Aug 14, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2011-2012 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2011-2012 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    CHEM 464L - Polymer Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 330, CHEM 464) 

    Laboratory experiments investigate synthesis and characterization methods for polymers, structure- property effects, and thermal analysis of polymers. Three hours laboratory.

  
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    CHEM 470 - Forensic Chemistry

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 360 or 362) 

    Acquisition of forensic evidence through use of analytical techniques.  Statistical and multivariate analysis of data, and presentation of forensic evidence in a legal environment. Two hours lecture.

  
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    CHEM 470L - Forensic Chemistry Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 360L or 362L, CHEM 370, CHEM 370L; co-requisite: CHEM 470) 

    Acquisition of forensic evidence through use of analytical techniques.  Statistical and multivariate analysis of data, and presentation of forensic evidence in a legal environment. Four hours laboratory.

  
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    CHEM 490 - Advanced Topics in Biochemistry Capstone

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 450-451 or permission of the instructor) 

    The capstone course for students majoring in Biochemistry-Preprofessional Track.  Fundamentals of biochemistry are used to explore various themes in applied biochemistry.  Students are responsible for researching advanced topics and presenting lecture/discussions or case studies to the class.

  
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    CHEM 493 - (W) Undergraduate Research

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 233, 360 or 362, 390) 

    Individual study and research in connection with a specific chemistry or biochemistry problem.  Results must be written as a thesis and defended before the department. 1.5 credits each semester.

  
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    CHEM 494 - (W) Undergraduate Research

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 233, 360 or 362, 390) 

    Individual study and research in connection with a specific chemistry or biochemistry problem.  Results must be written as a thesis and defended before the department. 1.5 credits each semester.

  
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    CHS 111 - (S) Introduction to Human Adjustment

    3 cr.
    Introduction to human adjustment throughout the lifespan.  Focuses on discrimination of normal and abnormal behavioral and emotional responses to developmental life stages and to common developmental concerns.
  
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    CHS 112 - Human-Services Systems

    3 cr.
    Examines the human-services systems and institutions which have evolved as a response to human need.  Explores both the effect of social problems on individuals and families and the service systems designed to alleviate such problems.  Includes service learning component.
  
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    CHS 241 - (D) Case Management and Interviewing

    3 cr.
    The role of the human-services professional as a case manager or coordinator of services is examined. Initial interviewing skills and techniques are discussed with an emphasis on case conceptualization, problem identification, goal selection, evaluation, and follow-up. Includes service-learning component.
  
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    CHS 242 - Counseling Theories

    3 cr.
    The role of the human-services professional as an individual counselor or caseworker is examined. Theories and techniques as well as problems in individual counseling are explored.
  
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    CHS 284 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Courses developed to provide in-depth coverage of specific topics in human services.  Course title will be provided in advance of registration.  May be used only twice to satisfy major or minor elective requirement.
  
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    CHS 293 - (W) Research Methods in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    An introduction to research methodology as applied to problems in human-services agencies and settings.  Specific topics include descriptive, experimental, and quasi-experimental research methods.  Emphasis is placed on development of the student’s ability to be a critical consumer of research in human services.
  
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    CHS 322 - Cognitive Disabilities

    3 cr.
    Etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cognitive disabilities are presented.  This course examines both student and societal beliefs concerning persons with cognitive disabilities.  The implications of living with cognitive disabilities will be explored and the impact of disability culture as a means to facilitate the empowerment of children and adults with cognitive disabilities will be presented.
  
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    CHS 323 - Psychiatric Rehabilitation

    3 cr.
    An examination of the problems associated with mental and emotional disturbances.  Emphasis is placed on contemporary modalities of rehabilitation as they relate to community mental-health programs, and innovative non-medical treatment approaches.  Critical issues in mental health will be discussed.
  
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    CHS 325 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disordered Eating

    3 cr.
    Designed to introduce students to the clinical descriptions of disordered eating and eating disorders along with knowledge of their complex nature.  This course will explore: biopsychosocial factors, medical and psychosocial consequences, and possible treatment modalities including prevention.
  
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    CHS 330 - Introduction to Art Therapy

    3 cr.
    Provides a broad overview of the field of art therapy.  The work of art therapists will be discussed along with the history, theory, practice, populations and applications of the field.  The course will be presented through lectures, readings and hand-on experiential work.
  
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    CHS 331 - Health and Behavior

    3 cr.
    Focuses on stress which affects thoughts, emotions, and the body.  Stress diseases of adaption include cancer, Type A Behavior, GI tract disorders along with stress-related thought disorders and emotional disturbances.  Students learn to apply relaxation, cognitive restructuring and record-keeping in the treatment of their own as well as others’ health.
  
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    CHS 333 - (D) Multiculturalism in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    Focuses on current social and cultural issues in human services and related fields.  Human development in a multicultural society will be examined and the basic objectives and dimensions of multicultural intervention will be defined.  Student self-awareness of values, attitudes, and beliefs will be emphasized. Includes service-learning component.
  
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    CHS 334 - Marital and Family Counseling

    3 cr.
    Theories of family counseling will be presented with specific attention to the structural and strategic approaches.  A variety of family counseling techniques and stages will be learned through the use of role play and videotaping The utilization of family counseling will be discussed. (Also listed as HD 234.)
  
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    CHS 335 - Administration in Human Services

    3 cr.
    Focuses on the development of skills and knowledge related to program and organizational development, and community-wide planning in human services.  Topics include organizational theory applied to human-services settings, consultation, supervision, planning, funding and training.
  
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    CHS 337 - (W, D) Counseling Girls and Women

    3 cr.
    This course is designed to explore the topic of counseling girls and women in a sociocultural, historical, and multicultural context.  Through the examination of the history of women (e.g., social construction of gender, identity) from a self-in-relation foundation, and feminist counseling and its role in de-pathologizing the importance of relationships to girls and women will be explored.
  
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    CHS 338 - Poverty, Homelessness and Social Justice

    3 cr.
    Focuses on developing and understanding of the social, historical and political dimensions of poverty and homelessness in the U.S. and explores the implications for distributive justice.   Students assess the effectiveness of the social policies and programs created to combat poverty and homelessness, and participate in course-required service learning and social action projects.
  
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    CHS 339 - Counseling Boys and Men

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHS 111, CHS 241) 

    Focuses on the development of boys and men and the social construction of masculinity within social and historical perspectives.  The impact of culture on development and the needs of boys and men that result receive special attention.  The role of the counselor in working with boys and men will be explored.

  
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    CHS 340 - Career Seminar

    1 cr.


    (Majors only; Prerequisite for CHS 380) 

    Designed to introduce the student in the Counseling and Human Services curriculum to counseling, human development and human-services occupations.  Short- and long-term goals are examined in preparation for employment or further study.

  
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    CHS 341 - Group Dynamics

    3 cr.
    A basic understanding of group dynamics and individual behavior in groups is presented. Methods of developing and organizing group programs are stressed.  Students participate in a group experience. Includes service-learning component.
  
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    CHS 342 - Foundations of Rehabilitation

    3 cr.
    Students will develop sensitivity, appreciation and understanding of what it means to have a disability.  Topics covered will include federal, state and community mandates, independent-living concepts, and the basic principles of rehabilitation.   A comprehensive review will occur of the variety of rehabilitation programs.   Ethical decision-making will be integrated into the course and students will learn to practice with cultural sensitivity.   Site visits to rehabilitation agencies and applied experiences will be provided.
  
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    CHS 343 - Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities

    3 cr.
    Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of the medical, functional and psychosocial aspects of a wide array of disabilities.  The emphasis will be holistic and person- centered.   Curriculum components include learning medical terminology, the use of medical information and discussion of psychosocial aspects of disability.   Students will have the opportunity to interact with persons with disabilities.
  
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    CHS 344 - Vocational Evaluation

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on the theme of assessment and employment of individuals with disabilities.  Students will discover the impact of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 and the ADA on employment concerns of persons with disabilities.  Students will compile and utilize assessment information such as prior records, test results, work samples and situational assessment.
  
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    CHS 380 - Internship in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHS 340) 

    The internship is a significant clinical and educational experience. It provides both a supervised practical experience in the student’s field and an opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills.  Students will spend a minimum of 150 hours in the field placement. (Prerequisite for CHS 481.)

  
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    CHS 421 - Addictions

    3 cr.
    An integrated biophysical model of addition and recovery is described.  Approaches to assessment, treatment and relapse prevention are covered.
  
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    CHS 422 - Substance-Abuse Education

    3 cr.
    Design, implementation, and evaluation of substance-abuse education and prevention programs.
  
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    CHS 423 - Issues in Substance Abuse

    3 cr.
    Legal and health consequences of substance abuse are examined.  Special attention is given to the role of family dynamics, recovery process, dual disorders and ethics in the counseling process.
  
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    CHS 439 - Spirituality in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.
    This course will assist students in understanding various models of spirituality and their potential integration into the counseling process.  Critical reflection on a variety of diverse spiritual perspectives and their implications for human services practice is encouraged.  Current research in the area of spirituality and counseling is examined.
  
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    CHS 440 - Job Development

    3 cr.
    An awareness of the changing world of work will be the backdrop for job analysis, labor-market surveys, vocational adjustment, job development and job placement.  Students will be exposed to both traditional and current models of employment for individuals with disabilities.  Coordination of services with collaborating agencies (e.g., social, financial and vocational) will be included.  Rehabilitation technology and adapted computer applications will be emphasized.
  
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    CHS 441 - Crisis Intervention

    3 cr.
    Theory and practice of crisis intervention as applied to common crisis situations such as suicide, battering, violent behavior, post- traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, sexual assault, and personal loss. Includes service-learning component.
  
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    CHS 480 - Internship in Rehabilitation Services

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHS 380) 

    The internship is specifically designed for students in the Rehabilitation Services concentration.  Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours in their field placement.  The internship provides a practical experience in the rehabilitation field and an opportunity to integrate course knowledge.

  
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    CHS 481 - Advanced Internship in Counseling and Human Services

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHS 380) 

    This advanced internship in Counseling and Human Services involves 200 hours in a community agency or organization.  This course is required.

  
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    CJ 110 - (S) Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 cr.
    A foundation course examining problems in the study of crime and criminal justice, basic elements of criminal law and constitutional rights, and the functions of, as well as the relationship between, major components of the criminal justice system; agencies and role of law enforcement; prosecution; the judicial process; and corrections.
  
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    CJ 230 - Crime Prevention

    3 cr.
    This course analyzes the basic theories of community policing, problem-solving policing and crime prevention.  The emphasis is on primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques.  Emphasis will be given to the various analytical approaches to the study of criminal profiling, terrorism and methods of planning.
  
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    CJ 237 - The Investigative Process

    3 cr.
    This course considers appropriate investigative procedures concerning major criminal investigations.  An analysis of specific investigative theories and courtroom applications will be conducted through learning simulation.  The homicide court problem will focus on the preservation and admission of evidence.
  
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    CJ 239 - Introductory Criminal Analysis

    3 cr.
    Focuses on the application of analytical techniques that support crime intervention and prevention strategies. Subspecialties include, but are not limited to: (1) criminal investigative analysis, (2) intelligence analysis and (3) intelligence analysis.  The analytical process incorporates innovative strategic and crime mapping tactical applications.
  
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    CJ 310 - Criminal Justice Process

    3 cr.
    A study of the law of criminal procedure, treating investigation and police practices, preliminary proceedings, and trial, as they relate to the development and structure of the American criminal justice system and as they affect offenders.
  
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    CJ 312 - Criminal Law

    3 cr.
    A study of substantive criminal law in view of its historical foundations, purpose, functions and limits; of crime and defenses generally; and of the elements which constitute certain specific crimes under state and federal statutes.
  
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    CJ 338 - Police Criminalistics

    3 cr.
    A course in crime scene reconstruction. Emphasis is on police criminalistics and the coordination of physical evidence with scientific laboratories.
  
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    CJ 382 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and instructor) 

    Directed projects and surveys in criminal justice, law enforcement, and corrections designed to give the student academic flexibility.

  
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    CJ 383 - Independent Study in Criminal Justice

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and instructor) 

    Directed projects and surveys in criminal justice, law enforcement, and corrections designed to give the student academic flexibility.

  
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    CJ 480 - Internship Experience

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) 

    Supervised experiential learning in an approved criminal justice setting, taken preferably in junior and senior year.

  
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    CJ 481 - Internship Experience

    1.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) 

    Supervised experiential learning in an approved criminal justice setting, taken preferably in junior and senior year.

  
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    CMPS 134 - Computer Science I

    3 cr.
    An introduction to programming concepts and methodology using an object-oriented programming language (currently Java).  Topics include problem analysis, abstraction, modularization, the development and use of algorithms, reuse, and the use of programming constructs including data types, classes, control structures, and methods.
  
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    CMPS 136 - Computer Programming II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 134) 

    For non-computing majors who want more object-oriented programming experience. Includes data structures, file processing, graphical user interfaces and event-driven programming. May not be used to satisfy the requirements of CMPS or CIS.  May not be taken by a student who has credit for CMPS 144.

  
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    CMPS 144 - Computer Science II

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 134 and MATH 114 OR 142) 

    This course emphasizes object-oriented software development, addressing both software engineering and programming.  Topics include modularization, abstraction, encapsulation/information hiding, software reuse, software testing, classic data abstractions (e.g., lists, trees) and algorithms (e.g., sorting, searching), recursion, program correctness, and basic algorithm analysis.

  
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    CMPS 202 - Web Design and Development

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: C/IL 102 or equivalent)


    A course that covers fundamental aspects of web design and development.  Topics include design principles, coding HTML and cascading style sheets, JavaScript to create dynamic web pages, server-side vs. client-side technologies, and using a Content Management System that separates design from content while making it easy for non-technical users to update a web site.  This is a technical course for students who do not necessarily have a technical background.  May not be used as part of any major in the Computing Sciences department.

  
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    CMPS 204 - Computer Forensics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 102/102L or its equivalent) 

    An introduction to the field of computer forensics emphasizing the collection and analysis of both persistent and volatile data from computer systems, networks, and storage media in a manner that is admissible in a court of law.  May not be used as a major elective for any major in the Computing Sciences Department.

  
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    CMPS 240 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 144) 

    An examination of the issues of data representation, algorithm structure, and encapsulation as they pertain to the development of object-oriented software.  Abstract data types studied include stacks, queues, binary trees, n-ary trees, and graphs. Various representation alternatives are analyzed and compared, trade-offs frequently encountered by software developers are discussed.

  
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    CMPS 250 - Machine Organization and Assembly Language Programming

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 144) 

    An introductory study of the organization and architecture of computers through an exploration of various virtual machines. Programming at the assembly-language level and interfacing with software components (primarily written in C). Topics include representation of data and instructions, computer arithmetic, memory hierarchies, instruction sets, addressing modes, digital logic, microprogramming, pipelining, and parallel processing.

  
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    CMPS 260 - Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240) 

    An examination of the fundamental models and concepts of computation – automata, formal languages, and grammars – and how they are related.  Church-Turing thesis; recursive and recursively enumerable sets; unsolvable problems; complexity of algorithms; Chomsky hierarchy.

  
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    CMPS 311 - Computer Networks and Security

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 136 or CMPS 144) 

    An introduction to intranets and wide-area networking including operating systems fundamentals, hardware considerations, deployment and administration of networks, security issues, intrusion detection/protection, firewalls, VPN’s and encryption.  May not be used to satisfy the requirements of the major.  May not be taken by a student who has credit for CMPS 354.

  
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    CMPS 312 - Web Technology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: C/IL 102 or equivalent, COMM 329, CMPS 311) 

    This course covers the fundamental aspects of developing and maintaining Web sites. It provides a thorough coverage of the structure and elements of HTML and JavaScript necessary to create commercial-quality Web sites.  Brief coverage will also be given to graphic design and multimedia content. Emphasis will be placed on client-side development although server-side issues will be considered.  May not be used as part of any major in the Computing Sciences Department.  Cannot be taken by a student who has credit for CMPS 202 or 356.

  
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    CMPS 330 - (W) Information Systems Analysis

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: C/IL 102/104 or CMPS 134) 

    Introduction to concepts and practices of information processing.  Computerized system requirements and techniques in providing appropriate decision-making information to management.

  
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    CMPS 331 - Information Systems Development

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 330) 

    A study of system-development methodology and the role played by the systems analyst in developing user-accepted information systems.

  
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    CMPS 340 - File Processing

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 144 required, CMPS 240 recommended.) 

    File structures concepts and file processing applications.  Topics include file maintenance and storage management; file searching, sorting, and merging; consequential processing; index structures; B-trees; hash tables; indexed sequential files; database concepts.

  
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    CMPS 341 - Database Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 340 required, CMPS 240 recommended) 

    An introduction to database management systems with an emphasis on relational database design and applications.  It uses an appropriate database package such as ORACLE or PostgreSQL.

  
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    CMPS 344 - Programming Languages

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240) 

    A study of programming languages from both the theoretical and practical perspectives.  A survey of major and developing paradigms and languages is undertaken which includes use of specific languages to broaden the student’s experience.  Implementation is studied through an introduction to language translation along with a study of run-time models and interfaces with virtual machines.

  
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    CMPS 350 - Computer Architecture

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 250) 

    A study of the logical structure of computer-system organization including a survey of logic and design with an emphasis on functional components.  Topics include instruction sets, hard-wired and microprogrammed control-unit designs, memory systems (caches and virtual memory), I/O systems (interrupts, DMA, and channels).  Overview and examples of alternative and advanced computer architectures (pipeline, array processors, multiprocessors).

  
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    CMPS 352 - Operating Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 240, CMPS 250) 

    An introduction to the principles of operating systems.  Topics include operating system structure, process management, scheduling and dispatching, process synchronization and interprocess communication, memory management, virtual memory, device management, I/O, and file systems.

  
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    CMPS 354 - Data Communications and Networks

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 352) 

    A study of data communication and networking concepts, including distributed-system architectures, electronic interfaces, data-transmission, data link protocols, terminal networks, computer communication, public-data networks, and local-area networks.

  
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    CMPS 356 - Web Programming

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 240, HTML experience to the level where the students are capable of developing their own Web page) 

    This course covers all aspects of programming on the World Wide Web.  This includes the presentation of HTML, Java, JavaScript and CGI.  Topics include advanced HTML (maps, forms, etc.) client-server programming basics as they relate to the Web, Java machine concepts, Java/JavaScript similarities and differences, server-side programming, GIF animations, Web programming resources and environments.

  
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    CMPS 358 - Real-Time Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 352) 

    A study of issues related to systems that interface with the physical world and must meet the timing constraints imposed on them.  Topics include: real-time hardware architecture, real-time operating systems, invoking and managing threads and processes, interprocess communications and synchronization, manipulating process priority, concurrent programming, exception handling, software safety, reliability, and fault tolerance.

  
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    CMPS 360 - Analysis of Algorithms

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240) 

    A survey of methods for designing and analyzing algorithms. Classic algorithms from graph theory, combinatorics and text processing are examined, as are traditional design strategies such as divide-and-conquer, backtracking and dynamic programming.  Other topics include NP-completeness and parallel algorithms.

  
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    CMPS 362 - Numerical Analysis

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 134, MATH 222) 

    A survey of numerical methods for solving equations, integration, differentiation, interpolation, differential equations, and linear algebra, and the analysis of error.

  
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    CMPS 364 - Theory of Computation

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 260) 

    The development of a theoretical notion of computability and its relationship to Turing computability and recursive functions; the study of the relationships between automata, formal languages and grammars.

  
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    CMPS 370 - Computer Graphics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240 and 250) 

    An introduction to the hardware, software and techniques used to generate graphical representations by computer.  Two and three dimensional concepts, algorithms and architectures are studied. An essential aspect of the course involves the development of programs utilizing appropriate APIs (currently OpenGL is emphasized) as a means of developing expertise.  Advanced topics may be pursued as appropriate.

  
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    CMPS 372 - Artificial Intelligence

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240) 

    Problem solving using expert systems, heuristic programming techniques, tree speed-up techniques, and learning mechanisms.

  
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    CMPS 374 - (W) Fundamentals of Software Engineering

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 240) 

    An introduction to the concepts of Software Engineering.  Stress is placed upon formal models for the design and development of high-quality software.  Topics include: project planning, requirements analysis, system design, program design, program implemenation, program testing, system testing, system delivery, and maintenance.  A group project will be included.

  
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    CMPS 376 - Rapid Prototyping

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 136 or CMPS 144) 

    Some common applications using a database with a visual interface (perhaps Web based) can be successfully treated using Rapid Prototyping (a.k.a. Rapid Application Development).   This course will cover the synergy of combining a visual language and a relational database employing rigorous design techniques.

  
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    CMPS 384 - Special Topics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: as published) 

    Some recent courses have covered Rapid Prototyping, Real-Time Systems, and Parallel Computing.  A syllabus including prerequisites is published prior to the registration period for the course.

  
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    CMPS 393 - Computer Research

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: departmental permission) 

    A research project carried out by a student under the direction of a faculty member in the department.  The results will be prepared in a form suitable for publication.  Reader fee.

  
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    CMPS 440 - Compiler Design

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CMPS 344) 

    Study of techniques and problems involved in constructing compilers.  Lexical analysis, syntax analysis, semantic analysis, symbol-table management, code generation, code optimization.

  
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    CMPS 481 - Computer Internship

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: departmental permission) 

    An extensive job experience in computing which carries academic credit.  Prior approval is required; information is available on the department Web site.

  
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    CMPS 490 - (W) Computer Projects

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: senior standing, departmental permission) 

    In this course, students prepare and present individual computer projects to be evaluated by the instructor and their fellow students.

  
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    CNS 101 - (CF) Beginning Chinese

    3 cr.


     

    A learner-based, performance-based and task-based approach to Chinese, this course focuses on the development of the students’ ability to comprehend and communicate in the Chinese language.  It provides training in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Introduces aspects of Chinese culture. (CNS 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102)   Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    CNS 102 - (CF) Beginning Chinese

    3 cr.
    A learner-based, performance-based and task-based approach to Chinese, this course focuses on the development of the students’ ability to comprehend and communicate in the Chinese language. It provides training in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Introduces aspects of Chinese culture. (CNS 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
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    CNS 211 - (CF) Intermediate Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 101-102 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Emphasizes development of the full range of language skills – reading, listening comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication.  Class will be conducted almost entirely in Chinese. (CNS 211 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212.)  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    CNS 212 - (CF) Intermediate Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 101-102 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Emphasizes development of the full range of language skills – reading, listening comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication.  Class will be conducted almost entirely in Chinese. (CNS 211 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212.)  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    CNS 311 - (CF,D) Advanced Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 211-212 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Completion of CNS 312 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.  An integrated, learner-focused course that develops reading, writing, listening and speaking along with cultural competency.  Conducted only in Chinese. (CNS 311 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 312.)  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    CNS 312 - (CF,D) Advanced Chinese

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CNS 211-212 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Completion of CNS 312 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.  An integrated, learner-focused course that develops reading, writing, listening and speaking along with cultural competency.  Conducted only in Chinese. (CNS 311 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 312.)  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
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    COMM 100 - Public Speaking

    3 cr.
    This is a performance class which emphasizes the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism of speeches.  Successful completion of COMM 100 or INTD 117 with a grade of C or better fulfills the public speaking requirement in the University’s General Education curriculum. (INTD 117 also fulfills the basic writing requirement.)
  
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    COMM 110 - Interpersonal Communication

    3 cr.
    An investigation and analysis of the process and nature of human communication and its intrapersonal and interpersonal attributes.
  
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    COMM 115 - (W) Writing for Communication

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: WRTG 107 or fulfillment of Writing Skills requirement) 

    An introduction to the major forms of writing for communication professions: corporate, print, radio/television production, public relations and advertising.  Students will focus on the development and improvement of writing, research and critical thinking skills.  Students must take and pass a grammar exam as part of the course.

  
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    COMM 130 - History of Electronic Media

    3 cr.
    The content of the course will address many humanities-based topics as they are related to mass media.  Such topics include media history, media technologies and their effects on cultural practices, economic structures of mass communication, media programming, and the role of media in society.
  
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    COMM 210 - (W) Logical and Rhetorical Analysis

    3 cr.
    A study of the principles of logic and persuasion, analysis of fallacies, and critical examination of the principles of structure in written and oral communication.  Practice in briefs and abstracts with an emphasis on precision and clarity.
  
  •  

    COMM 211 - Argumentation and Debate

    3 cr.
    This course concentrates on the techniques of argumentation, persuasion, debate, and forensics.  Focuses heavily on research, case construction and formal analysis.
  
  •  

    COMM 214 - Small Group Communication

    3 cr.
    An examination of research, techniques, and principles of small-group communication.  Topics include problem solving, decision making, conflict resolution, leadership theories, interaction strategies and participant roles.
  
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    COMM 215 - Introduction to Communication Theory

    3 cr.
    Introduces the rich body of theory and research in human communication.  Students will examine theories from the traditional contexts of the field: interpersonal, small group, public, organizational, mass media, intercultural and gender.  An emphasis is on applying the various theories to students’ communicative lives.
  
  •  

    COMM 221 - Radio Production

    3 cr.
    An examination of the dynamic industry roles of the radio producer/director.  Areas to be studied include production theory and techniques that apply to station and program promotions, advertising, news, and music formats.
  
  •  

    COMM 222 - Television Production

    3 cr.


     

    Designed to provide both theoretical background and practical application of television production in and outside the studio.  Various format types, production techniques and artistic styles are studied.  Opportunity for producing and directing television programs.

  
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    COMM 223 - Radio Journalism

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 221 or COMM 224 or COMM 328) 

    With a focus on gathering and preparing news for broadcast (concentrating especially on interviewing techniques), this class will investigate various news formats and styles.  At the mid-semester point, the class will begin operating as a news team.

  
  •  

    COMM 224 - (W) News Writing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: COMM 115) 

    Evaluating news, reporting and writing stories.  Newsroom organization.  Style and usage. Interviewing.  Feature writing.

  
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    COMM 225 - Advertising

    3 cr.
    This course explores advertising as an institution in society, utilizing research, media planning, and creative strategies.  Students will participate in the formulation of an advertising campaign.
  
  •  

    COMM 226 - Strategic Writing for Public Relations

    3 cr.


     

    Writing and editing of public relations and marketing communication materials such as press releases, speeches, direct mail, brochures, newsletter and Web sites.  Writing and editing for electronic media and video news.  Emphasis on integrated communications.

 

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