May 29, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2011-2012 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2011-2012 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    ACC 251 - Financial Accounting I

    3 cr.


    (For accounting and finance majors) 

    A survey of accounting principles, concepts and procedures. Topics covered include financial statements, the information-processing cycle, cash, receivables, inventory costing methods, plant and equipment, intangibles, and current liabilities.

  
  •  

    ACC 252 - Financial Accounting II

    3 cr.


    (Continuation of ACC 251 for accounting and finance majors; prerequisite: ACC 251) 

    A study of long-term liabilities, owners’ equity of corporations and partnerships, the cash-flow statement, and cost analysis and accumulation.

  
  •  

    ACC 253 - Financial Accounting

    3 cr.


    (For non-accounting and non-finance majors) 

    A survey of the accounting cycle, basic financial statements, theory and techniques of income, asset, and liability recognition.

  
  •  

    ACC 254 - Managerial Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Continuation of ACC 253 for non-accounting and non-finance majors; prerequisite: ACC 253) 

    This course examines accounting information primarily from the perspective of a user within the organization. Topics covered include cost allocation, product costing, budgeting, profit planning, and performance evaluation.

  
  •  

    ACC 361 - Intermediate Accounting I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: junior standing, ACC 252) 

    A comprehensive study of contemporary accounting theory, concepts and procedures and their application to the asset classifications on the balance sheet. Current pronouncements of the various accounting organizations relevant to assets will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    ACC 362 - Intermediate Accounting II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 361) 

    Application of contemporary accounting theory to liabilities and stockholder’s equity classifications of the balance sheet. Current pronouncements of accounting organizations relevant to liabilities and owners’ equity accounts will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    ACC 363 - Federal Taxes

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 or 254, junior standing) 

    An introductory course covering pertinent phases of federal income taxation. Emphasis on business transactions, preparation of individual returns, and finding the answers to federal tax questions.

  
  •  

    ACC 364 - Auditing Theory

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 361) 

    Regulatory, legal, ethical, and technical issues related to the independent audit service. Examination of auditing standards, statistical methods and techniques involved in the examination of certain transaction cycles.

  
  •  

    ACC 365 - Federal Taxation of Corporations and Partnerships

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 252) 

    An introduction to the taxation of C and S corporations and partnerships, including analysis of the tax consequences of their formation, operation, and liquidation.

  
  •  

    ACC 370 - Fraud Examination

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 252 or 254) 

    This course provides the student with an understanding of the various forms of fraud that take place within and outside of the organization. The student is exposed to the control and investigative techniques essential to the prevention and detection of these frauds.

  
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    ACC 372 - Accounting for Electronic Business

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, junior standing) (Formerly AIS 372) 

    This course will introduce students to the role of accounting in today’s global business environment. Students will examine how technology has impacted the techniques of accounting and reporting. Computerized models of accounting will be used to explore the tools available to compile data for management decision and reporting. Both Internet business and traditional business transactions will be evaluated.(Also listed as EC 372.)

  
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    ACC 373 - Object Oriented Applications in Business and Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, C/IL 104) (Formerly AIS 373) 

    This course is an introduction to the design and analysis of computer systems utilizing an object-oriented approach. Topics include: major methodologies, methods and techniques for analysis and design, concepts and techniques for development projects, CASE tool support development work, and approaches to planning for systems implementation, evaluation, and maintenance.

  
  •  

    ACC 374 - Database Management Systems for Electronic Business

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, EC 251) (Formerly AIS 362) 

    This course deals with the use of database management systems to support electronic business. Topics include: data modeling; database design and normalization; structured query language (SQL); database application development ; integration of Web server and database server; distributed databases; data warehousing; and data mining.(Also listed as EC 362.)

  
  •  

    ACC 375 - Enterprise Accounting and Control

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, junior standing)(Formerly AIS 367) 

    This course examines how accounting principles, methods, and techniques are harnessed to meet the reporting needs of an organization in an integrated management and information technology environment. It is designed to demonstrate the integration of both financial and managerial accounting procedures with the core business processes and organizational elements of an enterprise.

  
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    ACC 460 - Advanced Accounting I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362) 

    The theories and promulgated standards of accounting related to multiple business units, including accounting for business combinations, consolidated financial statements, minority interest, and branch accounting. Also covered is governmental and nonprofit accounting.

  
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    ACC 461 - Cost Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252; junior standing) 

    Theories, techniques and procedures in cost accumulation, reporting and control, including such topics as job-order costs, process costs, by-products and joint-products costing, and standard cost and variance analysis.

  
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    ACC 462 - Advanced Managerial Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 461) 

    Accounting techniques as control devices in business with emphasis on the use of accounting data in business decisions. Topics to include budgeting and profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis and direct costing.

  
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    ACC 463 (W) - Financial Statement Analysis & Research

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362) 

    This course provides the student with the skills necessary to perform thorough financial research to accurately assess an organization’s liquidity, solvency and profitability and valuation positions. In developing an understanding of the various analytical measures that are used for this purpose, significant use is made of real-life companies.

  
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    ACC 465 - Accounting Communications

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 361, ACC 363, ACC 364 and ACC 461 or equivalent) 

    This course is designed to enhance the students’ communication skills as applied to accounting-related situations. Course activities include presentations, written assignments and projects in various areas of accounting such as financial reporting, cost management, business evaluation and assurance services. (Not open to students who have received credit for ACC 465.)

  
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    ACC 470 - Law for Accountants

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: MGT 251) 

    A study of the law of contracts, sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, rights of debtors and creditors, and bankruptcy.

  
  •  

    ACC 471 - Management Auditing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362) 

    An in-depth examination of the accountant in the manager’s position. Includes administrative effectiveness and efficiency as provided through sound internal controls, and design and implementation of monitoring systems within the organization to promote better cost-benefit decisions.

  
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    ACC 472 - Advanced Accounting II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362) 

    A study of the theories and promulgated standards of accounting related to international operations, partnerships, estates and trusts, installment sales, consignments, SEC reporting, and interim financial reporting.

  
  •  

    ACC 473 - Advanced Auditing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 364) 

    An examination of statistical analysis in making audit judgments; internal control and auditing issues relating to EDP systems; risk assessment and testing for certain transaction cycles; and other attestation services and reports.

  
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    ACC 474 - Accounting Information Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 252) 

    The design and application of accounting systems in both the manual and automated environments. Analysis of information’s accumulation and use patterns in organizations with a focus on providing useful and timely information. Extensive computer usage of professional business software.

  
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    ACC 476 - Electronic Business Information Systems Security and Ethics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 474 or OIM 471) (Formerly AIS 381) 

    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the technical, managerial, legal and ethical issues of information security. Topics include: Web server and client security; secure transactions and payments; information security; digital certificates and practices; legal, moral and ethical issues; intellectual property and patents; governmental regulations and policies; and emerging technologies.(Also listed as EC 471.)

  
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    ACC 477 - Advanced Auditing Issues: Information Systems Auditing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 364 and ACC 474) (Formerly AIS 423) 

    The objective of this course is to develop competence in information systems auditing (the audit and control of computer-based information systems) by focusing on the design and implementation of audit approaches in automated settings. Topics include: information systems (IS) audits, IS controls, risk assessment, and computer-assisted audit techniques (CAATS).

  
  •  

    ACC 479 - Business Applications of Communication Networks

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 474) (Formerly AIS 483) 

    Use of computer and telecommunication networks to achieve organizational goals. Topics include data communications; planning and design of communication networks; data integrity, independence and security, client-server computing; global communication; the Internet; applications of telecommunication networks and current issues and future trends.(Also listed as EC 473 and OIM 473.)

  
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    ACC/IB 475 - International Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 or 254, ECO 351) 

    This course is designed for both accounting and non-accounting majors with an interest in global accounting issues. The environmental influences on accounting development, the reporting standards for selected countries, financial statement analysis, and taxation and managerial accounting issues for multinational business entities are examined.

  
  •  

    ARAB 101 - (CF) Beginning Arabic

    3 cr.
    Designed for non–Arabic-speaking students, this course studies modern standard Arabic and aims to enable students to use and properly pronounce simple Arabic words and to listen, speak, read and write simple sentences. This course also offers a preliminary approach to Arabic grammar. (ARAB 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    ARAB 102 - (CF) Beginning Arabic

    3 cr.
    Designed for non–Arabic-speaking students, this course studies modern standard Arabic and aims to enable students to use and properly pronounce simple Arabic words and to listen, speak, read and write simple sentences. This course also offers a preliminary approach to Arabic grammar. (ARAB 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    ARAB 211 - (CF,D) Intermediate Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 101-102 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Completion of ARAB 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements. A continuation of elementary Arabic. Students will acquire more vocabulary and grammar and engage in more speaking, reading and writing. (ARAB 211 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    ARAB 212 - (CF,D) Intermediate Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 101-102 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Completion of ARAB 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements. A continuation of elementary Arabic. Students will acquire more vocabulary and grammar and engage in more speaking, reading and writing. (ARAB 211 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    ARAB 311 - (CF,D) Advanced Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 211-212 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Advanced grammar, reading, conversation and composition in standard Arabic. This third-year course emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in interactive settings. (ARAB 311 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 312.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    ARAB 312 - (CF,D) Advanced Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 211-212 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Advanced grammar, reading, conversation and composition in standard Arabic. This third-year course emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in interactive settings. (ARAB 311 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 312.) Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    ART 112 - Color and Design

    3 cr.
    A foundation course introducing the elements and principles of two- dimensional design. Various materials are used to explore the organization of space and basic color theory.
  
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    ART 114 - Three-Dimensional Design

    3 cr.
    A foundation course investigating basic materials and approaches in the creation of three-dimensional form. Hands-on involvement with diverse media, techniques and tools of the sculptor’s craft is emphasized.
  
  •  

    ART 116 - Basic Drawing

    3 cr.
    A foundation course designed to develop skills in basic drawing and perception. Various media are employed in exercises involving the use of line and shading, shape and space, and design and composition.
  
  •  

    ART 120 - Painting I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ART 112, 116 or equivalent) 

    A first-level painting course concerned with fundamentals such as composition, observation, basic color theory and basic techniques. The class includes one museum trip and regular group critiques.

  
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    ART 182 - Independent Study Course

    3 cr.
    These courses are designed to address the career objectives of students who intend to pursue studies in studio art, or in disciplines for which background in studio art is necessary.Arranged with permission of the director.
  
  •  

    ART 183 - Independent Study Course

    3 cr.
    These courses are designed to address the career objectives of students who intend to pursue studies in studio art, or in disciplines for which background in studio art is necessary.Arranged with permission of the director.
  
  •  

    ART 184 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Selected topics in studio art vary on the basis of student/faculty interest and available resources Topics may include, but are not limited to: Printmaking, Painting II, Advanced Drawing, Pastel and Watercolor.
  
  •  

    ART 322 - Two-Dimensional Computer Animation Techniques

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 202 or CMPS 334 or permission of instructor) 

    A course in the creation of computer animation, with an emphasis on Web-based implementation. This course introduces techniques for computer animation such as key-framing, motion capture, layers, guides, tweening. The techniques will be implemented using the industry-standard software, Flash. The course also includes an overview of story-telling, story-boarding and scene composition. A major project will be required.(Also listed as MIT 322.)

  
  •  

    ART 324 - 3D Computer-generated Animation/Content

    3 cr.
    A course that addresses three-dimensional graphic content creation and manipulation. Students develop 3D content using a number of industry- standard software packages. Topics include mode/texture development, animation, construction of 3D environments, rendering and advanced topics.(Also listed as MIT 324.)
  
  •  

    ARTH 111 - (CA) History of World Art I

    3 cr.
    A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture from prehistoric times through the dawn of the Renaissance in 1400. The art of ancient Eastern and Western civilizations is studied in historical contexts of idea, style and technique.
  
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    ARTH 112 - (CA) History of World Art II

    3 cr.
    The course opens with the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Renaissance, Baroque, and 18th-century Europe. Introduced by Impressionism, Expressionism, and Cubism, the study of the art of the modern world concludes with a survey of idea, style and technique in 20th-century art.(ARTH 111 not a prerequisite.)
  
  •  

    ARTH 113 - (CA,D) Native American Art

    3 cr.
    Students will study the history, society, religious beliefs and craft traditions of the pre-colonial peoples of the United States, as well as contemporary Native American artists. The course entails group work, a collaborative final project, and a trip to the Mashantucket Pequot Museum in Connecticut or to the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.
  
  •  

    ARTH 114 - (CA) History of Architecture

    3 cr.
    A general survey of architectural history from the prehistoric through the modern era, focusing on architectural style, the built environment, and the rituals which condition the use and design of structures and urban spaces. The course features walking tours of Philadelphia and the city of Scranton as well as guest lectures by area architects.
  
  •  

    ARTH 115 - Art of the Ancient World

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 201) 

    A survey of the art and architecture produced between 3000 and 1250 B.C. The course opens in the painted caves of Prehistoric Europe, and continues through the contemporaneous civilizations of the Ancient Near East (Sumer, Babylon, Assyria, Persia) and Egypt.

  
  •  

    ARTH 116 - (CA) Art of Greece and Rome

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 202) 

    The course begins in the Aegean with the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures celebrated by Homer; surveys the art of classical Greece; and continues with the art of the Etruscans in ancient Italy. The course concludes with Roman art and architecture (3rd c. B.C. to 5th c. A.D.).

  
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    ARTH 117 - Early Christian and Byzantine Art

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 203) 

    The art and architecture produced by the first Christians borrowed much from the forms and ideas of Roman art. The course surveys art produced in Rome, Ravenna, Milan, Greece and Constantinople, 200-1400 A.D. Emphasis will be placed on the origin and symbolism of Christian imagery and architecture.

  
  •  

    ARTH 118 - (W) Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 204) 

    A survey of art and architecture in western Europe, 1100-1400. Medieval architecture, manuscripts, paintings, and decorative arts will be presented as mirrors of medieval thought and spirituality.

  
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    ARTH 205 - The Icon in Russian and East European

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on theology, image and artistic style in the making of the icon in Russia and East Europe. The icon will be studied from medieval through modern times.
  
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    ARTH 210 - (CA,D,W) Women in the Visual Arts

    3 cr.
    This cross-disciplinary course presents selected topics on women in the visual arts, including varied ways of thinking and writing about women, art and culture. Topics include a survey of women in art, being female in the Renaissance, contemporary women artists, female artists in Latin America, and 19th-century women artists.
  
  •  

    ARTH 212 - (CA,D,W) African American Art

    3 cr.
    This course considers African Americans in the visual arts, including varied ways of thinking and writing about African American art and culture. Topics include slavery and emancipation, the Harlem renaissance, the Civil Rights movement, African American women artists, and collecting African American art.
  
  •  

    ARTH 213 - (CA,D,W) American Art

    3 cr.
    A survey of American architecture, painting and sculpture from the earliest exploration days. The course will cover art of Native America, the colonial period, the Civil War era and the 20th century.
  
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    ARTH 214 - Renaissance Art in Italy,1200-1480

    3 cr.
    As a survey of the art produced in Italy, 1200-1480, the course examines the production of art as it relates to society and culture. From St. Francis’ Assisi to Pope Sixtus IV’s Rome, and from Giotto to Botticelli, painting, sculpture, and architecture will be studied in contexts of history, gender, technology, intellectual life, theology and philosophy.
  
  •  

    ARTH 215 - Renaissance Art in Italy, 1480-1620

    3 cr.
    This course continues with a survey of art and society in Italy, 1480-1620. The papacy, during the 15th century, brings Michelangelo and Raphael to Rome, which remains a cultural capital for artists through the 17th century. Artists working in 16th century Florence, in the wake of Michelangelo, introduce a style that flourishes brightly, but briefly: Mannerism.
  
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    ARTH 216 - (CA,W) Michelangelo and His World

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 410) 

    This course investigates the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Michelangelo. By considering the artistic traditions to which he fell heir as a Florentine artist, the traditional and the innovative aspects of Michelangelo’s work will be assessed. Readings from his letters and poetry and from 16th-century biographies will furnish a rich context for the appreciation of his work and for understanding the society to which he belonged.

  
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    ARTH 217 - (W) Leonardo Da Vinci

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 411) 

    Artist, scientist, author and free-thinker, Leonardo left few paintings, many drawings, and copious notes attesting the wide range of his intellectual curiosity. This course focuses both on the 15th-century world to which the artist belonged and on his many writings in order to measure Leonardo’s greatness as prodigy and visionary.

  
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    ARTH 218 - (W) The Age of Rembrandt

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 303) 

    A survey of the painting, sculpture, and architecture produced in Europe between 1600 and 1750. The course opens in Bernini’s Rome of the Counter-Reformation and concludes in France at the royal courts of Louis XIV and XV.

  
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    ARTH 219 - The Renaissance in Northern Europe

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 311) 

    Art produced in northern Europe (France, Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands) differs remarkably from the art produced in Italy by Botticelli and Michelangelo. This course surveys painting north of the Alps by such artists as Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hieronymus Bosch, and Albrecht Dürer.

  
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    ARTH 220 - (W,D) History of Photography

    3 cr.
    The course explores the historical development of photography and considers the medium’s aesthetic components as well as the theoretical and representational issues it raises.
  
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    ARTH 221 - (CA,D,W) Nineteenth-Century Art

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 304) 

    An exploration of painting and sculpture from Neoclassicism to Symbolism. Special emphasis will be given to works by J.L. David, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Morisot, Rodin, and Van Gogh. In addition to developing skills of visual analysis, the course will focus on the interaction between artist and society.

  
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    ARTH 222 - (W) Impressionism and Post-Impressionism

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 312) 

    Impressionism, an artistic movement linked today with leisure and pleasure, developed out of conflict and challenged many standard European art practices. The course investigates the artistic goals and strategies of Manet, Monet, Degas, Renoir, Morisot, Cassatt and Pissarro and considers how their works respond to important social issues of the day. Paintings by the Postimpressionists Cézanne, Seurat, Van Gogh and Gauguin will be examined as reactions to the aims of Impressionism.

  
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    ARTH 225 - (CA,D,W) Art of the Twentieth Century

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 305) 

    Beginning with pre- World War I works by Matisse and Picasso, this course surveys the painting, sculpture, architecture and photography of the period known as modernism, ending with an exploration of the contemporary phenomenon of postmodernism. Through examination of both artworks and texts by artists and critics, considerations of style and technique will be integrated with an analysis of historical context.

  
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    ARTH 227 - (CA,D,W) Matisse and Picasso

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 315) 

    This course examines the works of these two influential modern artists by considering the aesthetic and historical context of their paintings, sculptures, prints, and writings on art.

  
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    ARTH 295 - (W,D,CA) Travel Seminar

    1.5 cr.
    Short study trips to provide students with the opportunity to study works of painting, architecture, and sculpture on site. Trips will be designed as themes: the Art Museums of London and Paris, The Bible in Text and Image (Italy), Renaissance Villas and Palaces, Michelangelo, etc.
  
  •  

    ARTH 296 - (W,D,CA) Travel Seminar

    1.5 cr.
    Short study trips to provide students with the opportunity to study works of painting, architecture, and sculpture on site. Trips will be designed as themes: the Art Museums of London and Paris, The Bible in Text and Image (Italy), Renaissance Villas and Palaces, Michelangelo, etc.
  
  •  

    ARTH 311 - (W,D,CA) Medieval and Renaissance Women

    3 cr.
    This topics course explores various ways of looking at Italian medieval and Renaissance women in text and image. Primary texts by Hildegard von Bingen, Giovanni Boccaccio, Christine de Pisan, Leonbattista Alberti and Baldassare Castiglione will be studied for the light they shed on the notion and nature of woman. Great emphasis will be placed on in-class analysis of images, and a field trip to the Italian Renaissance collection of the Metropolitan Museum, NYC, will enable students to apply skills of visual analysis.
  
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    ARTH 316 - Painted Chambers of the Renaissance

    3 cr.
    Renaissance images were made, commissioned and viewed by particular audiences to whom the work of art communicated and reinforced con- temporary beliefs and values. This course explores the meaning and purpose of murals produced for public and private use in private homes, churches and civic structures. Contemporary literature of the period will also be studied.
  
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    ARTH 380 - Museum Methods (Internship)

    1-3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARTH 111, 112 and two additional ARTH courses) 

    Offered in cooperation with the local art venues, this course introduces students to ideologies of arts administration and methods of curatorial research and procedure. On-site study is supervised by Art History faculty.

  
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    ARTH 384 - Special Topics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARTH 111, 112 and two additional ARTH courses) 

    Selected topics will vary from year to year on the basis of student/faculty interest and available media resources. Topics may include Art of the Far East, History of Printmaking, etc. Discrete styles and individual artists may also be the focus of a selected topics course.

  
  •  

    ARTH 484 - Special Topics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARTH 111, 112 and two additional ARTH courses) 

    Selected topics will vary from year to year on the basis of student/faculty interest and available media resources. Topics may include Art of the Far East, History of Printmaking, etc. Discrete styles and individual artists may also be the focus of a selected topics course.

  
  •  

    ASL 101 - (CF) American Sign Language

    3 cr.


    (ASL 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102.) 

    Introduces the fundamentals of ASL, including its history and recognition as a language. Development of expressive and receptive conversational skills. Students will gain insight into deaf culture through the study of ASL in the classroom and by interacting with ASL users. Taught by immersion; voice off.

  
  •  

    ASL 102 - (CF) American Sign Language

    3 cr.


    (ASL 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102.) 

    Introduces the fundamentals of ASL, including its history and recognition as a language. Development of expressive and receptive conversational skills. Students will gain insight into deaf culture through the study of ASL in the classroom and by interacting with ASL users. Taught by immersion; voice off.

  
  •  

    BCMB 290 - Seminar

    1 cr.
    Instruction in seminar format and oral presentation; student presentations on current topics in molecular life sciences, relevant to basic or applied research findings from the primary scientific literature. Required twice. Spring only.
  
  •  

    BCMB 440 - Proteomics

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 361 or 362 and CHEM 451 or permission of instructor) 

    Study of the post-genomic era, including protein identification strategies using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectometry and use of protein databases. The course also covers the ways in which proteomic study continues to impact disease diagnosis, cancer research and drug design.

  
  •  

    BCMB 464 - Molecular Biology of Cancer

    1.5 cr.
    Discussion of biological and molecular features of oncogenesis and clinical cancer with details of specific molecular events of carcinogenesis, metastasis, and cellular transduction with a review of treatment moldalities and prevention protocols for clinically important human cancers.
  
  •  

    BCMB 490 - Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology Capstone

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 362 and CHEM 451) 

    Fundamentals of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology will be used to explore various themes in molecular life science. Students are responsible for researching advanced topics and presenting lecture/discussions or case studies to the class.

  
  •  

    BCMB 493 - Undergraduate Research

    3 cr.
    Individual problems for advanced students with sufficient background (as determined by mentor) in the biological and/or chemical sciences.
  
  •  

    BIOL 100 - (E) Modern Concepts of Human Biology

    3 cr.
    Exploration of the practical impact that modern biological concepts have on our lives. Topics include cell function, genetics, AIDS and other infectious diseases, cancer and end of life issues. Provides a framework for making informed ethical decisions regarding pertinent biological issues. Three hours lecture. Fall only.
  
  •  

    BIOL 101 - (E) Introduction to Biological Science

    3 cr.
    Introduction to fundamental concepts, principles and theories of modern biology. Discussion and application of the scientific method in discovery and learning, discussion of experimental and statistical techniques, examination of the historical and cultural fabric of biological science, and discussion of the impact of biological research and development on modern society. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    BIOL 104 - (E) Anatomy, Physiology and Health

    3 cr.
    A systems approach to understanding the components of the human body and their functions in health and wellness. Provides an introduction to body systems and how they are impacted by genetics, the environment, and personal choices. Topics include structural and functional basis for understanding cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, stress, metabolism and weight management, gastrointestinal disorders, and other health-related topics.
  
  •  

    BIOL 105 - (E) Biodiversity

    3 cr.
    An examination of the variety of animal and plant species, especially in the two most diverse ecosystems: the coral reef and the tropical rain forest. The foundations of biological diversity will be studied: ecology, systematics, evolution and biogeography. Current topics will be discussed, such as deforestation, human population growth, endangered species and global warming. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    BIOL 108 - (E) History of Life on Earth

    3 cr.
    Sequence of appearance of life on earth based on the geological record. Topics include the origin of life on earth, patterns and processes of the fossil record, and an introduction to the diversity of life, past and present. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    BIOL 110-111 - (E) Structure and Function of the Human Body

    8 cr.


    (Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    A general study of the anatomy and physiology of the human organism, emphasizing the body’s various coordinated functions from the cellular level to integrated organ systems.Three hours lecture, two hours lab each semester.

  
  •  

    BIOL 141 - (E) General Biology

    4.5 cr.


    (Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    A comprehensive study of the nature of living organisms, both plant and animal, their structure, function, development and relationships, including the problems of development, heredity and evolution.Three hours lecture, three hours lab each semester.

  
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    BIOL 142 - (E) General Biology

    4.5 cr.


    (Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    A comprehensive study of the nature of living organisms, both plant and animal, their structure, function, development and relationships, including the problems of development, heredity and evolution. Three hours lecture, three hours lab each semester.

  
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    BIOL 195 - (E) Tropical Biology (O,P)

    3 cr.
    Study of tropical communities with emphasis on the coral reef. Introduction to a variety of other tropical areas, such as sandy beaches, turtle grass beds, mangrove swamps, tide pools, rocky shores, and rain forests. Approximately two weeks will be spent at a biological station in the American tropics. Swimming proficiency required. Intersession only.
  
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    BIOL 202 - (E) The ABC’s of Genetics

    3 cr.
    Heredity for the non-science major, with emphasis on the human. Provides the background necessary for the non-scientist to understand his/her own hereditary background and to have informed opinions about societal issues related to genetics. Includes Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics, evolution, genetic diseases, genetic engineering, etc. Three hours lecture.
  
  •  

    BIOL 204 - (E,D) Environmental Issues in Latin America

    3 cr.
    Survey of the biogeography and biomes of Latin America, the current challenges to these environments, and programs aimed at achieving sustainability in the region.
  
  •  

    BIOL 205 - (E) Human Sexuality and Reproduction

    3 cr.
    A study of the biology and evolution of sexual function, reproduction and behavior in humans; including discussion of reproductive health issues, historical and social aspects, and consequences for human population growth.
  
  •  

    BIOL 210 - Introductory Medical Microbiology

    3 cr.


    (Pre- or co-requisites: BIOL 110-111, CHEM 110-111; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Fundamentals of microbiology, including structure, function, identification, pathogenesis, epidemiology and control of microorganisms with emphasis on human pathogens. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Fall only.

  
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    BIOL 241 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (O)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Study of the structure and phylogeny of vertebrates and vertebrate organ-systems, emphasizing and comparing vertebrate structure in relation to function. Amphioxus, sea lamprey, shark, perch, Necturus, snake, pigeon and cat are subjected to detailed laboratory study. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Fall only.

  
  •  

    BIOL 245 - (W: lab only) General Physiology (O)

    4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIO 110-111 or BIOL 141-142 and CHEM 112-113; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Physiological processes underlying functioning of the animal organism. Study of irritability, excitation, conduction, contractility, cellular physiology, and functions of mammalian organ-systems. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

  
  •  

    BIOL 250 - Microbiology (C,O,M)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 112-113; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Structure, function, growth, reproduction, heredity and relationships of bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses; a brief survey of pathogens, life cycles of parasitic microzoa; introduction to disease and immunology. Three hours lecture, four hours lab; not open to Nursing majors.

  
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    BIOL 255 - Animal Nutrition and Metabolism (C,O)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, concurrent enrollment in CHEM 233, if not already successfully completed) 

    A survey of concepts and disciplines within the nutritional sciences. Lectures and discussion address basic sciences, biological factors, and current controversies including physiological systems directly and indirectly influencing nutrition and metabolism, nutrients and their metabolism, energy balance, food technology, and agribusiness. Spring semester.

  
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    BIOL 260 - Genetics (G)

    4.5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; lab is optional) 

    Mendelian, cyto-, population and evolutionary, and basic molecular genetics; emphasis on eucaryotes. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

  
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    BIOL 272 - Invertebrate Biology (O,P)

    5 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and lab) 

    Structure and function of the major groups of invertebrates with emphasis on their evolutionary relationships. Labs focus on the diversity of invertebrate forms and include field trips. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Fall, odd years.

  
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    BIOL 273 - Marine Ecology (P)

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) 

    Diversity of marine habitats and of the organisms that inhabit them. Lectures and discussion address the physical and biological factors that influence the distribution and ecology of organisms in the various marine environments, including intertidal, estuarine, benthic, coral reef, and open ocean communities. The effects of humans on the sea will be assessed. Three hours lecture.

 

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