair.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 421 - Twentieth-Century Spanish Drama

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 320 )

    Peninsular drama of the 20th century including dramatic forms after Buero Vallejo and new directions of Spanish theatre in the post-Franco era.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 422 - Spanish-American Drama

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 320 )

    Spanish-American drama from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on contemporary trends.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 430 - (CL,D) Hispanic Women Writers

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 320 )

    This course examines writing by Hispanic women, including prose, poetry, drama and essays, and investigates the social, political, aesthetic, and feminist contexts of their writing. Cross-listed with Women’s Studies. (See Women’s Studies Concentration  section.)  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 433 - Hispanic Lyric Poetry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: SPAN 320 )

    The development of lyric poetry in the Spanish-speaking world.  Examples of early poetry in Spain and Spanish America are studied to establish an awareness of the Hispanic lyric tradition, but the main focus of the course is on 20th-century Spanish America and such figures as Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, and Cesar Vallejo. Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 434 - Hispanic Film and Society

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent)

    An in-depth exploration of cultural issues as portrayed in a variety of classical and modern films from Spain and/or Latin America by directors such as Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, Pedro Almodóvar, Guillermo del Toro, and María Luisa Bemberg.  Examination and comparison of source texts where available.  Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 439 - The Craft of Translation

    3 cr.
    Study of the techniques of translation with emphasis on accurate terminology and proper syntax when translating newspaper articles, legal documents, medical records, business records and correspondence, essays, poems, songs, and short fiction. Taught in Spanish.
  
  •  

    SPAN 482 - Guided Independent Study

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    A tutorial program with content determined by mentor. Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    SPAN 483 - Guided Independent Study

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisites: SPAN 311 -SPAN 312  or equivalent; junior or senior standing)

    A tutorial program with content determined by mentor. Taught in Spanish.

  
  •  

    STAT 251 - (Q) Statistics for Business I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: C/IL 104  and one of the following:  ,  , MATH 108  or permission of instructor)

    Detailed coverage of descriptive statistics. An introduction to the elements of probability theory and decision theory, and index numbers.  The major discrete and continuous probability distributions are covered with an emphasis on business applications.  Data analysis will be done using appropriate software.

  
  •  

    STAT 252 - (Q) Statistics for Business II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: STAT 251 )

    A survey of inferential statistics, this course covers confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for proportions, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means, hypothesis tests for comparing two means (independent and paired), Chi square tests, inference for regression, multiple regression, building multiple regression models and the design and analysis of experiments.  Appropriate software is used for data analysis.

  
  •  

    STAT 253 - Statistics for Economics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: C/IL 104  and one of the following: MATH 106 , MATH 107 , MATH 108  or permission of instructor)

    Coverage of statistical tools to analyze economic data.  Topics include measures of central tendency, dispersion, probability distributions, index numbers, time series analysis, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.  Data analysis will be done using appropriate software.

  
  •  

    T/JP 310 - Toward a Just and Peaceful World

    3 cr.
    In this seminar students will assess the courses that have fulfilled their requirements for the Peace and Justice Concentration and will explore the religious, philosophical and social/ethical concerns of their undergraduate education. Each participant will prepare and present a paper which assesses how her/his courses have met the goals of the concentration and the University’s mission as it relates to the concern for justice.
  
  •  

    T/RS 121 - (P) Theology I: Introduction to the Bible

    3 cr.
    A survey of central texts and themes of the Bible. Its purpose is to develop biblical literacy as well as skills in interpreting various literary forms and key theological concepts.
  
  •  

    T/RS 121J - (P) Theology I: Introduction to the Bible

    3 cr.
    A survey of central texts and themes of the Bible. Its purpose is to develop biblical literacy as well as skills in interpreting various literary forms and key theological concepts.
  
  •  

    T/RS 122 - (P) Theology II: Introduction to Christian Theology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: T/RS 121 )

    A survey of key Christian themes: creation, Christ’s incarnation and redemption, the Church and sacraments, Christian personhood, and the practice of prayer, virtue, and hope for the future.

  
  •  

    T/RS 122J - (P) Theology II: Introduction to Christian Theology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: T/RS 121 )

    A survey of key Christian themes: creation, Christ’s incarnation and redemption, the Church and sacraments, Christian personhood, and the practice of prayer, virtue, and hope for the future.

  
  •  

    T/RS 210Z - (P,D) Jews, Christians, and the Bible

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 207) 

    A survey of ancient and modern ways of reading the Bible.  The focus will be on a group of central biblical figures whose stories will be examined in the context of ancient Israelite history and society. The biblical stories will then be compared with later elaborations by Jewish and Christian interpreters.

  
  •  

    T/RS 212 - (P) Saints and Holiness

    3 cr.
    An inquiry into the nature of Christian sanctity by an examination of the lives and accomplishments of traditional saints and of contemporary persons who respond to the Gospel message.
  
  •  

    T/RS 213 - (P) American Catholic Thought

    3 cr.
    The major themes of American Catholic tradition from colonial times to the present are placed in their historical, religious, social and political context.
  
  •  

    T/RS 214C - (P,W) Inside the Catholic Tradition

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 184C) 

    This introduction to Catholic Tradition will study its scope, depth, and ongoing development, reception, and characteristics.  Topics covered include Faith and Revelation, the intercommunion of Scripture and Tradition, the role of Magisterium, and the development of doctrine. Selected readings are taken from important conciliar texts and theologians.

  
  •  

    T/RS 215 - (P) The History of Christian Theology

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 210 & T/RS 215Z) 

    A study of the vital growth of Christianity’s life, doctrine, worship and spirituality over the centuries.  Special emphasis will be placed on principal leaders, thinkers and heroes.

  
  •  

    T/RS 216 - (P,D) Judaism in Modern Times

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 216Z) 

    This course is a detailed study of the history of modern Judaism (1700 to present) in all of its aspects, including Messianism, Hasidism, Jewish Emancipation, new Jewish religious movements, Zionism, Holocaust, and the rise of the State of Israel.

  
  •  

    T/RS 217 - (P,D) The Holocaust in Context: History and Theology

    3 cr.
    An exploration of the Holocaust through the perspective of the history of anti-Semitism. The course will examine the historical aspects of the Holocaust as well as the moral and theological issues raised by it.
  
  •  

    T/RS 218 - (P,D) Women in Christianity

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 315 and T/RS 218Z) 

    An exploration of some of the major roles women have played in Christian thought and experience, including their contributions as disciples, spiritual guides, and social critics.  Will also examine assumptions about male and female identities and consider challenges to traditional roles.

  
  •  

    T/RS 219 - (P,D) The Religions of the World

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 314 & T/RS 219Z) 

    An exploration of belief in the traditions of the classical historical religions of the world through both systematic analysis and the reading of sacred texts.

  
  •  

    T/RS 220 - (P) The Sacramental Imagination

    3 cr.
    A basic course which explores the significance of the sacraments for the Church and for the development of the Christian imagination.
  
  •  

    T/RS 221 - (P) Prayer

    3 cr.
    Introduction to the nature, purpose, and method of prayer in the Catholic Christian tradition.
  
  •  

    T/RS 222 - (P) Introduction to Christian Worship

    3 cr.
    This course explores how Christian worship and theology inform one another. Particular attention will be given to the liturgical roots of Christian theology.
  
  •  

    T/RS 223 - Introduction to the Theology of the Byzantine Churches

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 225 & T/RS 223Z) 

    The Byzantine theological tradition develops special emphases within the mainstream of the Christian tradition.  This course introduces the student to the study of some of the specifically Byzantine contributions to the understanding of the Christian mystery, with particular emphasis on early developments.

  
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    T/RS 224 - (P) Introduction to Eastern Liturgies

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 226 and T/RS 224Z) 

    A survey of the Eastern Eucharistic Liturgies with particular emphasis on the structure, history, and liturgical theology of the Byzantine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom.

  
  •  

    T/RS 225 - (P) A Theology of Marriage

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 240 & T/RS 225Z) 

    This course will introduce students to the theology of marriage.  It will focus on the distinctiveness of Christian marriage, its sacra mentality, marriage as a vocation and covenant, love and friendship in marriage, sex, singleness, family and children.  Questions of the state of the institution of marriage in contemporary culture will also be discussed.

  
  •  

    T/RS 226 - (P) Faith and Healing: God and Contemporary Medicine

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 313 and T/RS 226Z) 

    This course will consider the history of Western medicine in the light of a range of Christian notions such as that life is a gift from God, that the body is good, that illness is a (limited) evil, that health is a responsibility.  In this light, the idea that medicine is a calling and healing an art will be considered.

  
  •  

    T/RS 227Z - (P) Biomedical Ethics

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 330) 

    This course will present theological reflections on the main ethical theories undergirding contemporary biomedical ethics.  It will also present and discuss relevant philosophical and theological arguments on such issues as abortion, care of handicapped infants, euthanasia, suicide, and the profession of medicine.

  
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    T/RS 228 - (P) Parables in Pop Culture

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 214 and T/RS 228Z) 

    This course is designed to help students attend to and interpret the narratives of popular culture from the perspective of Christian faith.  We will discuss Jesus’ use of parables, engage the theological tradition of “finding God in all things,” and analyze a variety of artistic productions (movies, television and music) that represent dominant themes of contemporary culture.

  
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    T/RS 230 - (P) Moral Theology

    3 cr.
    A study of the Catholic moral tradition, its origins, development, key principles and debates. Areas of inquiry include human freedom, happiness, virtue, conscience, divine grace, natural law and the relation between morality and doctrine.
  
  •  

    T/RS 231 - (P) God and the Good Society

    3 cr.
    This course will work to provide a theological assessment of various political, moral, economic and social arrangements that have or might apply in human societies. Attention will be given to different descriptions of the Church’s right relation to the nation state, as well as of social justice, foreign relations, and/or legal systems.
  
  •  

    T/RS 232 - (P) Catholic Social Thought

    3 cr.
    An in-depth study of the Catholic perspective on the common good. Readings will be chosen from Augustine, Aquinas, papal social encyclicals and other contemporary sources. Areas of inquiry include the dignity of the human person, natural law and rights, the dialogue with political philosophy, social justice, law and public policy, and the role of the family.
  
  •  

    T/RS 233 - (P,W) Suffering

    3 cr.
    This course examines the way in which Christians and Jews narrate their suffering in the context of God’s purposes. Traditional formulations of “the problem of evil” will be critiqued, and the concept of redemptive suffering will be explored.
  
  •  

    T/RS 234 - (P,D) Twentieth-Century Peacemakers

    3 cr.
    A study of some of the principles and methods of “waging peace” found in the lives and writings of Mohandas Gandhi, Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton and Martin Luther King.
  
  •  

    T/RS 235 - (P) The Theology of Birth and Death

    3 cr.
    This course will investigate the meaning and significance of the birth and death of human beings in the Christian tradition. Related topics will be: suicide, euthanasia, capital punishment, contraception and abortion.
  
  •  

    T/RS 236 - (P) Prophets and Profits: The Economy in the Christian Life

    3 cr.
    An inquiry into the witness of the Church with regard to questions of wealth, business, economics and formulation of public policy. Biblical sources, Church tradition, and contemporary narratives will be employed to assess the common good.
  
  •  

    T/RS 240 - (P,W) Scrolls and Scriptures

    3 cr.
    (Formerly T/RS 240Z)

    This course will study the Dead Sea Scrolls. Questions regarding how the scrolls advance understanding of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity will be considered, as well as their relevance to biblical studies today.
  
  •  

    T/RS 241 - (P) Early Biblical Heroes and Villains

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 241Z)  (Prerequisites: T/RS 121 , T/RS 122 )

    This course will be a theological study of some of the historical books of the Old Testament, especially Joshua, Judges, and the four books concerning kings. Major figures and narratives, like those of King David and the prophet Elijah, will be the main focus.

  
  •  

    T/RS 242 - (P) Women in the Bible

    3 cr.
    This course surveys the variety of perspectives on women found in the Bible.
  
  •  

    T/RS 242H - Christian Ethics and Public Health

    3 cr.
    This course will explore one contemporary social and medical issue – the need for a functioning public health apparatus – and the ethical implications of an adequate public health system. The framework of the ethical analysis is Christian social ethics, especially Catholic Social Teaching as it understands “Common Good.”
  
  •  

    T/RS 243 - (P, D) Christ & Qur’an

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: T/RS 121  and T/RS 122 )

    After reviewing historical Christian-Muslim encounters, we examine the Church’s position on Islam, doctrinal points of contention, contemporary attempts at understanding Islam in the light of Christian faith, and Muslim attempts at understanding Christianity.  There will be opportunity for practical Christian-Muslim dialogue as well.  Students should have some background in Islam.

  
  •  

    T/RS 244 - (P) The Catholic Church and American Culture

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: T/RS 121  and T/RS 122 )

    This course will explore major points of conflict (and of harmony) between the official teaching of the Catholic Church and contemporary American culture.  Although the historical roots of various conflicts will be traced, the primary emphasis will be on the state of the conflict as we find it today.

  
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    T/RS 250 - (P,D) Latin American Liberation Theology and Beyond

    3 cr.
    The objective of the course is to explore the development of theology within Latin America after the Second Vatican Council (1962-65). Special attention is given the theological, social and political settings of Catholicism in Latin America.
  
  •  

    T/RS 295 - (P,D) Christianity in Africa

    3 cr.
    This travel course takes students to Uganda in East Africa. It covers the life and story of Ugandan Christianity since 1877, including the Uganda martyrs, the relationship between Anglicans and Catholics, and the role of Christian churches in Uganda culture, especially related to education, justice and medicine.
  
  •  

    T/RS 310 - (P) The Heart of the Old Testament

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 309 and T/RS 310Z) 

    An in- depth look at the five books of Moses (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy) using ancient and modern exegetical views to examine and emphasize the central theme of the Covenant.

  
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    T/RS 311 - (P) Job and the Psalter

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 306 & T/RS 311Z) 

    A close look at the wisdom literature of the Old Testament.  The study of both the Book of Psalms and the Book of Job will emphasize theological themes.

  
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    T/RS 312 - (P) The Great Prophets

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 308 and T/RS 312Z) 

    An examination of the four major prophets of the Old Testament: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, with an emphasis on the study of selected texts.

  
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    T/RS 313 - (P,W) Faith and Justice in the Prophetic Tradition

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 208 & T/RS 313Z) 

    The goals of contemporary Jesuit education are the service of faith and the promotion of justice.  This course will examine the roots of these ideals in the writings of the OT prophets, with special attention to Isaiah.

  
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    T/RS 314 - (P) Jesus in the Four Gospels

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 206 & T/RS 314Z) 

    A study of the historical, literary and theological significance of Jesus’ life and teaching as presented in the four canonical Gospels.

  
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    T/RS 315 - (P,W) John’s Gospel and Letters

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 304 & T/RS 315Z) 

    A close look at the Fourth Gospel and the Epistles of John with an emphasis on their literary, historical, and theological characteristics.

  
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    T/RS 316 - (P,W) Passion and Resurrection Narratives

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 307 & T/RS 316Z) 

    A study of the theology of each of the Gospels by an analysis of the key narratives of the Passion and Resurrection in the four Gospels.

  
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    T/RS 317 - (P) Pauline Letters

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 204 and T/RS 317Z) 

    An introduction to the writings of the Apostle Paul, exploring Jewish and Greco-Roman influences on his letters as well as his contribution to basic Christian beliefs and practices.

  
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    T/RS 318 - (P) The Apocalypse of St. John

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 305 & T/RS 318Z) 

    This introduction to the last book of the Bible will emphasize the literary forms and thought patterns of apocalyptic literature as well as the historical and theological character of the book itself, highlighting both textual interpretation and contemporary relevance.

  
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    T/RS 319 - (P,D,W) Judaism in the Time of Jesus

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 335 and T/RS 319Z) 

    A study of first-century Jewish religious sects as well as the cultural, political, and historical setting of the Roman Empire in which Jesus lived and preached and where monotheism continued to develop.

  
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    T/RS 320 - (P) Early Christian Writers

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 215 and T/RS 320Z) 

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the main figures, theological currents and ideas of the formative period of the history of Christian theology by a close reading of selected texts from the major authors of the first six centuries of the Church.

  
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    T/RS 321 - (P) Development of Christian Thought to 1100

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 218 and T/RS 321Z) 

    A survey of the principal theological, spiritual and institutional developments in the first millennium of the Church’s life.

  
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    T/RS 322 - (P) Development of Christian Thought 1100 to 1800

    3 cr.


    (Formerly T/RS 219 and T/RS 322Z) 

    Survey of the principal theological, spiritual, and institutional developments in the Church in the medieval, reformation, and early modern periods.

 

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