Aug 14, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2011-2012 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2011-2012 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    BIOL 274 - Conservation Biology (O,P)

    3 cr.
    Conservation biology is a multidisciplinary field that seeks to identify, understand and counter threats to the earth’s biodiversity. This course will provide students an understanding of conservation-related issues ranging from recognition of threats to biodiversity to preserve selection, design and management. Three hours lecture. Spring, odd years.
  
  •  

    BIOL 295 - (E,D) Philippines Organisms and Ecosystems (O,P)

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on field studies of abiotic factors, flora and fauna, interrelationships and indigenous cultures in different tropical ecosystems of the Philippines. The course involves a three-week trip (extra funds required), with local excursions to unique tropical rainforests, coral reefs, mangroves and/or volcanoes. Enrollment limited. Intersession only.
  
  •  

    BIOL 342 - Comparative Biomechanics

    4 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 241, 243, 245, 272, 273, 345, 349 or 374) 

    The application of basic principles from physics and mechanical engineering to understand how organisms work. Integrated lectures, labs, and discussions explore the limitations and opportunities the physical world provides to organisms. Topics vary but may include how flies fly, how bones break, and why mucus is so sticky.

  
  •  

    BIOL 344 - Principles of Immunology (C,O,M)

    4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 250 strongly recommended for 344 lecture, required for optional 344 lab) 

    The basic molecular, cellular and organismal aspects of the immune response, emphasizing chemical and functional bases of antigens and immunoglobulins, cellular and humoral response, tolerance, immune deficiency, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, blood groups, transplantation. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 345 - Comparative Animal Physiology (P,O)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 245) 

    The physiological principles involved in adaptations of animals to their environment from a comparative viewpoint; osmotic control, temperature regulation, nerve and muscle physiology, sensory perception, etc. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    BIOL 346 - Endocrinology and Reproduction (C,O)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 245) 

    The mammalian endocrine system; emphasis on molecular mechanisms of hormone action, feedback control of hormone production, integration with other physiological systems, and reproductive endocrinology. Three hours lecture. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 347 - Exercise Physiology (O)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 245) 

    Study of anatomical and physiological effects of exercise, centering around control of physical performance by capacity to generate energy through aerobic and anaerobic pathways; includes effects of heredity, age, nutrition, training and environment on performance. Emphasizes the multidimensional role of exercise in weight control, cardiovascular fitness, stress management, fatigue, strength, etc. Three hours lecture/demonstration. Spring, odd years.

  
  •  

    BIOL 348 - Functional Neuroanatomy (C,O)

    3 cr.


    (Also listed as NEUR 348) (Prerequisite: BIOL 245, or, for neuroscience majors, PSYC 231) 

    Study of the organization and function of the neuron, neural circuits, and the major sensory and motor components of the central nervous system; bioelectric phenomena, synaptic transmission; the neural basis for higher functions such as cognition, memory, and learning.

    Credits cannot be earned for NEUR 348 and BIOL 348.

  
  •  

    BIOL 349 - Plant Physiology (C,O,P)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or 141 or permission of instructor; lab is optional) 

    Functional anatomy and physiology of plants, including structure, photosynthesis, respiration, mineral nutrition, water relations, productivity, growth and differentiation, transport, stress physiology, and energy flow. Lab is writing-intensive (W). Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Spring, odd years.

  
  •  

    BIOL 350 - (W: lab only) Cellular Biology (C,M)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Study of structure and function in eukaryotic cells. Emphasis on biomolecules, cell organelles, cell motility, signaling, and cell physiology. The cellular basis of human physiology and disease will also be discussed. Labs focus on experimental studies of cellular structure and function using techniques of modern cell biology. Lab fulfills a writing-intensive (W) requirement. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

  
  •  

    BIOL 351 - Developmental Biology (C,O,M)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Development of vertebrates and invertebrates from gametogenesis through organogenesis. Emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in differentiation, morphogenesis, and determination of the body plan. Labs focus on experimentation with living, developing organisms. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 352 - Histology (C)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; BIOL 241 strongly recommended; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Microscopic structure and function of the four basic vertebrate tissues. Emphasis will be placed on mammalian tissues. Lectures include historical, theoretical and practical perspectives. Laboratories include examination of tissues through the use of loan sets of slides as well as demonstrations and exercises in basic preparation of tissues for microscopic examination. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Fall only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 354 - Special Histology

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233, BIOL 352; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Microscopic recognition and functional correlations of the major vertebrate organ systems. Enrollment is limited to preserve informal and flexible working conditions appropriate to advanced histological work. This course is customized to the participants’ needs. Options include in-depth training in techniques or in-depth analysis of a particular organ system. Two hours lecture, five hours lab. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 358 - Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology (C,M)

    3 cr.


    (Also listed as NEUR 358) (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) 

    Introduces Biology and Neuroscience majors to the cellular and molecular biology of the vertebrate nervous system. Includes ion channel structure and function, synthesis, packaging and release of neurotransmitters, receptor and transduction mechanisms, intracellular signaling, cell-to-cell communication, glial cell function, and neural growth and development.  Three hours lecture.

    Credits cannot be earned for NEUR 358 and BIOL 358.

  
  •  

    BIOL 361 - Molecular Biology I (M,G)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 232; co-requisite: CHEM 233; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Structure and function of prokaryotic cells from a molecular viewpoint. Study of biomacromolecule structure and function; bacterial DNA replication, transcription, translation and how these processes are regulated. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 362 - (W: lab only) Molecular Biology II (M,G)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 361 or CHEM 350; lab is optional) 

    Structure and function of eukaryotic cells and organisms from a molecular viewpoint. Study of eukaryotic genome and gene organization, DNA packaging and replication, RNA transcription and splicing, translation into proteins and how these processes are regulated. Discussion of HIV, cancer, and evolution on the molecular level. Laboratory fulfills a writing-intensive (W) requirement. Three hours lecture, three hours optional lab. Fall only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 364 - Virology (M)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 232-233) 

    A detailed survey of viruses, including nucleic acid replication mechanisms, pathogenicity, and vaccination strategies.  Strong emphasis is placed on the molecular biology of viruses of medical importance. Three hours lecture. Fall only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 370 - (W: lab only) Animal Behavior (P,O)

    4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; lab is optional) 

    Classification of behavior types, development, functional advantages and evolution of behavior, and social and physiological aspects studied in lower and higher organisms. Lab fulfills a writing-intensive (W) requirement. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 371 (W:Lab only) - Ecology (P)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; lab is optional) 

    Study of physical, chemical, and biological factors that influence the distribution and abundance of organisms and determine the relationships among organisms from the population to the ecosystem level. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Lab fulfills a writing-intensive (W) requirement. Fall only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 374 - (W: lab only) Vertebrate Biology (P,O)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; lab is optional) 

    This course presents an overview of the vertebrates, placing vertebrate form and function within an eco logical and evolutionary context. Much of the course is concerned with vertebrate systematics, factors governing distribution, vertebrate inter actions with both biotic and abiotic components of their environment as well as conservation and management issues. Lab fulfills a writing-intensive (W) requirement. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 375 - Evolution (G,P)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) 

    A consideration of the theories of evolution and evidences for them in plants and animals. Population genetics and the adaptiveness of various organic traits will be discussed. Three hours lecture. Fall only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 379 - Biostatistics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: MATH 103) 

    Data analysis and statistical techniques in biology and medicine; probability and frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, and various parametric and nonparametric statistical tests. Use of one or more computerized statistical programs. Three hours lecture. Spring only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 384 - Special Topics in Biology

    2-4 cr.
    Study of selected topics in biology, varying from year to year in accord with student/faculty interest and current research advances.  May include such topics as sensory reception, membrane biology, population genetics, etc.
  
  •  

    BIOL 393 - Undergraduate Research

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisite: 12 credits in Biology) 

    Individual problems for advanced students with sufficient background in biological and physical sciences.

  
  •  

    BIOL 394 - Undergraduate Research

    Variable Credit


    (Prerequisite: 12 credits in Biology) 

    Individual problems for advanced students with sufficient background in biological and physical sciences.

  
  •  

    BIOL 395 - Extreme Physiology

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisites: BIOL 245, 245L)


    This travel course will expose the student, serving as both subject and investigator, to the stunning and diverse environments of Arizona, as she/he assesses cardiovascular and respiratory conditioning and tracks his/her improvement through a 25-day period of extreme environmental and physical challenges. Accompanying instruction will explore the ongoing physiological adaptation.

  
  •  

    BIOL 444 - Sensory Biology (C,O)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 245 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 121/141) 

    The course applies multidisciplinary approaches to the study of senses: physics of stimuli, anatomy of receptor organs, neurophysiology of receptor cells, anatomy and central processing, animal behavior, and artificial sensor design. The course focuses on terrestrial vertebrates with occasional discussions on aquatic sensory systems.  Three hours lecture.

    Credits cannot be earned for BIOL 444 and NEUR 444.

  
  •  

    BIOL 446 - Cardiovascular Physiology (O)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 245, PHYS 120 or 140) 

    The physiological and biophysical bases of cardiovascular function, including cardiac electrophysiology and mechanics; regulation of the heart and the peripheral circulation; hemodynamics; solute and fluid exchange; and cell-cell interactions governing white blood cell transit. Special circulations will highlight the role of cardiovascular regulation in overall physiological function. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    BIOL 450 - Electron Microscopy (C)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Introduction to the mechanics of the electron microscope with emphasis on standard laboratory techniques, including preparation of materials, sectioning, viewing and photographic analysis. One hour lecture, six hours lab.

  
  •  

    BIOL 453 - Skeletal Biology (C)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142 and BIOL 245; Completion or consecutive enrollment in PHYS 120-121 is strongly recommended.) 

    The course provides an interdisciplinary approach to studying form and function of the vertebrate skeletal system. Topics will include anatomical structure, development and growth, adaptation, and disease, and will incorporate the significant influence that genetic and epigenetic factors (including physical forces) have on vertebrate skeletal structure and function.

  
  •  

    BIOL 454 - Pathophysiology (C)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 245) 

    Pathophysiology considers how disease impacts the normal workings of the human body.  This course will consider case studies from all major systems of the body and allow students to investigate the molecular basis for dysfunction.  Pharmacological remedies will be explored providing a mechanism for the return of homeostasis. Three hours lecture. Spring.

  
  •  

    BIOL 472 - Systems Ecology (P)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BIOL 371) 

    The study of ecosystem dynamics and their relationship to the functioning of the biosphere.  A quantitative approach to ecosystem structure and function, emphasizing the use of simulation and conceptual models. The course will involve opportunities to construct and test simulation models. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    BIOL 473 - Estuarine Ecology (O,P)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141 or 101 or permission of instructor; lab is optional) 

    The ecology of marine and estuarine systems, including soil chemistry, halophyte physiology, tidal marsh ontogeny, ecosystem function and the consequences of human alteration of the coastal zone. Lab includes a week-long field trip during Spring Break to Sapelo Island, Georgia, and Cocodrie, Louisiana. Spring, even years. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

  
  •  

    BLDR 351 - Principles of Management

    3 cr.
    This course covers the key aspects of the management process for decision-making. The focus is the organizational setting in which business leadership is exercised.
  
  •  

    BLDR 355 - Business Ethics

    3 cr.
    The individual and social ethics of the major areas of decision-making in business from a leadership perspective.
  
  •  

    BLDR 385 - Self-Assessment Business Leadership Seminar #1

    1 cr.
    Focus is on identifying the characteristics of leadership, self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses, and preparation of plan for self-development.
  
  •  

    BLDR 386 - Empowerment Business Leadership Seminar #2

    1 cr.
    Focus is on identifying the tasks of the leader and “enabling or empowering” people to achieve the organization’s goals.
  
  •  

    BLDR 455 - Policy and Planning

    3 cr.
    This is the capstone course for all business majors. Concepts and skills developed in the functional areas of accounting, finance, management, marketing and production/operations are integrated and applied to the top-level management of an organization. Topics include analyzing organizational environment, setting missions and objectives, developing strategies and plans. allocating resources, and designing organizational structures, reward, and control systems. Special emphasis will be given to the role of executive leadership and values in the articulation of a corporate vision and culture, and in the choice of growth and competitive strategies. Intended as a case- and project-oriented course.
  
  •  

    BLDR 484 - Management by Subjectives: Leadership in Literature

    3 cr.
    This final course approaches the question of leadership from a humanistic perspective. It considers models of literature as they are presented in well-established pieces of literature, including poems, plays and novels, from a range of historical periods. Emphases are on the personal relationships between leaders and those they lead, and on fundamental ethical questions relating to leadership.
  
  •  

    BLDR 485 - Mentorship Business Leadership Seminar #3

    1 cr.
    Student is placed in an organizational setting as a leadership intern to study the leadership of the organization.
  
  •  

    BLDR 486 - Senior Project Business Leadership Seminar #4

    1 cr.
    Student proposes, develops and executes a project evidencing a high degree of leadership skills and activity.
  
  •  

    BUAD 351 - Business Process Overview

    3 cr.
    This is the first course in the area of enterprise management. Students will learn to appreciate the integration of a company’s core business processes. Students will be exposed to the main business processes that drive an organization, the interactions within and between them, and the effect of integration on the decision-making environment. This course uses an enterprise-wide integrated information-systems software and simulated data for a model company.
  
  •  

    BUAD 362 - Business Foundations for Entrepreneurs

    3 cr.


    Prerequisite: MGT 372 (This course is for Non-Business Majors only) 

    The non-business major will learn and apply basic business concepts needed by the entrepreneur.  This will include concepts in financial accounting, managerial accounting, finance, management, and business law.   The student will take this course during the spring semester of the junior year.

  
  •  

    BUAD 363 - Applied Business Foundations for Entrepreneurs

    1 cr.


    Prerequisite: MGT 372, ACC 253 (or equivalent for accounting/finance majors), ACC 254 (or equivalent for accounting/finance majors), MGT 251, MGT 351, and FIN 351 (Concurrent) 

    The business major will apply basic business concepts needed by the entrepreneur.  This will include concepts previously learned in financial accounting, managerial accounting, finance, management, and business law.

  
  •  

    BUAD 470 - Enterprise Information Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BUAD 351) 

    This course is concerned with the management and operations of information systems in an integrated enterprise. It will examine the integrated business processes of an enterprise. Students will analyze and study enterprise systems software in detail. Students will be exposed to the management of the enterprise systems software. They will learn about business integration through the concepts of business engineering and business workflow.

  
  •  

    BUAD 471 - Configuration and Consulting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: BUAD 351) 

    Focus is on the implementation of enterprise systems projects and the role of consultants in such implementation. It examines the integrated business processes of an enterprise, and the concepts of developing data models, business objects, and event-process chains. Students develop implementation plans for enterprise systems software. The course will also discuss the configuration procedures in implementing enterprise systems software. The goal of the course is to prepare the students to become consultants in enterprise systems.

  
  •  

    C/CJ 200 - Forensic Science

    3 cr.
    Designed for law-enforcement majors as well as science majors, this is a study of the rules of evidence and the position of the expert scientific witness in law, followed by a review of the uses of scientific, and particularly chemical, evidence in various phases of the investigation and trial of criminal actions.
  
  •  

    C/IL 102 - Computing and Information Literacy

    3 cr.
    Students learn to use digital technology in the problem-solving process to obtain, evaluate and disseminate information. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab. Students may earn credit for only one C/IL course. Successful completion of C/IL 102/102L (with a grade of C or better) fulfills the computer literacy skills requirement of the University.
  
  •  

    C/IL 102L - Computing and Information Literacy/Lab

    3 cr.
    Students learn to use digital technology in the problem-solving process to obtain, evaluate and disseminate information. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab. Students may earn credit for only one C/IL course. Successful completion of C/IL 102/102L (with a grade of C or better) fulfills the computer literacy skills requirement of the University.
  
  •  

    C/IL 104 - Computing and Informational Literacy for Business

    3 cr.
    A focused variant of C/IL 102-102L with an emphasis appropriate for students with majors in the Kania School of Management.
  
  •  

    CHED 210 - Introduction to Community Health Education

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Community Health Education major or permission of instructor) 

    This course will introduce students to the field of community health education including community health organizations, epidemiology, professionals in the field, overview of the nation’s health, populations, settings and environmental health. Introduce the responsibilities, competencies, and skills of the community health education entry-level professional.

  
  •  

    CHED 310 - Health Education: Theory, Research and Practice

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHED 210) 

    This course is designed to provide students with the underlying context and philosophy of health education practice.  An overview of health education theory and health behavior theory will be emphasized.  Students will explore the use of behavior change theory in practical applications.  A synthesis of health education research will be presented.

  
  •  

    CHED 320 - Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Health Education Programs

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: CHED 310 and CHED major)This course will introduce students to planning models in community health education. Survey methods for assessment, strategies for implementation and approaches for designing program evaluation will be emphasized. Intervention mapping will be utilized during case study analysis.
  
  •  

    CHED 410 - Health Education Communication Methods and Techniques

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHED 320 and senior status) 

    This course will introduce students to health communication including communication strategies, models, and theories to enhance delivery of health education programs in different settings.  A variety of communication methods will be presented.  Students will demonstrate these methods in community settings and in the classroom.

  
  •  

    CHED 480 - Internship in Health Education

    6 cr.


    (Prerequisite: Senior CHED majors only, all core CHED courses completed, Internship Coordinator approval, accumulative GPA of 2.50, First Aid & CPR certification as required by internship site.) 

    The 240-hour supervised internship is designed to provide an opportunity for students to use the concepts, techniques and theories learned in the classroom in professional community health education settings.  Students are assigned tasks that enable them to develop competencies and increase their skills as entry-level health educators.

  
  •  

    CHEM 100 - (E) Elements of Chemistry

    3 cr.
    An elementary study of the field of chemistry for the non-science major; concepts of structure, states of matter, modern developments, implications of the field for modern society. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    CHEM 104 - (E) Science and Society

    3 cr.
    A study of some current problems of a scientific and technological nature from the point of view of the non-science major. Scientific background will be provided to lead to greater understanding and possible solutions. Possible topic: energy, genetic engineering, narcotics, pesticides, etc. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    CHEM 110-111 - (E) Introductory Chemistry

    6 cr.


    (CHEM 110 is a prerequisite for CHEM 111) 

    A study of the fundamental concepts of general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 110L-111L - Introductory Chemistry Laboratory

    2 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or corequisite; CHEM 110L is prerequisite for CHEM 111L) 

    Experiments dealing with principles of general, organic and biological chemistry are performed. Two hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 112 (E) - General and Analytical Chemistry

    3 cr.
    A study of the laws, theories and principles of general chemistry together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each semester.
  
  •  

    CHEM 112-113 - (E) General and Analytical Chemistry

    6 cr.


    (CHEM 112 is a prerequisite for CHEM 113.) 

    A study of the laws, theories and principles of general chemistry together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 112L-113L - General and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 112L is prerequisite for CHEM 113L) 

    Experiments involve semi-micro techniques for qualitative and quantitative analysis (gravimetric and volumetric analysis). Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 113 - (E) General and Analytical Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (CHEM 112 is a prerequisite for CHEM 113.) 

    A study of the laws, theories and principles of general chemistry together with qualitative and quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 114L - General Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    2 cr.
    A special laboratory course for those students who are advanced in chemistry. Semi-micro techniques of gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis. Admission will be on the basis of a placement exam and the professor’s permission.Note: For students with majors in the Chemistry and Biology departments, this course will satisfy the requirements for the CHEM 112-113 laboratory courses.
  
  •  

    CHEM 202 - (E) Global Change

    3 cr.
    Earth system sciences and global environmental change, examining the records of past changes in climate, land-mass distribution, and atmospheric and oceanic composition, evaluating fossils, tree ring data, and geological indicators.
  
  •  

    CHEM 232 - (E) Organic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 112-113; CHEM 232 is a prerequisite for CHEM 233) 

    An introduction to the chemistry of the principal aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their derivatives. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 232L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 113L or 114L is a prerequisite for CHEM 232L; CHEM 232L is prerequisite for CHEM 233L) 

    Investigation of the chemical preparations and syntheses of major organic functional groups. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 233 - (E) Organic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 112-113; CHEM 232 is a prerequisite for CHEM 233) 

    An introduction to the chemistry of the principal aliphatic and aromatic compounds of carbon and their derivatives. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 233L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 232L is prerequisite for CHEM 233L) 

    Investigation of the chemical preparations and syntheses of major organic functional groups. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 240 - Inorganic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 113) 

    Descriptive chemistry of main group and selected transition elements and their compounds correlated with the periodic table, physical properties, atomic and molecular structure.

  
  •  

    CHEM 320 - Industrial Chemistry

    3 cr.
    A review of chemical operations and unit or batch processes common to industry. Econometric analysis involving supply-demand, productivity, commodity prices and costing is an important area covered, as are measures of productivity and patent activity. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    CHEM 330 - Organic Chemistry III

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) 

    A continuation of Chemistry 232-233, emphasizing the study of the major types of organic mechanisms. Two hours lecture.

  
  •  

    CHEM 330L - Organic Chemistry III

    1.5-3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 233L is a prerequisite) 

    Experiments involve advanced techniques in synthesis and characterization of organic compounds.Six hours laboratory for Chemistry majors and three hours laboratory for Biochemistry majors.

  
  •  

    CHEM 340 - Environmental Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) 

    A study of chemicals in the environment including their origin, transport, reactions, and toxicity in soil, water, air and living systems.

  
  •  

    CHEM 342 - Environmental Toxicology

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233, BIOL 141-142) 

    This course will encompass several realms of environmental toxicology, including general toxicological theory, effects of contaminants on various biological systems, and discussion of environmental toxicological issues (i.e., specific case studies as well as the types of analyses used in these types of studies).

  
  •  

    CHEM 344 - Environmental Geochemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) 

    Consideration of natural cycles (carbon, sulfur, oxygen, water, etc.) that govern the chemistry of our planet. The origins of the elements, paleohistory, and composition of the planet. Effects of man’s activities with attention to their effects on the state of the oceans and the atmosphere.

  
  •  

    CHEM 350 - General Biochemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 233) 

    An introduction to the study of biochemistry. A study of the chemical nature of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes, including relationships among vitamins, hormones, and inorganic compounds. Three hours lecture. Successful completion of CHEM 350 precludes credit for CHEM 450.

  
  •  

    CHEM 351 - General Biochemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 350) 

    An introduction to the study of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and proteins, including energy transformations and the role of enzyme systems in the above processes. Three hours lecture. Successful completion of CHEM 351 precludes credit for CHEM 451.

  
  •  

    CHEM 360 - Biophysical Chemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233 and CHEM 232L/233L) 

    An introduction to the application of physical-chemical principles to biological problems. This involves aqueous solutions, colloidal chemistry, thermodynamics, electro-chemistry, chemical kinetics and nuclear chemistry. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    CHEM 360L - Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co requisite; CHEM 360L is prerequisite for CHEM 361L) 

    Experiments involve applications of physical-chemical techniques to biological problems. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 361 - Biophysical Chemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite CHEM 360) 

    A continuation of Biophysical Chemistry I involving a study of atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, photo-chemistry, and surface chemistry with applications to biological and biochemical phenomena. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    CHEM 361L - Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co requisite; CHEM 360L is prerequisite for CHEM 361L) 

    Experiments involve applications of physical-chemical techniques to biological problems. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 362 - Physical Chemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 113, MATH 222) 

    A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter and the dynamics of chemical reactions. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 362L - (W) Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    Lecture is pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 362L is prerequisite for CHEM 363L) 

    Experiments demonstrate physical-chemical properties of matter and reactions. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 363 - Physical Chemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 113, MATH 222) 

    A study of the physical-chemical properties of matter and the dynamics of chemical reactions. Three hours lecture each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 363L - (W) Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.


    (Lecture is pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 362L is prerequisite for CHEM 363L) 

    Experiments demonstrate physical-chemical properties of matter and reactions. Three hours laboratory each semester.

  
  •  

    CHEM 370 - Instrumental Analysis

    2 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 360 or 362) 

    Instrumental methodsof analysis consisting of theory and application of such instrumental techniques as spectroscopy, polarography, and instrumental titrimetry. Two hours lecture.

  
  •  

    CHEM 370L - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) 

    Experiments involve application of modern chemical instrumentation and techniques to quantitative analysis. Six hours laboratory.

  
  •  

    CHEM 384 - Special Topics in Chemistry

    2-4 cr.
    Study of selected topics in chemistry and biochemistry, depending on student and faculty interest and the current state of the science.  It may include topics from inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, polymer chemistry and interdisciplinary topics.
  
  •  

    CHEM 390 - Chemical Literature and Writing

    1 cr.
    A study of the published source material of chemical science and industry.  The course includes practical instruction in library technique and in the written reporting of results. One hour lecture.
  
  •  

    CHEM 391 - Seminar

    1 cr.
    Current topics in chemistry, biochemistry, and industrial chemistry are prepared and presented by the students.
  
  •  

    CHEM 440 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 362-363 or 360-361) 

    Theoretical concepts and their application to the reactions and structure of inorganic compounds.  Coordination chemistry and related topics, physical methods and reaction mechanisms. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    CHEM 440L - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    3 cr.


    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) 

    Laboratory methods involving synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds are developed. Three hours laboratory.

  
  •  

    CHEM 450 - Biochemistry I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CHEM 233) 

    Structure-function relationships with emphasis on the organic and biophysical characteristics of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates are described.  Enzyme mechanisms and kinetics and the thermodynamic basis of intermediary metabolism are major themes. Three hours lecture. CHEM 450L Lab is required of Biochemistry majors. Successful completion of CHEM 450 precludes credit for CHEM 350.

  
  •  

    CHEM 450L - (W) Biochemistry Laboratory

    1.5 cr.
    (Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite)

    Experiments involve techniques used in characterization of biopolymers and study of enzyme kinetics.
  
  •  

    CHEM 451 - Biochemistry II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 450) 

    The discussion of intermediary metabolism is continued from CHEM 450 with emphasis on lipid protein and nucleic acid metabolism.  Chemical aspects of molecular biology, including DNA replication, gene regulation and protein biosynthesis are included. Three hours lecture. Successful completion of CHEM 451 precludes credit for CHEM 351.

  
  •  

    CHEM 452 - Enzymology

    3 cr.
    A course in the chemical nature of enzymes with relation to mechanism of enzyme action and kinetics, purification and identification of enzymes and isoenzymes, biochemical and physiological aspects of enzymes in living systems. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    CHEM 455 - Chemical Toxicology

    3 cr.


    Formerly CHEM 352. (Prerequisite: CHEM 350 or CHEM 450 for the first semester and CHEM 351 or CHEM 451 as prerequisite or co-requisite for the second semester. 

    The nature, mode of action and methods of counteracting substances which have an adverse effect on biological systems, especially human. Medical, industrial and environmental forensic aspects will be discussed. Three hours lecture.

  
  •  

    CHEM 460 - Physical Chemistry III

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: CHEM 363) 

    Quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including classical problems, perturbational theory, variational theory and specific applications of molecular orbital theory to organic molecules and spectroscopic applications.

  
  •  

    CHEM 464 - Polymer Chemistry

    3 cr.


    (Co-requisites: CHEM 330, CHEM 361 or 363) 

    Survey of preparative methods for polymers; characterization of polymers using physico-chemical methods, spectroscopy, and thermal analysis; structure-property relationships; and applications of polymers. Three hours lecture.

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 15