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Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014
University of Scranton
   
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ARTH 111X - (W,CA) Art, Time and Place

    3 cr.
    Art, Time and Place explores public, private and sacred spaces, and the art and architecture that identifies and defines these spaces.  In this course, students will study, through art, how past history informs life both in Scranton and on campus.  A field trip to New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art is included.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: BUAD 101X - (S) Ideas of Business

    3 cr.
    This course is designed to introduce first-year students to life at a Jesuit University and prepare them for an academic study of the interdisciplinary nature of business.  Topic coverage will focus on issues and strategies faced in today’s business environment, transitional issues when beginning college, and the Ignatian Identity.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENLT 130X - (CL) Imagining College

    3 cr.
    In this class, we’ll explore your expectations of college by looking at some of the literature, reporting, films and music that imagine college life.  Along with reading and writing about those texts, you will write personal essays exploring your preconceptions, immediate responses, and eventual reflections on your own college experience.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENLT 131X - (CL) Living Magnificently

    3 cr.
    Examination of the uses of various literary genres-including fiction, autobiography, poetry, and biography-to raise questions about how we might live a good life, even a magnificent one.  Drawing largely from the Spiritual Exercises and Autobiography of Ignatius Loyola, we will explore some of the ways that literature raises questions of vocation, discernment, identification, compassion.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENLT 132X - (CL) Dystopian Visions

    3 cr.
    Students will be introduced to the college-level study of fictional narratives by reading and viewing a group of novels and films that fall generally into the category of recent and contemporary dystopian science fiction.  Discussions and writing assignments will emphasize critical reading skills and forensic argument.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENLT 135X - (CL,D) Feminism and Jesuit Education

    3 cr.
    This course introduces first-year students to the histories and practices of feminism and Jesuit education.  In learning about what drives each approach, the student discovers the points where feminism and Jesuit education intersect: 1) transformational education geared at social justice, 2) the embrace of diversity, and 3) common teaching practices.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENLT 141X - (CL) Introduction to Irish Culture

    3 cr.
    This seminar will explore Irish culture by means of the island’s major works of mythology, history, religion, art, folk story, fairy tale, music, song, verse, drama, fiction, and film (all readings in English).  Participants will, read, discuss, teach, argue, research and explore the rich literature of Ireland.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENLT 142X - (CL,E) Latest & Greatest: Prize Winning Fiction, Poetry and Theatre

    3 cr.
    Award-winning literary texts and writers of the last ten years enable students to examine success in literary and academic contexts and to practice a successful transition to the University of Scranton.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: ENTR 100X - Entrepreneurship

    3 cr.
    This course provides opportunities to develop entrepreneurial skills needed to excel in a rapidly changing world.  Entrepreneurial concepts are examined within the context of Ignatian and Catholic identity.  Special emphasis will be placed on student transition into college life.  This seminar is designed for all students, not just business students.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: HIST 110X - The Jesuits and American History to 1877

    3 cr.
    This first-year seminar explores the history of the United States from the colonial era to 1877, with a special focus on the place of the Jesuits in the history of North America.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: INTD 100X - (E,S) Energy and Society

    3 cr.
    This course addresses how energy is produced and used for society and the impact this production and usage has on society.  The basic science of energy will be covered.  Guest speakers will guide the students through discussions of the various complex human issues involved.  Various elements of the course will introduce the student to the academic life, foster relationships with the faculty, using library resources, developing skills at completing projects and working in groups.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: INTD 119X - (CL) Making Meaning of 9/11

    3 cr.
    Students will explore the ways in which we have come to understand the terrorist attacks of September 11, as well as the ways those attacks have shaped how we understand ourselves and our world.  We will analyze the ways 9/11 has been and continues to be represented through multiple media and genres, e.g. architecture, commemoration, art, non-fiction, fiction, film, governmental discourse, journalism, poetry, and theatre.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: INTD 120X - (E) Science and the Society

    3 cr.
    A science course for non-science majors that introduces students to the scientific method through an analysis of the roles played by Jesuits, and others, in development of various scientific disciplines.  This seminar emphasizes the application of a scientific approach in the problem solving process.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: INTD 122X - Ignatian Citizenship and Contemporary American Politics

    3 cr.
    This seminar explores Ignatian humanism as a pathway for understanding citizenship in contemporary American society.  It examines ancient texts as influences on Renaissance humanism and, thus, Ignatian humanism and its appreciation of civic responsibility.  The concept of citizenship in American Political Science and American politics is examined using that lens.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PCPS 122X - Foundations of Professional Integrity

    3 cr.
    This course is designed to introduce first-year students to life at a Jesuit University and prepare them for academic study within professional careers.  Course topics will expose students to workplace ethics and professional integrity.  Students will develop an understanding of transitional issues and the Jesuit identity.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 121X - Faith and Reason

    3 cr.


    This seminar will focus on reflection and the processes by which one obtains, evaluates, and forms beliefs about themselves, others, and the world around them.  Faith and reason will serve as two distinct, yet closely intertwined, methods of such belief-formation without playing into the overly-simplistic dichotomy religion=faith and science=reason.

    Students who have taken PHIL 121X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 122X - In Search of Wonder

    3 cr.


    An introduction to philosophy via a look at key exemplars or archetypes of doing this kind of critical reflection through the centuries.  Students will do take-home exams that involve applying their knowledge of each thinker to concrete contemporary situations.  The aim is wonder, not memorization.

    Students who have taken PHIL 122X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 123X - Intro to Philosophy: Pursuit of Happiness

    3 cr.


    This course introduces the student to philosophy through the study of “happiness” and the ways in which the “pursuit of happiness” defines human beings.  The course includes discussion of the relation between pleasure and happiness, friendship and happiness, education and self-development.  Uses classical philosophical texts from both Asia and the West to explore the ways in which we might maximize our happiness.

    Students who have taken PHIL 123X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 124X - Preparing for Democratic Citizenship

    3 cr.


    Although a robust economy and a strong government are necessary components of a democratic society, the lifeblood of democracy is an informed and engaged citizenry.  This course explores the role citizens play in making democracy work and seeks to guide students in their development as informed and engaged citizens.

    Students that have taken PHIL 124X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 125X - Thinking the City

    3 cr.


    This course provides an introduction to philosophy by thinking about cities, citizenship, urban planning, and city life.  The “city” provides an opportunity to understand philosophy’s historical roots as well as its contemporary relevance as we reflect on our experiences in Scranton and in our hometowns.

    Students who have taken PHIL 125X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 127X - Wellness and Food: An Introduction to Philosophy

    3 cr.


    We will cover four of the classical areas of Philosophy (viz., Metaphysics, Epistemology, Aesthetics, Ethics) exploring the interrelated themes of wellness and food understood as contributing to a foundational understanding of Ignatian ideals in our lives.  We will use both classical and contemporary writers.

    Student who have taken PHIL 127X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 128X - Wellness, Wholeness and Care for the Self

    3 cr.


    This Freshman Seminar has been designed, at the Dean’s request, for students in the Wellness program.  Its theme is the health that applies to life as a whole and has an active meaning.  Health is a wellness that we do, a caring for self that includes other selves.

    Student who have taken PHIL 128X are not eligible to take PHIL 120.

  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: PHIL 130X - (P) Truth in Being

    3 cr.
    This course is an introduction to philosophy through the study of classical texts from ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary philosophy.  It follows pursuit of truth about questions of being including the existence and nature of Self, God and World.
  
  •  

    1st Yr. Seminar: T/RS 121X - The Bible: Sacred Story and Meaning

    3 cr.
    A survey of central texts and themes of the Bible.  Focus will be on the development of biblical literacy and skills necessary to interpret biblical texts in their historical and theological context.  Connections between biblical texts and the University’s Ignatian mission will be accented.
  
  •  

    ACC 251 - Financial Accounting I

    3 cr.


    (For accounting and finance majors) 

    A survey of accounting principles, concepts and procedures. Topics covered include financial statements, the information-processing cycle, cash, receivables, inventory costing methods, plant and equipment, intangibles, and current liabilities.

  
  •  

    ACC 252 - Financial Accounting II

    3 cr.


    (Continuation of ACC 251 for Accounting and Finance majors; Prerequisite: ACC 251 )

    A study of long-term liabilities, owners’ equity of corporations and partnerships, the cash-flow statement, and cost analysis and accumulation.

  
  •  

    ACC 253 - Financial Accounting

    3 cr.


    (For non-accounting and non-finance majors) 

    A survey of the accounting cycle, basic financial statements, theory and techniques of income, asset, and liability recognition.

  
  •  

    ACC 254 - Managerial Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Continuation of ACC 253 for non-accounting and non-finance majors; Prerequisite: ACC 253 )

    This course examines accounting information primarily from the perspective of a user within the organization. Topics covered include cost allocation, product costing, budgeting, profit planning, and performance evaluation.

  
  •  

    ACC 361 - Intermediate Accounting I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: junior standing, ACC 252 )

    A comprehensive study of contemporary accounting theory, concepts and procedures and their application to the asset classifications on the balance sheet. Current pronouncements of the various accounting organizations relevant to assets will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    ACC 362 - Intermediate Accounting II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 361 )

    Application of contemporary accounting theory to liabilities and stockholder’s equity classifications of the balance sheet. Current pronouncements of accounting organizations relevant to liabilities and owners’ equity accounts will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    ACC 363 - Federal Taxes

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252  or ACC 254 , junior standing)

    An introductory course covering pertinent phases of federal income taxation. Emphasis on business transactions, preparation of individual returns, and finding the answers to federal tax questions.

  
  •  

    ACC 364 - Auditing Theory

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 361 )

    Regulatory, legal, ethical, and technical issues related to the independent audit service. Examination of auditing standards, statistical methods and techniques involved in the examination of certain transaction cycles.

  
  •  

    ACC 365 - Federal Taxation of Corporations and Partnerships

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 252 )

    An introduction to the taxation of C and S corporations and partnerships, including analysis of the tax consequences of their formation, operation, and liquidation.

  
  •  

    ACC 370 - Fraud Examination

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 252  or ACC 254 )
     

    This course provides the student with an understanding of the various forms of fraud that take place within and outside of the organization. The student is exposed to the control and investigative techniques essential to the prevention and detection of these frauds.

  
  •  

    ACC 372 - Accounting for Electronic Business

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 372)  (Prerequisites: ACC 252  or ACC 254 , junior standing)

    This course will introduce students to the role of accounting in today’s global business environment. Students will examine how technology has impacted the techniques of accounting and reporting. Computerized models of accounting will be used to explore the tools available to compile data for management decision and reporting. Both Internet business and traditional business transactions will be evaluated.  (Credits cannot be earned for ACC 372 and EC 372 )

  
  •  

    ACC 373 - Object Oriented Applications in Business and Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 373)  (Prerequisites: ACC 252  orACC 254 , C/IL 104 )

    This course is an introduction to the design and analysis of computer systems utilizing an object-oriented approach. Topics include: major methodologies, methods and techniques for analysis and design, concepts and techniques for development projects, CASE tool support development work, and approaches to planning for systems implementation, evaluation, and maintenance.

  
  •  

    ACC 374 - Database Management Systems for Electronic Business

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 362)  (Prerequisites: ACC 252  or ACC 254 , EC 251 )

    This course deals with the use of database management systems to support electronic business. Topics include: data modeling; database design and normalization; structured query language (SQL); database application development ; integration of Web server and database server; distributed databases; data warehousing; and data mining.  (Credit cannot be earned for ACC 374 and EC 362 )

  
  •  

    ACC 375 - Enterprise Accounting and Control

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 367)  (Prerequisites: ACC 252  or ACC 254 , junior standing)

    This course examines how accounting principles, methods, and techniques are harnessed to meet the reporting needs of an organization in an integrated management and information technology environment. It is designed to demonstrate the integration of both financial and managerial accounting procedures with the core business processes and organizational elements of an enterprise.

  
  •  

    ACC 460 - Advanced Accounting I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362 )

    The theories and promulgated standards of accounting related to multiple business units, including accounting for business combinations, consolidated financial statements, minority interest, and branch accounting. Also covered is governmental and nonprofit accounting.

  
  •  

    ACC 461 - Cost Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252 ; junior standing)

    Theories, techniques and procedures in cost accumulation, reporting and control, including such topics as job-order costs, process costs, by-products and joint-products costing, and standard cost and variance analysis.

  
  •  

    ACC 462 - Advanced Managerial Accounting

    3 cr.


     (Prerequisite: ACC 461 )

    Accounting techniques as control devices in business with emphasis on the use of accounting data in business decisions. Topics to include budgeting and profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis and direct costing.

  
  •  

    ACC 463 - (W) Financial Statement Analysis & Research

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite:ACC 362 )

    This course provides the student with the skills necessary to perform thorough financial research to accurately assess an organization’s liquidity, solvency and profitability and valuation positions. In developing an understanding of the various analytical measures that are used for this purpose, significant use is made of real-life companies.

  
  •  

    ACC 465 - Accounting Communications

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 361 , ACC 363 , ACC 364  and ACC 461  or equivalent)

    This course is designed to enhance the students’ communication skills as applied to accounting-related situations. Course activities include presentations, written assignments and projects in various areas of accounting such as financial reporting, cost management, business evaluation and assurance services.

  
  •  

    ACC 470 - Law for Accountants

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: MGT 251 )

    A study of the law of contracts, sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, rights of debtors and creditors, and bankruptcy.

  
  •  

    ACC 471 - Management Auditing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362 )

    An in-depth examination of the accountant in the manager’s position. Includes administrative effectiveness and efficiency as provided through sound internal controls, and design and implementation of monitoring systems within the organization to promote better cost-benefit decisions.

  
  •  

    ACC 472 - Advanced Accounting II

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 362 )

    A study of the theories and promulgated standards of accounting related to international operations, partnerships, estates and trusts, installment sales, consignments, SEC reporting, and interim financial reporting.

  
  •  

    ACC 473 - Advanced Auditing

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 364 )

    An examination of statistical analysis in making audit judgments; internal control and auditing issues relating to EDP systems; risk assessment and testing for certain transaction cycles; and other attestation services and reports.

  
  •  

    ACC 474 - Accounting Information Systems

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ACC 252 )

    The design and application of accounting systems in both the manual and automated environments. Analysis of information’s accumulation and use patterns in organizations with a focus on providing useful and timely information. Extensive computer usage of professional business software.

  
  •  

    ACC 476 - Electronic Business Information Systems Security and Ethics

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 381)  (Prerequisite: ACC 474  or OIM 471 )

    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the technical, managerial, legal and ethical issues of information security. Topics include: Web server and client security; secure transactions and payments; information security; digital certificates and practices; legal, moral and ethical issues; intellectual property and patents; governmental regulations and policies; and emerging technologies.  (Credits cannot be earned for ACC 476 and EC 471 )

  
  •  

    ACC 477 - Advanced Auditing Issues: Information Systems Auditing

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 423)  (Prerequisites: ACC 364  and ACC 474 )

    The objective of this course is to develop competence in information systems auditing (the audit and control of computer-based information systems) by focusing on the design and implementation of audit approaches in automated settings. Topics include: information systems (IS) audits, IS controls, risk assessment, and computer-assisted audit techniques (CAATS).

  
  •  

    ACC 479 - Business Applications of Communication Networks

    3 cr.


    (Formerly AIS 483)  (Prerequisite: ACC 474 )

    Use of computer and telecommunication networks to achieve organizational goals. Topics include data communications; planning and design of communication networks; data integrity, independence and security, client-server computing; global communication; the Internet; applications of telecommunication networks and current issues and future trends.  (Credit cannot be earned for ACC 479 and EC 473  and OIM 473 )

  
  •  

    ACC/IB 475 - International Accounting

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ACC 252  or ACC 254 , ECO/IB 351 )

    This course is designed for both accounting and non-accounting majors with an interest in global accounting issues. The environmental influences on accounting development, the reporting standards for selected countries, financial statement analysis, and taxation and managerial accounting issues for multinational business entities are examined.

  
  •  

    ARAB 101 - (CF) Beginning Arabic

    3 cr.
    Designed for non–Arabic-speaking students, this course studies modern standard Arabic and aims to enable students to use and properly pronounce simple Arabic words and to listen, speak, read and write simple sentences. This course also offers a preliminary approach to Arabic grammar.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    ARAB 102 - (CF) Beginning Arabic

    3 cr.
    (Prerequisite: ARAB 101 is normally the prerequisite to 102)

    Designed for non–Arabic-speaking students, this course studies modern standard Arabic and aims to enable students to use and properly pronounce simple Arabic words and to listen, speak, read and write simple sentences. This course also offers a preliminary approach to Arabic grammar.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.
  
  •  

    ARAB 211 - (CF,D) Intermediate Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 101-102 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    A continuation of elementary Arabic. Students will acquire more vocabulary and grammar and engage in more speaking, reading and writing.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  Completion of ARAB 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.

  
  •  

    ARAB 212 - (CF,D) Intermediate Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 101-102 or equivalent, as determined by instructor; ARAB 211 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 212) 

    A continuation of elementary Arabic. Students will acquire more vocabulary and grammar and engage in more speaking, reading and writing.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.  Completion of ARAB 212 satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity requirements.

  
  •  

    ARAB 311 - (CF,D) Advanced Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 211-212 or equivalent, as determined by instructor) 

    Advanced grammar, reading, conversation and composition in standard Arabic. This third-year course emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in interactive settings.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    ARAB 312 - (CF,D) Advanced Arabic

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: ARAB 211-212 or equivalent, as determined by instructor; ARAB 311 or its equivalent is normally the prerequisite to 312) 

    Advanced grammar, reading, conversation and composition in standard Arabic. This third-year course emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in interactive settings.  Includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center (language lab) resources.

  
  •  

    ART 110 - Introduction to Art

    3 cr.
    This foundations course (in lecture, studio and ANGEL format) offers students humanities and writing credits combined with basic hands-on experience in the visual arts.  Students will analyze “ways of seeing” by analyzing Egyptian, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Impressionist, Cubist, Surrealist and Neoexpressionist art; and, with concepts and techniques learned, produce art.
  
  •  

    ART 112 - Color and Design

    3 cr.
    A foundation course introducing the elements and principles of two- dimensional design. Various materials are used to explore the organization of space and basic color theory.
  
  •  

    ART 114 - Three-Dimensional Design

    3 cr.
    A foundation course investigating basic materials and approaches in the creation of three-dimensional form. Hands-on involvement with diverse media, techniques and tools of the sculptor’s craft is emphasized.
  
  •  

    ART 116 - Basic Drawing

    3 cr.
    A foundation course designed to develop skills in basic drawing and perception. Various media are employed in exercises involving the use of line and shading, shape and space, and design and composition.
  
  •  

    ART 120 - Painting I

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisite: ART 112 , ART 116  or equivalent)
     

    A first-level painting course concerned with fundamentals such as composition, observation, basic color theory and basic techniques. The class includes one museum trip and regular group critiques.

  
  •  

    ART 182 - Independent Study Course

    3 cr.
    These courses are designed to address the career objectives of students who intend to pursue studies in studio art, or in disciplines for which background in studio art is necessary.Arranged with permission of the director.
  
  •  

    ART 183 - Independent Study Course

    3 cr.
    These courses are designed to address the career objectives of students who intend to pursue studies in studio art, or in disciplines for which background in studio art is necessary.  Arranged with permission of the director.
  
  •  

    ART 184 - Special Topics

    3 cr.
    Selected topics in studio art vary on the basis of student/faculty interest and available resources Topics may include, but are not limited to: Printmaking, Painting II, Advanced Drawing, Pastel and Watercolor.
  
  •  

    ART 322 - Two-Dimensional Computer Animation Techniques

    3 cr.


    (Prerequisites: CMPS 202  or permission of instructor)

    A course in the creation of computer animation, with an emphasis on Web-based implementation. This course introduces techniques for computer animation such as key-framing, motion capture, layers, guides, tweening. The techniques will be implemented using the industry-standard software, Flash. The course also includes an overview of story-telling, story-boarding and scene composition. A major project will be required. (Credit cannot be earned for ART 322 and MIT 322 )

  
  •  

    ART 324 - 3D Computer-generated Animation/Content

    3 cr.
    A course that addresses three-dimensional graphic content creation and manipulation. Students develop 3D content using a number of industry- standard software packages. Topics include mode/texture development, animation, construction of 3D environments, rendering and advanced topics.  (Credit cannot be earned for ART 324 and MIT 324 .)
  
  •  

    ARTH 101 - (CA) History of Art I: The Ancient World

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 110)

    A survey of the art and architecture of prehistoric Europe through Ancient Rome, 30,000 BC to 400 AD.  Art of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome is studied in historical contexts of idea, style, and technique.  A class field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (or other relevant museum) is required.

  
  •  

    ARTH 102 - (CA) History of World Art II: Forming a Christian Heritage

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 112)

    A survey of the art and architecture of early Christianity through the Reformation, 4th - 17th centuries.  Art of early Christianity, the Byzantine Empire, Romanesque and Gothic Europe, the Renaissance and Counter Reformation Europe will be studied in historical contexts of idea, style and technique.  A class field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (or relevant museum) is required.

  
  •  

    ARTH 103 - (CA) History of Art III: Global Visual Cultures

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 112)

    A survey of the art and architecture of the 18th through 21st century.  Within contexts of idea, style and technique, art of Neoclassicism/Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism will be studied, followed by analysis of great movements of the twentieth-century:  Expressionism, Cubism, Neo-Realism, Abstraction, etc.  The course concludes with contemporary art of the 21st century.  A class field trip to the Metropolitan Museum or Guggenheim Museum is required.

  
  •  

    ARTH 108 - Asian Art and Cultures

    3 cr.
    Introducing the art of India, Japan and China (10,000 BC - 1700 AD), this course studies art in contexts of religion, politics, gender, literature and history.  Hands-on learning of Chinese brush painting, Japanese woodblock printing, and 16th century Indian miniature painting and a field trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art are included.
  
  •  

    ARTH 113 - (CA) Native American Art

    3 cr.
    Students will study the history, society, religious beliefs and craft traditions of the pre-colonial peoples of the United States, as well as contemporary Native American artists. The course entails group work, a collaborative final project, and a trip to the Mashantucket Pequot Museum in Connecticut or to the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.
  
  •  

    ARTH 114 - (CA) History of Architecture

    3 cr.
    A general survey of architectural history from the prehistoric through the modern era, focusing on architectural style, the built environment, and the rituals which condition the use and design of structures and urban spaces. The course features walking tours of Philadelphia and the city of Scranton as well as guest lectures by area architects.
  
  •  

    ARTH 115 - Art of the Ancient World

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 201) 

    A survey of the art and architecture produced between 3000 and 1250 B.C. The course opens in the painted caves of Prehistoric Europe, and continues through the contemporaneous civilizations of the Ancient Near East (Sumer, Babylon, Assyria, Persia) and Egypt.

  
  •  

    ARTH 116 - (CA) Art of Greece and Rome

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 202) 

    The course begins in the Aegean with the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures celebrated by Homer; surveys the art of classical Greece; and continues with the art of the Etruscans in ancient Italy. The course concludes with Roman art and architecture (3rd c. B.C. to 5th c. A.D.).

  
  •  

    ARTH 117 - Early Christian and Byzantine Art

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 203) 

    The art and architecture produced by the first Christians borrowed much from the forms and ideas of Roman art. The course surveys art produced in Rome, Ravenna, Milan, Greece and Constantinople, 200-1400 A.D. Emphasis will be placed on the origin and symbolism of Christian imagery and architecture.

  
  •  

    ARTH 118 - (W) Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 204) 

    A survey of art and architecture in western Europe, 1100-1400. Medieval architecture, manuscripts, paintings, and decorative arts will be presented as mirrors of medieval thought and spirituality.

  
  •  

    ARTH 119 - (D) African Cultures and Civilizations

    3 cr.
    The course focuses on African civilizations and cultures through African cultural productions: myths, literature, music, dance and cinema.
  
  •  

    ARTH 205 - The Icon in Russian and East European

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on theology, image and artistic style in the making of the icon in Russia and East Europe. The icon will be studied from medieval through modern times.
  
  •  

    ARTH 210 - (CA,D,W) Women in the Visual Arts

    3 cr.
    This cross-disciplinary course presents selected topics on women in the visual arts, including varied ways of thinking and writing about women, art and culture. Topics include a survey of women in art, being female in the Renaissance, contemporary women artists, female artists in Latin America, and 19th-century women artists.
  
  •  

    ARTH 211 - (D) African Art and Aesthetics

    3 cr.
    This course focuses on African art and theory (beauty, functionality, aesthetics).  In studying artifacts produced on the African continent, students will question and identify criteria for determining objects as “art.”  African artistic influences on Western Art will be explored through a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  
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    ARTH 212 - (CA,D,W) African American Art

    3 cr.
    This course considers African Americans in the visual arts, including varied ways of thinking and writing about African American art and culture. Topics include slavery and emancipation, the Harlem renaissance, the Civil Rights movement, African American women artists, and collecting African American art.
  
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    ARTH 213 - (CA,D,W) American Art

    3 cr.
    A survey of American architecture, painting and sculpture from the earliest exploration days. The course will cover art of Native America, the colonial period, the Civil War era and the 20th century.
  
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    ARTH 214 - Renaissance Art in Italy,1200-1480

    3 cr.
    As a survey of the art produced in Italy, 1200-1480, the course examines the production of art as it relates to society and culture. From St. Francis’ Assisi to Pope Sixtus IV’s Rome, and from Giotto to Botticelli, painting, sculpture, and architecture will be studied in contexts of history, gender, technology, intellectual life, theology and philosophy.
  
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    ARTH 215 - Renaissance Art in Italy, 1480-1620

    3 cr.
    This course continues with a survey of art and society in Italy, 1480-1620. The papacy, during the 15th century, brings Michelangelo and Raphael to Rome, which remains a cultural capital for artists through the 17th century. Artists working in 16th century Florence, in the wake of Michelangelo, introduce a style that flourishes brightly, but briefly: Mannerism.
  
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    ARTH 216 - (CA,W) Michelangelo and His World

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 410) 

    This course investigates the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Michelangelo. By considering the artistic traditions to which he fell heir as a Florentine artist, the traditional and the innovative aspects of Michelangelo’s work will be assessed. Readings from his letters and poetry and from 16th-century biographies will furnish a rich context for the appreciation of his work and for understanding the society to which he belonged.

  
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    ARTH 217 - (W) Leonardo Da Vinci

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 411) 

    Artist, scientist, author and free-thinker, Leonardo left few paintings, many drawings, and copious notes attesting the wide range of his intellectual curiosity. This course focuses both on the 15th-century world to which the artist belonged and on his many writings in order to measure Leonardo’s greatness as prodigy and visionary.

  
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    ARTH 218 - (W) The Age of Rembrandt

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 303) 

    A survey of the painting, sculpture, and architecture produced in Europe between 1600 and 1750. The course opens in Bernini’s Rome of the Counter-Reformation and concludes in France at the royal courts of Louis XIV and XV.

  
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    ARTH 219 - The Renaissance in Northern Europe

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 311) 

    Art produced in northern Europe (France, Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands) differs remarkably from the art produced in Italy by Botticelli and Michelangelo. This course surveys painting north of the Alps by such artists as Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hieronymus Bosch, and Albrecht Dürer.

  
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    ARTH 220 - (W,D) History of Photography

    3 cr.
    The course explores the historical development of photography and considers the medium’s aesthetic components as well as the theoretical and representational issues it raises.
  
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    ARTH 221 - (CA,D,W) Nineteenth-Century Art

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 304) 

    An exploration of painting and sculpture from Neoclassicism to Symbolism. Special emphasis will be given to works by J.L. David, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Morisot, Rodin, and Van Gogh. In addition to developing skills of visual analysis, the course will focus on the interaction between artist and society.

  
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    ARTH 222 - (W) Impressionism and Post-Impressionism

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 312) 

    Impressionism, an artistic movement linked today with leisure and pleasure, developed out of conflict and challenged many standard European art practices. The course investigates the artistic goals and strategies of Manet, Monet, Degas, Renoir, Morisot, Cassatt and Pissarro and considers how their works respond to important social issues of the day. Paintings by the Postimpressionists Cézanne, Seurat, Van Gogh and Gauguin will be examined as reactions to the aims of Impressionism.

  
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    ARTH 225 - (CA,D,W) Art of the Twentieth Century

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 305) 

    Beginning with pre- World War I works by Matisse and Picasso, this course surveys the painting, sculpture, architecture and photography of the period known as modernism, ending with an exploration of the contemporary phenomenon of postmodernism. Through examination of both artworks and texts by artists and critics, considerations of style and technique will be integrated with an analysis of historical context.

  
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    ARTH 227 - (CA,D,W) Matisse and Picasso

    3 cr.


    (Formerly ARTH 315) 

    This course examines the works of these two influential modern artists by considering the aesthetic and historical context of their paintings, sculptures, prints, and writings on art.

  
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    ARTH 295 - (W,D,CA) Travel Seminar

    1.5 cr.
    Short study trips to provide students with the opportunity to study works of painting, architecture, and sculpture on site. Trips will be designed as themes: the Art Museums of London and Paris, The Bible in Text and Image (Italy), Renaissance Villas and Palaces, Michelangelo, etc.
  
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    ARTH 296 - Art, Ignatius and Rome

    3 cr.


    This 3-week travel seminar explores the Society of Jesus in Counter-Reformation Rome through art produced from Paleo-Christian times through the 17th century.  In the footsteps of Ignatius of Loyola, students examine the intertwined histories of Rome and Ignatius, experiencing growth of the order chronologically as did the saint and his companions.

    (Students taking ARTH 296 for credit may not take ARTH 312 for credit.)

  
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    ARTH 310 - (CA,W) Heaven, Hell, Apocalypse

    3 cr.
    This cross-disciplinary course studies visual depictions of Heaven and Hell in Christian, Islamic, Jewish, Egyptian, Ancient Near-Eastern and Greco-Roman cultures, 3000 BC-1600 AD.  Apocalyptic imagery based upon the biblical Book of Revelation is studied in historic, artistic, and theological contexts; with literary texts (e.g. Epic of Gilgamesh, Book of the Dead, Aeneid, Divina Commedia) supplying thought and image to artists.
  
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    ARTH 311 - (W,D,CA) Medieval and Renaissance Women

    3 cr.
    This topics course explores various ways of looking at Italian medieval and Renaissance women in text and image. Primary texts by Hildegard von Bingen, Giovanni Boccaccio, Christine de Pisan, Leonbattista Alberti and Baldassare Castiglione will be studied for the light they shed on the notion and nature of woman. Great emphasis will be placed on in-class analysis of images, and a field trip to the Italian Renaissance collection of the Metropolitan Museum, NYC, will enable students to apply skills of visual analysis.
  
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    ARTH 312 - (W) Jesuit Spirituality & Art

    3 cr.


    This course explores art inspired, commissioned and produced by the Society of Jesus, 1540 through 1840, in both the Old and New Worlds and among Asian cultures.  Texts by Jerome Nadal, Louis Richeome and Ignatius’ Spiritual Exercises will be studied as guides to thought and interpretation.

    (Students who take ARTH 312 for credit may not take ARTH 296 for credit.)

 

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